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04-28-2009, 09:32 PM   #16
Damn Brit
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You could pick up an old manual focus 135mm or 200mm f2.8 or f3.5 relatively cheaply (under a $100), a screwmount adapter is about $30.
You will have to learn to manually focus, prefocus and judge the action (whatever it is, you haven't said) but there's nothing wrong with learning new skills.
Some of those old lenses produce very good quality images.

04-28-2009, 10:40 PM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by Damn Brit Quote
You could pick up an old manual focus 135mm or 200mm f2.8 or f3.5 relatively cheaply (under a $100), a screwmount adapter is about $30.
You will have to learn to manually focus, prefocus and judge the action (whatever it is, you haven't said) but there's nothing wrong with learning new skills.
Some of those old lenses produce very good quality images.
I won that Vivitar 100-300 f/5 off of Ebay for $50. I am going to test it this weekend at a friend's son's baseball game.

Brit is right.

Look around and you may pick up a bargain like I did.

Granted the lens is not that fast, it will suit my needs because I know how to compensate with the camera body.
04-28-2009, 11:18 PM   #18
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I am sure all of us agree, there is no offence in your query. Only way to learn is to put your doubts forward and, to be sure, there will be plenty of assistance forthcoming here.
Perhaps I may have sounded a bit condascending, and I apologise for that.
Just follow the hints given, experiment and don't be afraid to try a setting that's a bit radical now and again and you will surely become extremely proficient and confident.. Best of success in your photography.
04-28-2009, 11:50 PM   #19
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Don't forget noise reduction software.

So, if you are finally forced to use a high ISO setting, you can reduce the noise to more acceptable levels.. Noise Ninja is one option, and there are others.

Paul

04-29-2009, 03:10 AM   #20
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I'll add to what Marc said and save you the trouble of googling.

Visit this site for an EV chart: Ultimate Exposure Computer

A cloudy evening has an EV of probably 10 or 11. To shoot at f5.6 at 1/250 requires an ISO of 800 at an EV of 10. This applies to every camera made since the dawn of time, and there is no getting around it.
04-30-2009, 06:37 AM   #21
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Original Poster
Thank you for the replies and suggestions everyone.

Thank you for the link MPrince!

Bramela-no worries..it's all good.

I'm looking forward to getting to know everyone around here. I'll post some work as I get some...things are very slow right now.

Misty
04-30-2009, 08:31 PM   #22
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QuoteOriginally posted by strictlypentax Quote
Thank you for the replies and suggestions everyone.

Thank you for the link MPrince!

Bramela-no worries..it's all good.

I'm looking forward to getting to know everyone around here. I'll post some work as I get some...things are very slow right now.

Misty
Hi

I guess i have been having the same issues, i have previously (past 5 years) being using a kyocera m410r point and shoot (very fast for its time) and was used to doing lowish light shots at iso100 at fairly high shutter speeds..

i now have the K20 and have been struggling with shots i know i could of gotten with the m410, admittedly the quality wouldnt of been there, but i guess its just a case of me having to learn the tools, and the shots and what is required. Im not used to thinking while im shooting!

I was at the zoo the other day (Bright and sunny day) and was struggling with low shutter speeds and trying to get the exposure right (shadows with bright background) i started to become a bit disspointed, but then thought, NO! i used and became familiar with my old camera for 5 years, in 1 month i can hardly expect to master such a phenomenaly complicated camera, and learn all about the differences between an SLR and a P&S

im still getting some nice shots.. but im not getting half of the amount of keepers i would of got before. I just put it down to my incompetence!

I dont have any low light issues with my old manual 50mm 1.7 tho... just speed of focus and pressing all the buttons in the right order! im yet to use the 70-150 vivitar f3.8 i got from ebay for 15... but will do soon!

Thanks

Steve
04-30-2009, 09:31 PM   #23
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QuoteOriginally posted by 5teve Quote
Hi

I guess i have been having the same issues, i have previously (past 5 years) being using a kyocera m410r point and shoot (very fast for its time) and was used to doing lowish light shots at iso100 at fairly high shutter speeds..

i now have the K20 and have been struggling with shots i know i could of gotten with the m410, admittedly the quality wouldnt of been there, but i guess its just a case of me having to learn the tools, and the shots and what is required. Im not used to thinking while im shooting!

I was at the zoo the other day (Bright and sunny day) and was struggling with low shutter speeds and trying to get the exposure right (shadows with bright background) i started to become a bit disspointed, but then thought, NO! i used and became familiar with my old camera for 5 years, in 1 month i can hardly expect to master such a phenomenaly complicated camera, and learn all about the differences between an SLR and a P&S

im still getting some nice shots.. but im not getting half of the amount of keepers i would of got before. I just put it down to my incompetence!

I dont have any low light issues with my old manual 50mm 1.7 tho... just speed of focus and pressing all the buttons in the right order! im yet to use the 70-150 vivitar f3.8 i got from ebay for 15... but will do soon!

Thanks

Steve
What kind of lens did you have at the zoo?

You are not incompetent.

Have you ever used an slr/dslr before you used your point and shoot?

You say you have an old 5omm 1.7.

You bought a fairly sophisicated camera, but if you keep playing with it, you will master it in no time.

04-30-2009, 09:38 PM   #24
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QuoteOriginally posted by res3567 Quote
What kind of lens did you have at the zoo?

You are not incompetent.

Have you ever used an slr/dslr before you used your point and shoot?

You say you have an old 5omm 1.7.

You bought a fairly sophisicated camera, but if you keep playing with it, you will master it in no time.
I have to disagree with you... i am incompetent but in a nice way... lets say i need time to learn..!

I had my 70-300 4.0- 5.6 sigma cheapy.. it does the job until such a time i can justify the cost of a nice faster walkaround zoom...

Nope never so much as even held an SLR prior to the K20, i bought the fastish 50 from ebay, its an auto chinon 50mm 1.7, which i am very impressed with (im easy to please) it generally under exposes but does produce to my eye very pleasing images!

I guess the point i was trying to make was that i am surprised how much im struggling with the apertures and shutter speeds.. compared to my Old P&S.. im situations i wasnt expecting to.

Im sure i will learn.. im learning rapidly from books and from what you guys have to share here...

Thanks

Steve
04-30-2009, 09:47 PM   #25
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QuoteOriginally posted by 5teve Quote
I have to disagree with you... i am incompetent but in a nice way... lets say i need time to learn..!

I had my 70-300 4.0- 5.6 sigma cheapy.. it does the job until such a time i can justify the cost of a nice faster walkaround zoom...

Nope never so much as even held an SLR prior to the K20, i bought the fastish 50 from ebay, its an auto chinon 50mm 1.7, which i am very impressed with (im easy to please) it generally under exposes but does produce to my eye very pleasing images!

I guess the point i was trying to make was that i am surprised how much im struggling with the apertures and shutter speeds.. compared to my Old P&S.. im situations i wasnt expecting to.

Im sure i will learn.. im learning rapidly from books and from what you guys have to share here...

Thanks

Steve
Keep on reading and playing with the camera. If you have specific questions about anything, please ask and we will be glad to help you.
04-30-2009, 10:10 PM   #26
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QuoteOriginally posted by 5teve Quote
I have to disagree with you... i am incompetent but in a nice way... lets say i need time to learn..!

I had my 70-300 4.0- 5.6 sigma cheapy.. it does the job until such a time i can justify the cost of a nice faster walkaround zoom...

Nope never so much as even held an SLR prior to the K20, i bought the fastish 50 from ebay, its an auto chinon 50mm 1.7, which i am very impressed with (im easy to please) it generally under exposes but does produce to my eye very pleasing images!

I guess the point i was trying to make was that i am surprised how much im struggling with the apertures and shutter speeds.. compared to my Old P&S.. im situations i wasnt expecting to.

Im sure i will learn.. im learning rapidly from books and from what you guys have to share here...

Thanks

Steve
One thing to watch is that a P&S has a tiny sensor and a very short focal length lens. This combination tends to give a large depth of field even at large apertures. The DSLR, with its sensor about 6 times the size of the P&S sensor, does not give the equivalent depth of field, so focusing tends to be much more critical. This might be all you are seeing. You might be focused in the wrong plane.

Try using center point focusing only. You might get better results. It should be slightly faster as well, because the camera doesn't have to decide on which point to use before focusing.
04-30-2009, 10:41 PM   #27
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QuoteOriginally posted by Canada_Rockies Quote
One thing to watch is that a P&S has a tiny sensor and a very short focal length lens. This combination tends to give a large depth of field even at large apertures. The DSLR, with its sensor about 6 times the size of the P&S sensor, does not give the equivalent depth of field, so focusing tends to be much more critical. This might be all you are seeing. You might be focused in the wrong plane.

Try using center point focusing only. You might get better results. It should be slightly faster as well, because the camera doesn't have to decide on which point to use before focusing.
Always have used centre point... even on the old P&S.. i find it easier to focus and recompose than either selecting a point or having the camera choose!

i was wondering about the sensor size and how it possibly needs less light, which would give me a reason for faster shutter on the P&S. Our friends have a panasonic P&S which i commented on the huge depth of field on the other day.. so thats why thanks!

its just down to experience.. and familiarity i think... i'll get there.... sometime soon

Thanks for the info..

Steve
05-01-2009, 03:03 AM   #28
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QuoteOriginally posted by 5teve Quote
i was wondering about the sensor size and how it possibly needs less light, which would give me a reason for faster shutter on the P&S. Our friends have a panasonic P&S which i commented on the huge depth of field on the other day.. so thats why thanks!
Beside the much greater (sometimes nearly infinite) depth of field there is another difference between (Panasonic) bridge cams and DSLR's: they usually have larger max aperture size than DSLR kit and cheap zoom lenses.

For example my FZ5's lens has a max aperture of 2.8 at 36mm (equiv. focal lenght) and 3.3 at 432mm. If you compare that to the kit lens, you get 3.5 at 18mm and 5.6 at 55mm. So much more light can reach my FZ5's sensor even at 432mm. It has a much smaller sensor and the lens is very close to it (it is just 6mm away from the sensor at 36mm equivalent focal lenght), this allows to build and use a lens with such big aperture. On a DSLR the sensor is much larger and the lens is much further away from the sensor.
That's why I can use faster shutter speeds (at same ISO, under same light) on the FZ5 than on my DSLR with the kit lens. Of course I could buy and use F2.8 lenses on the DSLR, but they are bigger, heavier and cost much more.

Just mentioned it because usually these two differences (DOF and lenses with smaller aperture) disappoint DSLR newbies upgrading from bridge cams in my experience. So don't be disappointed with your cam if you can't use the same shutter speed as what you were used to on your bridge/superzoom cam. You can compensate this with much higher usable ISO and/or spending extra money on fast F2.8 lenses
05-01-2009, 11:14 AM   #29
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QuoteOriginally posted by 5teve Quote
i was wondering about the sensor size and how it possibly needs less light, which would give me a reason for faster shutter on the P&S.
No. In a given setting, two cameras with the same ISO and apertures set shold yield the *same* shutter speeds, independent of sensor size. Sometimes there would be *slight* variations (less than half a stop) due to differences in the light transmission of the glass in the lens or how the ISO values were calibrated. But if you were getting fst shutter speeds at f/2.8 and ISO 100 on a P&S camera, you should be just as fast shutter speeds at f/2.8 and ISO 100 on your K20D - at most maybe half a stop slower. And of course, since you can increase ISO much higher on the K20D, you should actually be able to get *much faster* shutter speeds.

So I'd say you are misunderstanding something about what is happening, and/or doing something wrong. Can you post comparison shots from both cameras of the same scene that you believe were taken with the same ISO and aperture?
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