Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
05-14-2009, 11:40 AM   #31
Pentaxian




Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Western Canada
Posts: 3,825
QuoteOriginally posted by Blue Quote
With the exception of South Africa, they have been known as Pentax since 1957. Asahi wasn't used in the U.S. for a long time. Honeywell was on Pentax cameras. In other words, Pentax had the name recognition more so than Asahi Optical Company. One just didn't say, "I'm going down to the camera shop and buy me a Asahi Pentax Spot F" in the U.S.


Edit: "Pentax" was one of the names the Nippon Optical Corporation cycled through when searching for a name for their new camera in 1948, but ended up calling it the "Nikon" instead.
No disagreement with what you say, just some more info.

Only from 1959 on was Asahi associated with the Honeywell name to distribute cameras under the Honeywell Pentax name in America and Mexico. In the rest of the world the cameras were known as Asahi Pentax. Honeywell's photographic division was known as Heiland.

This info is from the Honeywell Pentax Manual by Joseph Cooper.

I bought a Asahi Pentax , new...in '68 in Canada. All Pentaxes in Canada were distributed by the McQueen Company around this time.

I believe the Honeywell name and the McQueen distribution arrangement disappeared sometime in the '70's.

I beleive Sears even marketed Pentaxes as Towers for awhile.

But as you say...the camera was known as Pentax...not really Asahi or Honeywell.

But then as now, I would much rather have a Asahi Pentax then a Honeywell or a Tower.


Last edited by lesmore49; 05-14-2009 at 11:45 AM.
05-14-2009, 11:50 AM   #32
Pentaxian




Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Western Canada
Posts: 3,825
QuoteOriginally posted by Blue Quote
Relative to the lenses, it is actually good. It is a lot like an SV but with an led indicator. The 70mm lens that Pentax made for this camera is one of the better lenses.

Edit: Show me another interchangeable lens SLR that you can do this with.

I remember these 110's when they were new. Great engineering...but strictly a dead end. The film format is so small that IMO it doesn't matter how good the design and engineering are..the pix won't compare to a good 35mm SLR.

I handled one with all the lenses back in the '80's when I was considering a Pentax 6 X 7.

The camera store owner put the 110 slr system by a 6 X 7 and a black 35 mm Pentax slr.

It was an interesting picture....but I still much prefer the 35 mm and 6 X 7.

There was another high quality 110 camera I recall trying out...the so called 'spy camera' the 110 Minox. Again a jewel, but really more of a novelty.
05-14-2009, 12:14 PM   #33
Moderator
Site Supporter
Blue's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Florida Hill Country
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 17,166
QuoteOriginally posted by lesmore49 Quote
. . .

There was another high quality 110 camera I recall trying out...the so called 'spy camera' the 110 Minox. Again a jewel, but really more of a novelty.
Minolta had an interesting interchangeable lens 110 system out in the late 70s as well. I agree that the film format which comes out to about 16mm has a lot to be desired.
05-14-2009, 01:24 PM   #34
Pentaxian




Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Western Canada
Posts: 3,825
QuoteOriginally posted by Blue Quote
Minolta had an interesting interchangeable lens 110 system out in the late 70s as well. I agree that the film format which comes out to about 16mm has a lot to be desired.

That's right, I forgot about that one. Minolta also built the small, well built Leica CL and I believe there was a Minolta 'brand' of this Leica. They were great little cameras...Minolta came out with a lot of great stuff over the years. Sad to see the name fade into obscurity...I know Minolta lives on with Sony...but I'd prefer the Minolta name over Sony any day, when it comes to cameras.

05-15-2009, 10:47 AM   #35
Pentaxian




Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Bay Village, Ohio USA
Posts: 1,025
Minolta 110

QuoteOriginally posted by Blue Quote
Minolta had an interesting interchangeable lens 110 system out in the late 70s as well. I agree that the film format which comes out to about 16mm has a lot to be desired.
The Minolta 110 did not have interchangeable lenses. It came with a zoom lens.

AFAIK, the Pentax and Minolta were the only 110 SLR's ever made, and Pentax was the only one with interchangeable lenses.

Here's a brief description in Wikipedia: Minolta 110 Zoom SLR - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Paul Noble
05-15-2009, 01:15 PM   #36
Moderator
Site Supporter
Blue's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Florida Hill Country
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 17,166
QuoteOriginally posted by noblepa Quote
The Minolta 110 did not have interchangeable lenses. It came with a zoom lens.

AFAIK, the Pentax and Minolta were the only 110 SLR's ever made, and Pentax was the only one with interchangeable lenses.

Here's a brief description in Wikipedia: Minolta 110 Zoom SLR - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Paul Noble

O.k. so the lenses weren't interchangeable. However, they were SLR with 25-50mm and 25-67mm lens options available (110 Zoom SLR & 110 Zoom SLR Mark II).

MINOLTA 110 CAMERAS

Last edited by Blue; 05-15-2009 at 01:20 PM.
05-15-2009, 03:23 PM   #37
Pentaxian




Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Western Canada
Posts: 3,825
QuoteOriginally posted by noblepa Quote
The Minolta 110 did not have interchangeable lenses. It came with a zoom lens.

AFAIK, the Pentax and Minolta were the only 110 SLR's ever made, and Pentax was the only one with interchangeable lenses.

Here's a brief description in Wikipedia: Minolta 110 Zoom SLR - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Paul Noble
I read your reference seems to be the case. But the engineering with the little Minolta can't be discounted. Another fine little camera with Minolta involvement was the Leica CL...a camera I wouldn't mind having.

From the sane era was the Minolta tabletop tripod...a beautiful little copy of the Leica model....I've had one for about a quarter of a century. Great little quality piece...Minolta made or was involved in the design of some very fine equipment back then.
05-15-2009, 06:05 PM   #38
Veteran Member
jeffkrol's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Wisconsin USA
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 8,434
Maybe honeywell helped w/ the K7 AF ;)

SMC Pentax-Zoom 35-70mm f/2.8 (1976)
An early autofocus lens, based on patented Honeywell Visitronic autofocus system. Specifications: 7-group 7-element construction, Minimum aperture f/22, Minimum focusing distance 1m, Size: 84x94x124mm, Filter diameter 58mm.

http://www.aohc.it/proto2e.htm

Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
camera, dslr, photography
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Can I use my Dslr Pentax lenses on a film SLR? Billium28 Pentax Film SLR Discussion 25 10-19-2010 05:51 AM
Interesting DSLR history KungPOW Non-Pentax Cameras: Canon, Nikon, etc. 2 11-26-2009 07:03 AM
Pentax Had a 4% Share of DSLR in 2008 fwbigd Pentax News and Rumors 30 09-29-2009 07:21 PM
Another Best of 2008 DSLR poll where Pentax rules flyer Pentax News and Rumors 2 01-25-2009 03:38 AM
New Pentax dslr for mid-2008 Lazar Pentax News and Rumors 62 01-26-2008 06:55 AM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 05:16 PM. | See also: NikonForums.com, part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top