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06-06-2009, 10:44 AM   #1
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Airport Security Screening

Pretty much everytime I put my camera bag on the X-ray belt I get asked by the uniforms if it contains a video camera. I just say, "No, digital still" and that's enough to satisfy them.

Well now that the newest SLR's do in fact shoot video, if I upgrade then I suppose I'll have to start answering "Yes".

But I'm wondering why they make the distinction.

Any ideas?

regards,
-tom


Last edited by tpeace; 06-06-2009 at 10:45 AM. Reason: spelling
06-06-2009, 11:06 AM   #2
and
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heh, thats interesting. I wonder what they will say if it is a video camera. nothing against the rules with taking a video cam aboard afaik
06-06-2009, 11:32 AM   #3
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QuoteOriginally posted by and Quote
heh, thats interesting. I wonder what they will say if it is a video camera. nothing against the rules with taking a video cam aboard afaik
Lets put it this way, my cellphone can take videos so are most point and shoot cameras. The reason for asking if it is specifically a video camera is more for identification while going under the scanner. If it is, more questions would be asked to identify if it is a video cassette type therefore helping in preventing damage by handling it differently. On many occasions, the staff simply wants to minimize damage to any of your stuff either by the scanner or a search. If you are curious ask them why politely and you will get the reason. By knowing you will help the security staff do a better job and speed the security screening process in the future.
06-07-2009, 07:13 AM   #4
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QuoteOriginally posted by tpeace Quote
Pretty much everytime I put my camera bag on the X-ray belt I get asked by the uniforms if it contains a video camera. I just say, "No, digital still" and that's enough to satisfy them.

Well now that the newest SLR's do in fact shoot video, if I upgrade then I suppose I'll have to start answering "Yes".

But I'm wondering why they make the distinction.

Any ideas?

regards,
-tom
Technically, any camera with automatic exposure-advance (film-motor-drive, continuous-mode, burst-mode, etc) is not a _still_ camera.

It's amusing that some of the curmudgeons, er, senior members are bemoaning the addition of 'video' to the K-7 'still' camera. We've had various degrees of non-still-ness for many years now (see above paragraph), so it's not a quantuum leap to 30fps.

06-07-2009, 08:20 AM   #5
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Nonsense. My canon T90 was a still camera. An OM-2n with motor-drive is still camera. Even the output of cameras in burst mode mode is not in a video format. Tell me, what wrapper is the K20D using in burst mode? What container format? What codec?

I will continue to consider video on a DSLR as fluff. You may not. But tell me, will you use a ball head or a pan head tripod with your K-7?
06-07-2009, 08:46 AM   #6
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Airport Screeners

I just did this yesterday.

They're asking whether you have a video camera that can take a tape cassette. If you have one it has to be out of your bag so they can x-ray the cassette cavity for foreign items inserted where the tape should go. Its the same principle as taking your laptop out of the bag.
06-07-2009, 10:41 AM   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by Duck Dodgers Quote
Nonsense. My canon T90 was a still camera. An OM-2n with motor-drive is still camera. Even the output of cameras in burst mode mode is not in a video format. Tell me, what wrapper is the K20D using in burst mode? What container format? What codec?
The nonsense is your rigid definitions of still and motion.

I didn't say that burst-mode was video, rather that cameras which can capture a sequence of images which can be animated to simulate motion are inherently not still cameras. Video is just a subset of motion-pictures/animation.

Codecs? Did motion-pictures not exist before codecs? Of course they did.
Here is the original "codec" moment: Zoopraxiscope - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Heck, old Eadward Muybridge used a row of 27 still-cameras to capture a sequence of images (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/73/The_Horse_in_Motion.jpg) used to create animations like this:

This is a technique which was recently reinvented as "bullet-time" using a 2-D array of cameras and popularized by scenes in "The Matrix" movie. Such as the camera set up here:


A video mode on a "still" camera is no different than, say, an intervalometer except that it automates the animation process.

Therefore the argument of video-is-useless-on-a-'still'-camera is by extension an argument against all automation. Therefore, it's pointless to single out a video feature as more useless than other useless features.

The only pure photographers are the ones sitting in a camera-obscura tracing images on a wall. The rest of us are just w@nkers.
06-08-2009, 08:00 AM   #8
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They don't want to deal with complaints and damage claims so certain items get different treatment. Most camcorders use tape and the scan may damage the tape and heads.

06-09-2009, 08:43 PM   #9
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The tape cavity idea could be correct but I always thought that it was due to the larger batteries that video cameras traditionally used. Laptops also have large batteries and quite a bit of effort goes into figuring out ways to scan them effectively. There was a time when laptops were banned from aircraft after a bomb was placed in a battery. I presume that the standard "camcorders" raised similar concerns. Bottom line is I wouldn't get overly technical. If it doesn't look like a video recorder, they won't be concerned.
06-10-2009, 10:53 PM   #10
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QuoteOriginally posted by dave9t5 Quote
Technically, any camera with automatic exposure-advance (film-motor-drive, continuous-mode, burst-mode, etc) is not a _still_ camera.
If the EU says it's not a video camera, and taxes it accordingly, who am I to argue?

Thank you
Russell

Last edited by Russell-Evans; 06-11-2009 at 10:56 PM.
06-11-2009, 10:20 AM   #11
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QuoteOriginally posted by Denis Quote
If you are curious ask them why politely and you will get the reason. By knowing you will help the security staff do a better job and speed the security screening process in the future.
That's my opinion too. Just ask them politely. Normally they are trainned to be nice to the clients (the passengers are clients of the airport too) and many of them welcome questions. Makes their day a little different and better.

I've asked lots of questions (not to the same one) and they've been allways correct with me.

Best,
Luis
06-11-2009, 02:14 PM   #12
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QuoteOriginally posted by lpfonseca Quote
That's my opinion too. Just ask them politely. Normally they are trainned to be nice to the clients (the passengers are clients of the airport too) and many of them welcome questions. Makes their day a little different and better.

I've asked lots of questions (not to the same one) and they've been allways correct with me.

Best,
Luis
You must have never been to the Los Angeles airport

But yes, in general airport security staff are helpful and friendly. It's just best to know for yourself what the rules are and how to stay within them, since varying interpretations of the rules from airport to airport is a big problem.
06-11-2009, 02:17 PM   #13
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The guy from Pentax Colorado who started posting here recently said they limited the video length on the k-7 so that the EU would not consider it a video camera. I would go with that.... nothing Pentax makes in the near future will be considered a video camera. I think he said anything that records less 30min of video at a time is not a video camera
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