Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
08-02-2009, 12:40 AM   #1
Senior Member
jack56's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Tacoma, WA
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 119
Is Dust/Particles a problem with the K20D?

Well, I got the camera last week and the guy was correct, there was LOT's of dust in the viewfinder. My Gosh, his photo's had to suffer too as there was dust on his Sensor too as there were a lot of spots in the photo. No wonder I got it so cheap at $450! But he didn't mislead me as he did say there was a lot of dust particles in the viewfinder.

I have some concerns and would like a honest opinion from you folks with the K20D.
When I got the camera, it had a lot of dust on the focus screen, mirror, sensor & Pentaprism which I've since cleaned.
Is this something I should be concerned with on this camera?


I couldn't stand that and since I build computers, I figured I fix it myself.
It took me 5-6 hours to do it as there was not only dust on the sensor & focus screen, but on the mirror & Pentaprism as well. So I had to clean all four.
Sometimes I got more dust specs after doing it, but finally got it PERFECT!

Here what I used, (didn't use the cloth) I took the focus screen out and looked at up at the sky with the magnifying glass.


I set the camera at smaller lens aperture settings (higher f/numbers) and shot into the blue sky and white paper to see the particles I needed to get rid of. I had to do this at least 8 times before I got it perfect. Then I had to go to work on the focus screen, mirror & Pentaprism.

What it looked like before and the viewfinder/focus screen dust was a lot worst.



What I finished with... Perfect, no dust specs anywhere in viewfinder or photo!



08-02-2009, 02:43 AM   #2
Damn Brit
Guest




It was obviously a concern for that camera when you received it. I would guess that the person who had it before you wasn't very careful.
Dust is going to happen but it's not something you should worry about.
The more you change lenses, the more potential there is for dust but as it seems you are more than able to clean if necessary it won't be a problem if it does occur.
There are precautions you can take. Set dust removal to activate whenever you turn the camera on (it's in one of the menus. Turn off the camera when you change lenses to reduce the chance of static sucking dust in. When you change lenses do so with the camera mount facing down. Be aware of the environment, if you change the lens in a dust storm, dust will obviously get in. A Giottos rocketblower is a good tool to have and should handle the occasional dust spot.
08-02-2009, 11:53 AM   #3
Senior Member
jack56's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Tacoma, WA
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 119
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by Damn Brit Quote
There are precautions you can take. Set dust removal to activate whenever you turn the camera on (it's in one of the menus. Turn off the camera when you change lenses to reduce the chance of static sucking dust in. When you change lenses do so with the camera mount facing down. Be aware of the environment, if you change the lens in a dust storm, dust will obviously get in. A Giottos rocketblower is a good tool to have and should handle the occasional dust spot.
I have the dust removal to activate.
I don't change lenses much, but when I do, I point camera down.
I have the Giottos rocketblower.

So... I guess I should be OK then.
08-02-2009, 02:00 PM   #4
Ash
Community Manager
Loyal Site Supporter
Ash's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Toowoomba, Queensland
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 22,694
You've got the right idea. Viewfinder dust is more of a nuisance than an issue like sensor dust is. So using all the tools you have, and with a bit of knowledge, you'll have a cam that'll always give you crisp, clean images.

08-02-2009, 05:49 PM   #5
Senior Member
jack56's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Tacoma, WA
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 119
Original Poster
I got this from the gentleman who sold me the camera as I asked him via email what I asked here. He had already made the sale and I gave him a good rating, because he shipped fast etc, so he had nothing to hide.

QuoteQuote:
The dust on the focus screen happened while I was in Japan on vacation.
The only thing I can think of was I changed a lens in a really dusty
location. When I returned home I attempted to clean the focus screen, some came off but I didn't want to mess with it any further
and it ended up with what you saw. No additional dust got on the focus
screen after that as far as I can tell.

The sensor had a lot of dust during this time as well but I was able to
blow it off with a rocket blower. In fact I change lens a lot at times
when I'm out shooting and it probably accounts for the dust you cleaned
off the mirror and sensor. I have cleaned the sensor a few times, but not recently. I don't think about dust on the sensor
unless I notice it in my shots and therefore didn't think about when I
sent you the camera.

I don't think there is anything wrong with the camera and think the dust was my fault. You can check for dust on the sensor by going into the menu and selecting the dust alert option. As for the mirror or focus screen you can see it pretty easily. I think you should keep the camera if you like it.
So it looks like the camera will be OK and nothing to worry about. I really did love that K10D I had before this camera.
08-02-2009, 06:56 PM   #6
Pentaxian
Ratmagiclady's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: GA
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 13,470
Sounds like something definitely unusual happened if there's *that* much dust in there: I've not found anything particularly dust-prone about the camera (As well there shouldn't be: the body's weatherseals keep dust out, too, anywhere but when you change lenses, for the most part.) If it appeared suddenly for the fellow on a trip, he probably just changed lenses at the wrong moment, maybe when the air was really dusty and charged or something. Don't let it make you too worried. I would have expected I'd have had some sensor dust by now, cause I shoot primes, even if I'm not a constant lens-changer.

(One suggestion, though, mind the mounts of the lenses themselves, once in a while, some of these caps don't do such a grand job of keeping *those* dust-free. )

By the way, you needn't do the thing with the sky-exposures to find any dust on the sensor, there's a function on the K20d that will map them directly for you.
08-02-2009, 07:22 PM   #7
Site Supporter




Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Detroit MI, USA
Posts: 503
QuoteOriginally posted by Ratmagiclady Quote
Sounds like something definitely unusual happened if there's *that* much dust in there: I've not found anything particularly dust-prone about the camera (As well there shouldn't be: the body's weatherseals keep dust out, too, anywhere but when you change lenses, for the most part.) If it appeared suddenly for the fellow on a trip, he probably just changed lenses at the wrong moment, maybe when the air was really dusty and charged or something. Don't let it make you too worried. I would have expected I'd have had some sensor dust by now, cause I shoot primes, even if I'm not a constant lens-changer.

(One suggestion, though, mind the mounts of the lenses themselves, once in a while, some of these caps don't do such a grand job of keeping *those* dust-free. )

By the way, you needn't do the thing with the sky-exposures to find any dust on the sensor, there's a function on the K20d that will map them directly for you.
Yep, and a neat trick is to use a blank white screen on your PC/notebook monitor. I use MS Word for a white screen and just make sure my lens only sees white, and use the dust map function; it works! At first I was not sure if that would be accurate, it is. I have found dust using that method, its almost better than using the sky as there are always clouds at least where I live and they will give you a false reading.

BTW great job!!!!! you did better than me my first time I asked the forum than bought a new focus screen and ran out and bought the Arctic Butterfly. The K20D is the best Pentax body so far as far as keeping dust out. The focus screen stays clean, a few times a year if you change lens you may be a spot on it, but is usually on the bottom, just give a quick puff with your blower. Don't have to take it out every-time. I am surprised you did not scratch your focus screen. Dust on the mirror does not show unless its huge and thick. Oh well, you know best, nice job
08-02-2009, 07:45 PM   #8
Senior Member
jack56's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Tacoma, WA
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 119
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by Ratmagiclady Quote
By the way, you needn't do the thing with the sky-exposures to find any dust on the sensor, there's a function on the K20d that will map them directly for you.
I didn't know that at the time. I did the next day after I did all that work.
I gotta have things perfect so I had it apart within a half hour of getting it via USPS.

Thanks for all the responses. I really like this camera.

08-02-2009, 08:08 PM   #9
Loyal Site Supporter
Rupert's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Texas
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 24,890
No problems here...

I've had my K20D for almost a year and a half and over 20K shots with an abundance of lens changing and have yet to have a speck show up on my sensor for more than a little while before it is gone. I use the start-up cleaning cycle, and it has apparently worked for me, or I have been very lucky...which is possible, I am a very lucky guy!
Viewfinder...yep, I have to clean it every so often...like most any camera I assume?
Now that you have it all clean, I bet it stays that way. Good luck!
08-02-2009, 08:37 PM   #10
Veteran Member
Eruditass's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 2,206
a little OT - is a a clean plastic syringe - only having used water before - just as good to use on a sensor as the rocket blower?

something like this


The one I have is pretty capable of force, although the stream hole is smaller looking.
08-12-2009, 10:23 AM   #11
Senior Member




Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 199
Dirt speck

I just got my K20d and I'm glad I did. I'm pretty dissapointed though that on the first job I use with it, a big speck of dirt got into the viewfinder. Since it's not on the sensor I can live with it, but really, what happened to the weather seals? I didn't even change lenses the entire time I was shooting.

I don't think I'm as daring as you Jack to open everything up to clean, but thanks for sharing your cleaning setup.
08-12-2009, 10:46 AM   #12
Pentaxian
Marc Sabatella's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Denver, CO
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 10,686
QuoteOriginally posted by Eruditass Quote
a little OT - is a a clean plastic syringe - only having used water before - just as good to use on a sensor as the rocket blower?
Not quite. Most blowers intended for the purpose have a filter on the intake so you don't suck in dust from the air and then blow it onto the sensor. The syringe won't. but perhaps it's intake is narrow enough that it won't matter?
08-12-2009, 02:23 PM   #13
Veteran Member
Eruditass's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 2,206
Do the rocket blowers really have a filter? How do you go about cleaning it then? From what I read/saw, it just has feet so it doesn't grab a bunch of dusk when it is set down.

I had planned to suck the air in through the nozzle and that is pretty thin regardless.

The reason why I wanted to use it is because my syringe is actually angled at the bottom, so I can blow the air towards the sticky dust trap at the bottom, where a rocket blower would send it in a random direction, a criticism I had read about it, where it can end up somewhere like the focusing screen or the viewfinder.

In addition, the angle that is more parallel to the sensor would seem to be the most effective at removing dust.
08-12-2009, 02:47 PM   #14
Pentaxian
Marc Sabatella's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Denver, CO
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 10,686
QuoteOriginally posted by Eruditass Quote
Do the rocket blowers really have a filter? How do you go about cleaning it then? From what I read/saw, it just has feet so it doesn't grab a bunch of dusk when it is set down.
I'm sure there are different models, but the ones I've seen have the intake valve on the rear, and yes, there is a filter. I don't think it usually desgned to be cleaned - if you ever got concerned it had got clogged (like if it was having problems taking in air), I guess you'd just shake vigorously or bang it against something to knock the stuff loose. But I've never had that happen to me, nor heard of it happening to anyone else.
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
camera, dslr, dust, focus, lot, mirror, pentaprism, photography, screen, sensor, sky, viewfinder
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
dust problem? iggy373 Troubleshooting and Beginner Help 11 12-02-2009 08:37 AM
Dirt/dust problem. Suggestions please? spillway Photographic Technique 16 09-22-2008 08:17 AM
Dust particles JMR Post Your Photos! 2 08-07-2008 06:50 AM
Dust or CCD Problem? Twinky Pentax DSLR Discussion 9 07-09-2007 11:27 AM
Persistent dust problem GLThorne Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 4 04-06-2007 06:09 AM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 06:57 PM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top