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08-09-2009, 12:40 PM   #1
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Exposure Metering Timer

I've been using an SLR for years, own the K10D and now the K20D. I've read all the manuals, searched the forums. But I have virtually no understanding of what "exposure metering timer" means.

Can someone please explain it to me?

Thank you,
Michael

08-09-2009, 01:02 PM   #2
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It refers to how long (duration) the camera's exposure meter will stay on after you half press shutter button to activate the meter. Default setting is 10 seconds. Pretty basic really.
08-09-2009, 01:42 PM   #3
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Right, but it might not be clear what it means in practice for the exposure meter to stay on. It means, for example, that the viewfinder display will stay active and keep updating as the light or the scene changes (eg, in Av mode, showing you the shutter speed it is selecting, or in M mode, showing you how much the selected exposure differs from the meter's suggested exposure). On some models, that's also how long the window is in which you can press the "Green" or equivalent button in M mode to get the camera to set the exposure for you.
08-09-2009, 04:25 PM   #4
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I was under the impression that I could life my finger off the shutter button, and the camera will continue to evaluate exposure during that time period. Is that true?

08-09-2009, 06:39 PM   #5
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QuoteOriginally posted by samiam Quote
I was under the impression that I could life my finger off the shutter button, and the camera will continue to evaluate exposure during that time period. Is that true?
Yes, that's how it works.
Its useful for checking out how the metering will change if you change your composition. It can vary a lot if you do spot metering.

+ If you do an Exposure Lock (AE-Lock button), the lock will stay on for 2x the time period you set for this timer.
08-09-2009, 08:36 PM   #6
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QuoteOriginally posted by kittykat46 Quote
Yes, that's how it works.
Its useful for checking out how the metering will change if you change your composition. It can vary a lot if you do spot metering.

+ If you do an Exposure Lock (AE-Lock button), the lock will stay on for 2x the time period you set for this timer.
Ok, that totally clears it up for me. Thanks to all of you who responded!
08-12-2009, 01:55 PM   #7
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One day, i set my metering timer to the maximum with the mode set to AV, and went around indoors seeing how my metering was affected by proximity to various objects and windows. In many cases there was agreement between spot, center and multi-sector. other times there were differences. part of getting to know your camera a little bit better.

Phil
08-12-2009, 02:27 PM   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by philbaum Quote
One day, i set my metering timer to the maximum with the mode set to AV, and went around indoors seeing how my metering was affected by proximity to various objects and windows. In many cases there was agreement between spot, center and multi-sector. other times there were differences. part of getting to know your camera a little bit better.

Phil
With modern cameras being so complex, it seems like it needs to be an intimate relationship

08-12-2009, 10:36 PM   #9
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QuoteOriginally posted by philbaum Quote
One day, i set my metering timer to the maximum with the mode set to AV, and went around indoors seeing how my metering was affected by proximity to various objects and windows. In many cases there was agreement between spot, center and multi-sector. other times there were differences. part of getting to know your camera a little bit better.

Phil
That's probably because you were indoors and not enough room for variation when they agreed.
08-13-2009, 01:47 AM   #10
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QuoteOriginally posted by Marc Sabatella Quote
Right, but it might not be clear what it means in practice for the exposure meter to stay on. It means, for example, that the viewfinder display will stay active and keep updating as the light or the scene changes (eg, in Av mode, showing you the shutter speed it is selecting, or in M mode, showing you how much the selected exposure differs from the meter's suggested exposure). On some models, that's also how long the window is in which you can press the "Green" or equivalent button in M mode to get the camera to set the exposure for you.
I don't see why you're making it more difficult than it really is.
A little hands on with the camera will provide the immediate feedback as to how the meter works just as philbaum has also elaborated. What has exposure modes got to do with it...
exposure metering timer = it's just how long the meter stays on...
08-13-2009, 08:41 AM   #11
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QuoteOriginally posted by creampuff Quote
I don't see why you're making it more difficult than it really is.
Hmm, I don't think I'm making anything complicated. I'm simply going into more detail about what it *means* for the meter to stay on. Not everyone already understands that. And indeed, someone who understood that would have been unlikely to have asked the question in the first place.

QuoteQuote:
What has exposure modes got to do with it...
Because of the very particular quirk some models have involving using the Green button (or equivalent) to meter in M mode, where the button does one thing (the right thing) if the meter is currently "on", and another thing (nothing) if the meter is currently off. Useful information for someone wondering why hitting the button isn't doing anything for them.

Last edited by Marc Sabatella; 08-13-2009 at 03:33 PM.
08-13-2009, 10:19 AM   #12
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Your information has been very helpful. Thank you.
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