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01-08-2010, 11:30 PM   #1
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As some of you know

I got my K100D. Now I have some questions about settings I should use.

1. Image Tone. Which one? I've got it set on Natural. Is Bright better or not?

2. What basically is Sensitivity? Is that the same as ISO? That's what I read it as but am not sure.

3. Selecting Metering Mode. Which is better, Multi-metering mode or Center weighted?

I'll probably ask more as I get more into this camera. But any help you can give me I'd appreciate.

01-09-2010, 06:52 AM   #2
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QuoteOriginally posted by photolady Quote
I got my K100D. Now I have some questions about settings I should use.
1. Image Tone. Which one? I've got it set on Natural. Is Bright better or not?
My conclusion is that Natural is better. Bright has more "pop", but has a serious risk of blowing out the red channel, *and* makes human-made blue colors (plastics, brightly-painted objects) come out very wrong in artificial light.


QuoteOriginally posted by photolady Quote
2. What basically is Sensitivity? Is that the same as ISO? That's what I read it as but am not sure.
Yes, that's basically the case.

QuoteOriginally posted by photolady Quote
3. Selecting Metering Mode. Which is better, Multi-metering mode or Center weighted?
If one were best, there wouldn't be an option.

Multi-metering tries to interpret the scene based on the brightness in different parts of the frame, and make a "smart" guess. For example, if the top of the frame is bright and the bottom dark, it might assume that it's sky and land. Or if everything is bright but the middle, maybe a backlit subject. It usually does a good job, but since it's doing "magic", you never know exactly why it made the guess.

Center-weighted is more straightforward: it just measures the brightness in the whole frame, and makes its decision based on that with more emphasis placed on getting the center exposed right.

Which you want depends on what you want.

Book recommendation that covers this well: Focal Press: Michael Freeman's Perfect Exposure - Book
01-09-2010, 08:28 AM   #3
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I agree with Matt that natural is better over all. Bright is punchier, but has a tendency to look more point and shoot-like, for lack of a better description. Sensitivity is iso. Multi metering looks at the whole frame versus focusing primarily on the center. Multimetering has gotten a little better with each new camera -- they add more zones to try to get it to meter accurately. In the K100, it isn't bad, but it does tend to under expose if there is anything bright or reflective at all in the frame.
01-09-2010, 09:20 AM   #4
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I agree with the others, use Natural with the K-100D. I would suggest boosting the sharpness though (I believe Bright boosts Saturation, Sharpness and Contrast).

I tend to change the metering a lot between matrix, CW and spot, so the K100 was a bit frustrating. Especially frustrating because Ev Compensation disables Auto ISO.

One thing to be aware of on the K100D is AWB. It's bloody terrible for incandescent lighting, so always use the Tungsten setting for that.

Congrats on making the move to digital. I'm sure it will be a lot of fun for you, and practicing macros with the Raynox won't cost you a fortune.

01-09-2010, 09:21 AM   #5
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Play with it, there is no penalty, then figure pout if you like bright or natural.
01-09-2010, 05:08 PM   #6
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Thanks all for the responses.

You know I always used Center weight metering which is all I had on the K1000. Seemed to work.

I uploaded two robin photos, I'm not happy with but was told the color just wasn't good enough. If one has to enhance photos that much, wouldn't Bright setting be better? I guess it would depend on what you were shooting.

https://www.pentaxforums.com/forums/photo-critique/86283-nature-robin-1-test.html

The photos were in focus before uploading to the web. Everyone says 72dpi in the Pentax cameras doesn't matter, but I'm from the old school and resizing, resaving a photo that was 72dpi, made for a blurry photo.
01-09-2010, 05:30 PM   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by photolady Quote
The photos were in focus before uploading to the web. Everyone says 72dpi in the Pentax cameras doesn't matter, but I'm from the old school and resizing, resaving a photo that was 72dpi, made for a blurry photo.
Downsizing for the web generally softens an image. I always apply a little sharpening for my websize images. What are the sharpening options in PS Elements, USM, High Pass, other?

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01-09-2010, 06:14 PM   #8
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QuoteQuote:
Downsizing for the web generally softens an image.
I am seeing that a lot. In Elements I have USM, AFAIK. I've not noticed High Pass and to be truthful, never heard of it.

01-09-2010, 09:39 PM   #9
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QuoteOriginally posted by photolady Quote
You know I always used Cen
I uploaded two robin photos, I'm not happy with but was told the color just wasn't good enough. If one has to enhance photos that much, wouldn't Bright setting be better? I guess it would depend on what you were shooting.
In the pictures you posted, I'd say the color looks about right consider it appears to be an overcast day and the pictures are relatively underexposed (to be expected if you didn't apply compensation, since the sky will fool the meter). Having shot the picture half a stop or more brighter, and perhaps shifting WB to overcome the cool cast to the color from the overcast day, would have helped - Bright mode wouldn't be necessary. But it is a totally personal thing.

QuoteQuote:
The photos were in focus before uploading to the web. Everyone says 72dpi in the Pentax cameras doesn't matter, but I'm from the old school and resizing, resaving a photo that was 72dpi, made for a blurry photo.
You are misunderstanding (a very common thing when i coems to this subejct). It isn't the number 72 stored in the EXIF that is making pictures blurry - it's how the resizing was done. Assumign you resize to the proper number of pixels, the number stored in the EXIF has no effect on the viewing of the image on the web. And again, the fact that the *camera* stored 72 in that field is also not relevant here. Note: I am not saying it doens't matter because 72dpi is just as good as 300dpi - that would be crazy. Im saying it doens't matter because the number stored in the EXIF is *not* what controls the actual resolution - it's the number of pixels divided by the dimension in inches, period.
01-09-2010, 09:59 PM   #10
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I forgot Digitals have WB control and I didn't change that before shooting today. I have since reset that for Cloudy. Maybe it will help, and maybe the birds will be here tomorrow so I can test this again.

QuoteQuote:
Im saying it doens't matter because the number stored in the EXIF is *not* what controls the actual resolution - it's the number of pixels divided by the dimension in inches, period.
Ok. Got it.
01-09-2010, 10:10 PM   #11
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QuoteOriginally posted by photolady Quote
I forgot Digitals have WB control and I didn't change that before shooting today. I have since reset that for Cloudy. Maybe it will help, and maybe the birds will be here tomorrow so I can test this again.
AWB is usually pretty good outside. Inside with artificial lighting is usually when it struggles. With digital, it only takes a few seconds to check and choose the right one for that particular time and place.
01-09-2010, 10:10 PM   #12
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QuoteOriginally posted by photolady Quote
I forgot Digitals have WB control and I didn't change that before shooting today. I have since reset that for Cloudy. Maybe it will help, and maybe the birds will be here tomorrow so I can test this again.
AWB is usually pretty good outside. Inside with artificial lighting is usually when it struggles. With digital, it only takes a few seconds to check and choose the right one for that particular time and place. Once you have had the camera for a while, you will learn when to trust AWB and when not to.
01-09-2010, 10:38 PM   #13
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Thanks Gary.
01-10-2010, 08:04 AM   #14
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QuoteOriginally posted by Alfisti Quote
Play with it, there is no penalty, then figure pout if you like bright or natural.

Agreed, we all see differently but i like it "bright" and don't really care if my people look like aliens
01-10-2010, 10:13 AM   #15
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Don't get me wrong - I'm not saying AWB doesn't do a good job of representing reality on overcast days - but reality is color that is often cooler/duller than it would be on a sunny day. So if you're expecting the colors to look as bright as they do on a sunny day, that's not going to happen unless you fudge WB some (either in camera in in PP).
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