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06-23-2007, 09:03 PM   #1
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I'd like to get A K10D but...

I understand the K10D is a serious camera but lately I've become a little concerned about what I've been reading about in reviews of the camera. The common theme is the K10D is for those who take the time to get the most out of it, and that it is not suited for beginners. For me this would be my first DSLR. I have a Canon A80, a fine little P&S, but I want to try my hand at DSLR photography. I'm a complete beginner but I've been reading as much about Pentax DSLR's and lenses as I can get my hands on before I make a purchase.

I suspect the K100D is better suited for a rookie but I like the features (weather sealed body especially) and the feel of the K10D better. I had a chance to hold one and take a few snaps with it at Houston Camera Exchange in Houston, TX. A little more weight, good grip and a nicer viewer.

I guess my basic question is how complex do you think the K10D really is and should I reconsider the K100D?

Thanks.

06-23-2007, 09:39 PM   #2
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In the end, all you have to worry about are aperture, shutter speed, and film/sensor speed. Everything else is just a feature. I don't know how well you adapt to things, but I think you may be over-analyzing the situation. The K10D has a lot more features than the K100D, but the basic operation of the aperture, shutter, and sensor is the same. In all honesty, you can't go wrong with either.

HCE is a great store. I was in town a few months ago and bought my AF540FGZ flash there. I was amazed that they had a good selection of Pentax stock on hand.

Good luck.
06-23-2007, 10:06 PM   #3
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QuoteOriginally posted by ericc Quote
In the end, all you have to worry about are aperture, shutter speed, and film/sensor speed. Everything else is just a feature. I don't know how well you adapt to things, but I think you may be over-analyzing the situation. The K10D has a lot more features than the K100D, but the basic operation of the aperture, shutter, and sensor is the same. In all honesty, you can't go wrong with either.

HCE is a great store. I was in town a few months ago and bought my AF540FGZ flash there. I was amazed that they had a good selection of Pentax stock on hand.

Good luck.
Yeah I may be over-analyzing a bit but I just wanted to get some opinions about the complexity issue. I'll keep "aperture, shutter and sensor speed" in mind though when I do get my DSLR. Thanks for the tip.

HCE will be a great resource. I asked if they had the Tamron 18-200mm in stock just out of curiosity and they did. That's the lens I would probably start with.
06-23-2007, 10:09 PM   #4
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IMO the K10D is all the camera most people would need, whether amatuer (new to DSLR) or even as high as pro level. Don't let it intimidate you.

GET IT !!! Then read the manual and whatever else you can find on it, and play...play...play with it! You won't be sorry.

06-23-2007, 10:33 PM   #5
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I own a K10D and have access to a K100D. The last three weddings I did I used both, each with a different lens. When going through and editing the images the overall IQ is amazing on both and unless my clients are looking for pixel dimention in the files they may never know which ones are which. It is in the handling that the K10 really shines. Adjustments and changes are quicker and easier on the K10D and the viewfinder has more info.

As a walkabout lens the K100 is fantastic and more than enough to satisfy many photo enthusiasts. If you are more serious in your picture taking and like a camera that feels like an extention of your creativity the K10 is the tool of choice.
06-23-2007, 10:42 PM   #6
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Either would be good. My Mum just bought a K100D and really likes it. Images from it are very good and the controls are fine. It's also reasonably solid for the price point. As far as I'm concerned it's about how much money you have if you are just a beginner but in all honesty it wouldn't take long to read the instruction manual and read posts on this forum to learn either camera well enough. Just get the one that feels best for you and if that's the K10D then go for it.

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06-23-2007, 10:48 PM   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by KFrog Quote
Yeah I may be over-analyzing a bit but I just wanted to get some opinions about the complexity issue. I'll keep "aperture, shutter and sensor speed" in mind though when I do get my DSLR. Thanks for the tip.

HCE will be a great resource. I asked if they had the Tamron 18-200mm in stock just out of curiosity and they did. That's the lens I would probably start with.
This is definitely the camera you want. That being said I have the K110d (same as the K100d just no SR) and also the K10D. My son now has his own K110d and loves it. ( I got him that one partly because I got a crazy deal on it and I wanted to see if he would stick with it before spending the money on a second K10D.) But he had never used any SLR camera before. So one day I took him out shooting and tried to give him a quick 30 minute lesson on the K10D. He picked up the "how to's" in about 5 minutes and wanted me to shut up so he could fill the memory card. He took some great shots that day and had no difficulty with the camera. Frankly I think the 10 is easier than the 100 in some ways. More manual and less auto everything. Set the camera on "P" mode and shoot away. Need to adjust the shutter? Turn the wheel on the front. Need to adjust the aperture? Turn the wheel on the back. Want the camera to do it for you? Just push the green button and let it select the settings. It's really that simple. Over time you'll be posting shots we all say wow over.

I'm over simplifying the camera but it isn't that tough to get started. And the camera will grow with you as you begin to experiment with the more advanced features.

If the difference in price is not the issue then go for the K10d, Period. You will not regret the choice. Plus the thing I love about this forum is how helpful and polite everyone here is. I can't remember a single post or answer (other than Rice High) that came across as arrogant or "I know more than you". There are no dumb questions here and I've even gotten private messages from some members who wanted to offer a hand. Everyone here from the best to the newest is on some sort of learning curve.
Point is, if you make the plunge, everyone here will answer the questions that are sure to follow with either camera choice.

Get the camera and order this book at the same time:

NED BUNNELL: Magic Lantern K10D Guide

These guides are a wonderful resource for camera owners at almost any skill level.
06-23-2007, 10:55 PM   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by KFrog Quote
Yeah I may be over-analyzing a bit but I just wanted to get some opinions about the complexity issue. I'll keep "aperture, shutter and sensor speed" in mind though when I do get my DSLR. Thanks for the tip.

HCE will be a great resource. I asked if they had the Tamron 18-200mm in stock just out of curiosity and they did. That's the lens I would probably start with.
You'll do fine with either camera. Re: the lens - the reviews of the new Tamron 18-250 are pretty good, citing better image quality than the 18-200 and while it does cost a bit extra, it also gives you that extra 50mm of reach. Good luck!

06-23-2007, 11:03 PM   #9
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QuoteOriginally posted by KFrog Quote
I understand the K10D is a serious camera but lately I've become a little concerned about what I've been reading about in reviews of the camera. The common theme is the K10D is for those who take the time to get the most out of it, and that it is not suited for beginners. For me this would be my first DSLR. I have a Canon A80, a fine little P&S, but I want to try my hand at DSLR photography. I'm a complete beginner but I've been reading as much about Pentax DSLR's and lenses as I can get my hands on before I make a purchase.

I suspect the K100D is better suited for a rookie but I like the features (weather sealed body especially) and the feel of the K10D better. I had a chance to hold one and take a few snaps with it at Houston Camera Exchange in Houston, TX. A little more weight, good grip and a nicer viewer.

I guess my basic question is how complex do you think the K10D really is and should I reconsider the K100D?

Ah, the Camera Exchange - out on Westheimer, right, or is it Richmond? Great place. (Moved from Houston to Dallas over 4 years ago and my memory is starting to fade.)

Is the K100D better suited to a rookie or (as you describe yourself) a "complete beginner"? Depends on what you mean by rookie and beginner.

If you have no idea whether f/2.8 provides more depth of field or less depth of field than f/16, and if your entire previous experience with cameras has involved the Auto mode or one of the scene modes on your Canon A80, well, that's great - nothing wrong with that at all - but perhaps you should think a bit more about whether you want to bother with a DSLR at all. Consider instead a Canon PowerShot S5 IS or G7 - truly outstanding cameras that will take great pictures and give you some room to grow, without costing you an arm and a leg. (Well, the G7 costs an arm, but just the arm.) If this is the kind of beginner you are, then I suspect you won't just find the K10D too challenging, you may find that the K100D is more camera than you need or want, as well.

On the other hand, if you already know your way around whatever degree of manual controls your current camera has and you are chafing at having to dig in menus to change the ISO, etc., and if you are ready to learn more about photography, then you're certainly ready for a DSLR. And if you are really ready for a dSLR, then you might be ready for the K10D.

From the first-time DSLR buyer's perspective, here are the most significant differences between the k100D and the K10D:
  1. Price
  2. K10D puts more controls at the photographer's fingertips on the outside of the camera, with the front e-dial, the Raw button, the green button, a mechanical switch between AF-S and AF-C, etc.
  3. NO canned "scene modes" on the K10D
  4. K10D has a couple of program modes (USER, TAv) that the k100d lacks.
  5. K10D has a sharper viewfinder
  6. K10D has significantly better continuous shooting (although it's still not great, especially if you shoot Raw)
  7. K10D is a bit bigger and heavier - and you have the option of making it bigger and heavier still by buying a battery grip
There are many other differences between the cameras: megapixels, file format options, ISO options, the K10D's supposedly superior processor, claims about the K10D being somewhat noisier, the K10D's weather-sealing and sturdier build, etc. But I think the ones I've listed are the ones that will matter to you as a first-time DSLR buyer.

Now the one that matters most is #1: price. Keep in mind that buying a DSLR is like buying a dog. The initial purchase price is only the beginning of the damage to your pocketbook. I like to say that, if you're the sort of person who ought to be buying a DSLR in the first place, there is a real likelihood that, within a fairly short time, you're going to want to start spending more money on your camera - to buy another lens (or two lenses, or three, or four), and a flash attachment, and a battery grip, and a better tripod, etc. So if budgeting matters to you (and it does for most of us), then my rule of thumb would be: assume that you will want to spend at least TWICE the cost of the camera within six months, that is, if the camera costs $600, expect to want to spend another $600 within six months. So if the lower-priced camera is comfortably within your budget and the higher-priced camera is not, then buy the lower-priced one, and spend whatever money you have left on another lens or two.

After price, I think that the SECOND most important difference between the K100D and the K10D is the one I listed second above: the fact that so many of the controls on the K10D are right at your finger-tips all the time. Actually, there's a LOT more to this than meets the eye, because the K10D is so customizable. But even the superficial differences that I listed above are a big deal.

What you get with the K10D isn't better photographs - certainly not automatically! - but simply a better photo-taking tool. If you want to take better photos, well, you're going to have to work for them. And one of the main ways in which the K10D is better is that, it is an easier tool to use.

That's right - the K10D is EASIER, not harder, to use than the K100D. That's one of the main reasons why serious photographers spend more money for more advanced cameras. TAv mode on the K10D, for example, allows me to set the aperture wide and the shutter fast, and let the camera adjust the ISO for a proper exposure. This is perfect for my indoor sports photography. I could take the same photos on the k100D, but I'd have to put up with some variations in exposure - or I'd have to be changing my shutter speed constantly as I shoot. Having the front e-dial on the K10D means that I don't have to hold down a modifier button to adjust the shutter speed - I have one dial in front for shutter, one in back for aperture. Brilliant. P (hyperprogram) mode on the K10D allows me to start with a sort of auto mode but take some control by adjusting the aperture OR the shutter and letting the camera adjust the other setting for me; so I can shoot in P but stop down the aperture to increase depth of field, and I don't have to switch to M or Av to do this.

The claim that the K10D is too hard for beginners is a lie or at least misleading, and it's also kind of stupid, in my opinion. The only thing about the K10D that makes it "less easy" than the less expensive models is that it completely lacks the scene modes. But for Pete's sake, if you're using those scene modes, you should be using a compact camera, not a DSLR. Me personally, I found the scene modes on the K100D annoying. I know you can ignore them - just as you can ignore all those features in Microsoft Office that are supposed to make it "easy" but end up getting in your way. ("It looks like you're trying to write a letter! Would you like to view one of our 3000 easy-to-customize templates, created by professional letter writers??")

Now, when I say that the K10D is easier to use, I am certainly not denying that it is also an incredibly sophisticated professional tool. But in my view, when you step up to ANY DSLR these days, you're deal with a potential professional tool. Today's starter DSLR was yesterday's top-of-the-line pro equipment.

Please notice that I'm in no way telling you to buy the K10D. The K100D is a really great camera. A K10D won't make you a better photographer. Heck, getting a DSLR won't make you a better photographer. Some of the best photos I've taken were taken with a compact fixed-lens camera. So if the less expensive camera fits your budget, buy it and don't feel like you're settling for second best.

I'm simply suggesting that, if you're looking for a reason to save yourself the money, don't use the excuse that the K10D is too hard for someone who's never owned a DSLR before. It just isn't true. If you want to save money, do so for its own sake, because saving money is a smart thing to do, or so you can buy more lenses. And remember that the lenses you buy for your K100D (if you go that route) will work just as well on the K10D (or K1d or whatever) that you buy next year.

Hope this helps. Good luck.

Will
06-23-2007, 11:31 PM   #10
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Should a novice get a K10 or a K100? It depends on the beginner, really. The K10 will have a greater learning curve because it has more controls and ways of going about things. A novice SLR user who's not interested in reading the manual could easily get the K10's settings set wrong and get frustrated. On the other hand, if you are the type who reads the manual and systematically goes through the controls on the camera, then a K10 would be very satisfying. It really comes down to how much effort you want to put into learning about photography. I've handed my K100 to my husband (who's never owned a camera in his life and won't read any owners manual) and he's happily snapped away, getting good results. I wouldn't do the same thing with the K10 because it is easier to accidentally change something and get frustrated when it doesn't come out the way you think it should.

I own both the K10 and the K100, and have posted on another forum comparison pictures. When you look at two full frame pictures resized to forum size, they are about the same image quality, and I use both cameras all the time (keep different lenses on them).

If you are interested in learning how to properly use the K10, and it feels better in your hands than the K100 (my opinion is that ergonomics makes a huge difference in a person's enjoyment of a camera), then go for it.
06-24-2007, 06:30 AM   #11
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Buy The K10d!

It can be as simple or complex as you make it. If you leave it on Program and AF it is as automatic as anything out there. For years people bought film slrs that had the same automatic features. Have started 3 beginners out with K10D. All are getting good pictures. All like their cameras. If they didn't they would have returned them.
If it is something you really want you will learn to use it. People do something as complicated and more dangerous every day. Ever say you weren't going to drive a car? Doubtful. If you think of all the things it takes to drive you probably wouldn't drive. Same with a camera don't over analyse it. Just do it. You will love it.
thanks
barondla
p.s. It is just shutter speed, aperture, and focus as already mentioned.
06-24-2007, 08:14 AM   #12
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QuoteOriginally posted by mtngal Quote
Should a novice get a K10 or a K100? It depends on the beginner, really. The K10 will have a greater learning curve because it has more controls and ways of going about things. A novice SLR user who's not interested in reading the manual could easily get the K10's settings set wrong and get frustrated.
I agree that it depends on the beginner - not so much on personality traits, as on just how much of a beginner the person is. See my response above.

However, I do not agree with the idea that the K10D requires that you spend a couple of days poring over the users guide before you start taking pictures, and that the frustration level for beginners is going to be higher on the K10D than on the K100D.

I know that it seems obvious to many that the K10D, which has a richer feature set, MUST for that reason be harder to master, and that harder to master must mean harder for a beginner to get started with. Obvious, but untrue. We're not talking about mastery, we're talking about getting started. I like to focus on specifics.

Three important modes (Tv, Av and M) work on the K10D pretty much the way they work on the K100D. Most people with some experience with a camera beyond the point-and-shoot level know what these modes are for, and will be able to use them immediately on a K10D without taking the manual from its plastic wrapping. In M mode on the K10D, you can use the green button to get the camera's recommendation regarding a proper exposure but that makes things EASIER, not harder. And if you don't know what the green button does at first, well, you can ignore it. But if you try it, it's fairly obvious, I think.

"Green" mode on the K10D is, I think, identical to AUTO on the K100D: fully auto. No frustration there, either. P mode - called "hyperprogram" on the K10D - is a richer feature than P (simple "program" mode) on the K100D, but that doesn't make it harder to use.

TAv is unique to the K10D. You can ignore it, but if you take 2 minutes to look it up in the users guide, the explanation is simple. Set your shutter and aperture and let the camera get a correct exposure by adjusting the ISO.

Now, USER, B and "X" modes on the K10D will (I suspect) send many users - including experienced photographers - to the manual. But again, you can ignore these until your curiosity gets the better of you.

And there are a whole slew of other options in the K10D that are not there in the K100D - two Raw formats, for example, more extensive bracketing options, lots of customization, etc. BUT YOU CAN IGNORE MOST OF THAT until you feel like messing with it. And as far as I can tell, you may never need to mess with much of it. I have taken thousands and thousands of photos with my K10D without bothering to customize the way the buttons work - I like the way they work by default. If your goal was to understand a absolutely every option the camera has to offer, then there may indeed be more to learn about the K10D than about the K100D. But that's not the question here. There's more to learn about the Library of Congress than about the library at a local university - but that doesn't mean that it's any harder for a new patron to find a book in one than in the other.

I do assume that someone spending $1000 on a camera (or close to) isn't afraid of cameras, is willing to spend two or three minutes with the users guide, etc. And it is certainly true that you will get more from your K10D if you study the users guide, practice, etc. But that is true of the K100D, as well, which is hardly a one-trick box camera! The manual for the K100D is nearly as long (at 220 pages) as the manual for the K10D (at 240).

I really would like those who say that the K10D is harder to learn or harder to use than the K100D to give specific examples.

Again, I'm NOT recommending the K10D.

Will
06-24-2007, 09:45 AM   #13
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QuoteOriginally posted by KFrog Quote

I understand the K10D is a serious camera but lately I've become a little concerned about what I've been reading about in reviews of the camera. The common theme is the K10D is for those who take the time to get the most out of it, and that it is not suited for beginners. For me this would be my first DSLR. I have a Canon A80, a fine little P&S, but I want to try my hand at DSLR photography. I'm a complete beginner but I've been reading as much about Pentax DSLR's and lenses as I can get my hands on before I make a purchase.

I guess my basic question is how complex do you think the K10D really is and should I reconsider the K100D?

Thanks.
I will disagree with most of the other replies and suggest that you get the K100D, and invest the money saved in useful accessories. The K100D is a better choice for those who have never used a camera other than a point and shoot, and it gives you all of the creative control of the K10D with a slightly easier learning curve. Your interest in the Tamron super-zoom and your confession of being a "complete beginner" and a "rookie" tells us that is going to be quite a while before you will be using any of the advanced features of the K10D. There is nothing wrong with the K10D and it isn't very hard to learn how to use it. It is just total overkill for your current needs. The feature set of the K100D will cover 100% of your current needs.

Take the money you save on the difference in price between the K100D and the K10D and buy a Pentax dedicated "hot shoe" flash (either the AF-360FGZ or the AF-540FGZ). If you do any indoor flash photography, it will make a huge difference in the quality of your photographs. Another accessory to consider is a decent tripod, as this will greatly improve the quality of landscape, nature and low light photographs.

Most important, get some books on photography technique and spend some time mastering the basics of things like lens focal length, field of view, aperture, depth of field, shutter speed, etc. You also want to learn about composition, lighting and the other ingredients of an interesting photograph. Technique is more important than equipment if you want to take better photographs. Many people are preoccupied with getting the best equipment but never make much effort to learn about photography.

As your technique improves, you will want to consider investing in additional equipment such as specialized lenses to suit your needs. Perhaps an ultra-wide lens, long telephoto, or a fast fixed focal length "prime" lens for low light use or for shallow depth of field.

Last edited by GaryML; 06-24-2007 at 09:55 AM.
06-24-2007, 12:35 PM   #14
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For dSLR noobs: K100D for cost and in-camera JPEG quality ...

QuoteOriginally posted by KFrog Quote
I understand the K10D is a serious camera but lately I've become a little concerned about what I've been reading about in reviews of the camera. The common theme is the K10D is for those who take the time to get the most out of it, and that it is not suited for beginners.
The two (2) big reasons to go K100D are ...
1. Cost, if you're not going to drop money into lenses -- $500 after rebate (in the US) will get you the K100D w/DA 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 "kit" lens plus the DA 50-200mm f/4.0-5.6
2. JPEG, if you want to avoid a lot of post-processing -- the K10D in-camera JPEG image processing could be improved

Now #2 may be improved with newer K10D firmware updates (anyone?). But the K100D drastically improved the in-camera JPEG image processing over the *istD series. I hope to see a K10D successor that does the same over the K10D, for those of us that don't like to shoot too much RAW because we just don't have the time to process everything. In all honesty, I never use the "scene" modes. I play with a little EV, do the bracketing and, infrequently (typically only for incandecent light) change the white balance. I'm typically using either "Program" or "Shutter Priority", with "Aperture Priority" and then "Manual" when appropriate. The "scene" modes are overrated, and you lose basic control IMHO. But I'm sure it's marketed otherwise (and the K10D "looses points" because of it).

The four (4) big reasons to go K10D are ...
1. Brighter pentaprism, makes a huge difference (especially for manual focusing)
2. The controls -- from that second dial (makes all the difference for experts) to the quick RAW/JPEG button (although I'd stick with RAW on the K10D and do the processing)
3. Weather sealed, although you have to get DA* and similar lenses, but you want the K10D if you're going to drop money into lenses anyway
4. Li-Ion rechargeable -- as most people don't like the issues with rechargeable NiMH (I personally think it's manageable) or cost of non-rechargeable Lithium AAs

I really wish the Pentamirror was brighter in my K100D when I try to use manually focused lenses. The Pentaprism in the K10D is much better. Same deal when I start dorking in Manual mode. As far as the controls, the K10D wins expert after expert award because of its "ease of use" with the dual-wheels, the RAW/JPEG button, etc... Another major reason it wins awards is the fact that its weather sealed (with appropriate lenses -- although you can't submerge it in water, more like "running water" resistant), which makes it half (or even more) cheaper than comparable alternatives -- clearly an "expert" with no equal at that price point.

Lastly, if you don't respect the issues with rechargeable NiMH batteries (I do, so I don't mind -- get quality NiMHs, always do a full discharge-recharge and don't let them sit for more than a few weeks), you'll hate the K100D (which draws a crapload of current and a lot of "cheap" 2600mAh batteries are "half" on the K100D's LCD fully charged) and wish you had something with a Li-Ion like the K10D. Although if you're not going to buy extra batteries for the K10D (well worth doing so at only $25), or you forget to pack them, it is nice that the K100D does take and works for a long time with standard, non-rechargeable Lithiums at any store. My advise, get the K10D and drop another $60-80 in extra Li-Ion batteries for taking 1,000-2,000 shots on a trip.

QuoteOriginally posted by KFrog Quote
For me this would be my first DSLR. I have a Canon A80, a fine little P&S, but I want to try my hand at DSLR photography. I'm a complete beginner but I've been reading as much about Pentax DSLR's and lenses as I can get my hands on before I make a purchase.
Then you're in the same boat I was. I was going to buy a superzoom, or near-superzoom, Point'n Shoot for $300-450. I was very close to the Canon IS as well as some of the other options.

But that's when I saw the Pentax rebates -- not just the base rebate, but the $150 when you bought the DA 50-200mm f/4.0-5.6 with it. That was another $50 beyond the base camera and $50 on the lens separately, and brought down the price to $500. Now I originally didn't go for the "kit" 18-55mm f/3.6-5.6 lens, but added it later for $60 (the premium for the kit with the lens is now barely $30 more these days). And Pentax has extended the $150 rebate until end-of-July. The 18-55mm and 50-200mm is the best combination I've seen without dropping $1,000 (let alone only it's $500 after rebate here in the US). I just cannot promote this enough to Point'n Shoot users, and it's been an world-changing experience in performance in a $500, total price, dSLR solution (with shake reduction no less)!

About the only Point'n Shoot users I believe should avoid this is if they think a dSLR will offer a "holy grail" 10x+ superzoom lens. Sorry, image quality is going to suffer. I'd recommend dropping $400 on a compact with at least a 1/1.8" sensor (forget 1/2.5") with a fairly well regarded 10x optical superzoom and, now that it's becoming more commonplace, a 28mm equivalent (to 35mm) at the wide focal. More and more digital compacts can do more than 1fps, closing in on 2fps, although it varies (and still isn't the K100D's 3fps+). The main thing, in addition to image quality (which you're already killing with a 18-200mm or 28-300mm superzoom dSLR lense) is sensitivity, and it will suck for low-light and other situations. But I really don't and can't recommend going dSLR from a Point'n Shoot unless you're willing to change between at least one (1) "wide" lens and one (1) "telezoom" lens.

And I'm saying that as someone who made the jump -- and who even has a few dust bits on his sensor right now after only 5 weeks of use.

QuoteOriginally posted by KFrog Quote
I suspect the K100D is better suited for a rookie but I like the features (weather sealed body especially) and the feel of the K10D better. I had a chance to hold one and take a few snaps with it at Houston Camera Exchange in Houston, TX. A little more weight, good grip and a nicer viewer. I guess my basic question is how complex do you think the K10D really is and should I reconsider the K100D?
QuoteOriginally posted by KFrog Quote
HCE will be a great resource. I asked if they had the Tamron 18-200mm in stock just out of curiosity and they did. That's the lens I would probably start with.
The K10D will give you decent JPEG images if you don't want to post-process. But if you're going to shoot a majority and not process, and you're not going to buy any serious line-up of lenses, I would really push you towards the K100D -- at least until the K10D gets better in-camera JPEG processing (again, do new firmwares do this?).

If you're going to put a superzoom range lens, like a 18-200mm or 28-300mm, then the K10D becomes an utter waste. Then again, I'd argue even the K100D becomes a waste, the lens image quality will not do the sensor justice at all. I learned this myself. Although I tried an older 28-300mm (Tamron model 185D), I also tried the Tamron XR Dii and was also disappointed as well. Some people say the original Tamron XR Di is better, but I don't trust any superzoom to give me any remote image sharpness.

Last edited by bjsmith; 06-24-2007 at 01:19 PM.
06-24-2007, 01:34 PM   #15
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Also check out the Sigma AF 18-125mm f/3.5-5.6 DC

QuoteOriginally posted by bjsmith Quote
But that's when I saw the Pentax rebates -- not just the base rebate, but the $150 when you bought the DA 50-200mm f/4.0-5.6 with it. And Pentax has extended the $150 rebate until end-of-July. The 18-55mm and 50-200mm is the best combination I've seen without dropping $1,000 (let alone only it's $500 after rebate here in the US). I just cannot promote this enough to Point'n Shoot users, and it's been an world-changing experience in performance in a $500, total price, dSLR solution (with shake reduction no less)!
To re-iterate, if you're going to buy a K100D (or K10D for that matter) before the end-of-July, it's really a "no brainer" to buy the DA 50-200mm f/4.0-5.6. It will give you another +$100 in the rebate ($150 total), making the lens a $120 proposition ($70 if you include the rebate you already get with the K100D/K10D) -- one that you can sell for 2x on eBay, making double your money back. It's a lens that can't hurt to have at that price.

QuoteOriginally posted by bjsmith Quote
If you're going to put a superzoom range lens, like a 18-200mm or 28-300mm, then the K10D becomes an utter waste. Then again, I'd argue even the K100D becomes a waste, the lens image quality will not do the sensor justice at all. I learned this myself. Although I tried an older 28-300mm (Tamron model 185D), I also tried the Tamron XR Dii and was also disappointed as well. Some people say the original Tamron XR Di is better, but I don't trust any superzoom to give me any remote image sharpness.
IIRC, the newer Tamron XR Dii is APS-C sized and smaller than the original XR Di. But I've also heard it sucks compared to it. Many people like the larger XR Di better, although it's -- again -- large.

If you're really stuck on an inexpensive, single lens Superzoom, are you willing to go down to 18-125mm? If so, the Sigma AF 18-125mm f/3.5-5.6 DC -- DC = Sigma's APS-C sized (equivalent to Pentax's DA designation) -- runs around $230. The PhotoZone review came out (on the Pentax K10D) just a few weeks ago, and had it been out when I bought my K100D, I would have probably just gone for it instead of trying out different lenses (including skipping the +$60 DA 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 "kit").
Sigma AF 18-125mm f/3.5-5.6 DC (Pentax K) - Photozone Review / Lab Test Report

With a range of 18-125mm, you're already getting a 7x, and you might want to just skip on the DA 50-200mm then (or buy it and sell it later, or sooner for that matter). Especially if you opt for the $500 Sigma 135-400mm at some point for increased range (and the 50-200mm almost becomes redundant).

Last edited by bjsmith; 06-24-2007 at 01:40 PM.
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