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05-03-2010, 08:55 PM   #31
krb
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QuoteOriginally posted by borno Quote
He does look like it might be the same guy. There is more room on the new walkway than it looks. Fishermen used to crowd the catwalk on the dam, but they closed it after 9-11. Instead of hiring a couple security guys they spent millions on a new concrete fishing area. It is nice though, and handicap accessible. I have better luck getting good Eagle shots a little down the shore usually. Right after the sun gets up is usually good for me.
Yeah, it really is a great place to shoot. Plenty of room on the concrete area in the pics and all along the river towards where the pics are taken from. Parking right there so you don't have to walk too far, public restrooms, sun at your back and plenty of eagles to shoot.

05-10-2010, 07:54 AM   #32
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My gut reaction would have been to start shooting pictures of the crowd, including detail shots of the expensive optical setups people were using.

Crowds ruin everything, don't they? I'm sorry to hear this was so frustrating for you. If I'm ever in your way I'll let you squeeze in, promise!
05-10-2010, 03:50 PM   #33
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I guess I am sort of lucky. When things get tight, it is not unusual for photographers in my region to rotate through the "best" vantage points. This last fall there were about a dozen of us trying to "work" a couple of the more colorful trees at the Japanese gardens in Portland. Each of us would wait for the person ahead of us and, when given a chance, would drop in with the tripod, take our shots, and move back to let another person in. I would generally take another look at the subject, get in line and give it another go if I thought the subject needed another round.

The same is true at the various waterfalls near here. The official vantage points are the obvious places to start a photo session, but space is usually pretty tight if you are working with a tripod. Again, people are usually pretty good about grabbing their shot and moving on to other places.

Birding? We are lucky in these parts to have a good variety of birds at multiple locations with lots of different species moving through in each season. Despite there being many bird photographers locally, I don't think that I have ever witnessed a mob scene at a blind or viewing area.

Steve
05-12-2010, 06:03 PM   #34
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QuoteOriginally posted by unixrevolution Quote
My gut reaction would have been to start shooting pictures of the crowd, including detail shots of the expensive optical setups people were using.

Crowds ruin everything, don't they? I'm sorry to hear this was so frustrating for you. If I'm ever in your way I'll let you squeeze in, promise!
I suppose I am a loner when I go out with my photo gear.
I even get annoyed when I meet one or two people on the trails!
Well, this was my first encounter with a "large" crowd of photographers and I don't think I will ever get myself in that sort of "trouble".
Cheers.

JP

05-12-2010, 06:09 PM   #35
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QuoteOriginally posted by stevebrot Quote
I guess I am sort of lucky. When things get tight, it is not unusual for photographers in my region to rotate through the "best" vantage points. This last fall there were about a dozen of us trying to "work" a couple of the more colorful trees at the Japanese gardens in Portland. Each of us would wait for the person ahead of us and, when given a chance, would drop in with the tripod, take our shots, and move back to let another person in. I would generally take another look at the subject, get in line and give it another go if I thought the subject needed another round.

The same is true at the various waterfalls near here. The official vantage points are the obvious places to start a photo session, but space is usually pretty tight if you are working with a tripod. Again, people are usually pretty good about grabbing their shot and moving on to other places.

Birding? We are lucky in these parts to have a good variety of birds at multiple locations with lots of different species moving through in each season. Despite there being many bird photographers locally, I don't think that I have ever witnessed a mob scene at a blind or viewing area.

Steve
Hi Steve.
I agree with you being in one of the best birding spot in the country, save for Point Pelee National Park perhaps.
My son lives in Vancouver and is an avid outdoors goer: mountain climbing, cave "descending" ( ), and all kinds of crazy extreme stuff ... anyway, he's also a bit of a photographer. Some of his photos are to die for!
You are very lucky to live in such a great place!

JP
05-18-2010, 07:01 PM   #36
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QuoteOriginally posted by jpzk Quote
One morning this week: perfect weather for a planned outing to the National Park about one hour away from my place.
The plan: get to the park observatory where one can admire/photograph the several species of birds of prey coming in the St Lawrence River valley during Spring migration. (eagles, hawks, etc...)

After a short drive off the main highway, you get to the parking area: full! Nowhere to park the car! Gotta back up and find a spot. Gotta walk up to the observatory now.
I take by beloved Pentax gear out: tripod, K7, K20D, and of course my DA*300/4 with a 1.7X Pentax adapter ... that should be enough to get me some half decent shots of the flying birds.
Gotta find a spot to install my stuff now ... of course, there are at least 12 to 15 photographers and a bunch more of people with fancy ornithology "surveillance equipment" already in place, at the best spots. No way to get close to the edge of the cliff (which is fenced for security reasons) because of that.
I set up my gear ... behind everyone, try to get a little closer so at least I can see some of the scenery ... no chance: nobody moves even half an inch.
Among monster-size white Canon and Nikon lenses, gimball heads and huge Swarovski "digiscopes", my attempts to get closer are futile.
One very "nice" lady asked me what sort/brand of camera I had; she had this puzzled look on her face as if my photo gear was some sort of "whatever".
"Pentax" I said.
"Oh!" she said, and turned back to her observing business.
I even gently asked if I could "squeeze in" ... no dice! Would you believe that? "We are already quite squeezed" someone tells me.
"I'll wait until someone leaves, that's OK", I said.
"You might have to wait all day", another fellow answers.

OK, ... I'm going back home. This is it! No more of this!

Drove back home; one hour drive again and pissed off.
No pictures either.

I feel good now that I have vented my frustration.

JP
I find in situations like this that those photographers become the wildlife, and you have an opportunity to get some candid shots of the 'local fauna' in action.
05-19-2010, 09:51 AM   #37
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QuoteOriginally posted by alohadave Quote
I find in situations like this that those photographers become the wildlife, and you have an opportunity to get some candid shots of the 'local fauna' in action.
I should have taken some pics of this human fauna, yes, but I was really annoyed and didn't think a bout that. I doubt the opportunity will present itself again though. :ugh:
JP
06-11-2010, 04:27 PM   #38
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I'm on the short side, personally. If I waited for anyone out there to give me a better viewing spot the only thing I'd ever likely see most of the time is the the backs of the 50 people in front of me. You know how I deal with it? I carry a good sturdy crate with me and I get right up on it standing directly behind the crowd. End result I get a better view anyhow, and I can take my pics and see regardless of how many people are standing in front of me.

If they don't like it TOUGH. They can give me all the nasty looks in the world. I don't particularly care. If they were nice enough to let the very short person get to where she could see in the first place I wouldn't even need to get up on a wooden box.

Fact, probably 99% of the people on this planet over the age of 18 can shoot pics just fine OVER me, and yet it always seems that not one of these taller people will ever let me actually stand below them where I can. I simply won't do that, be handicapped because I am only 5 foot and an inch or two, caught in a sea of much taller people. If they are so rude they can't even make a place for me, than I'm going to do what I can to make up the difference between my height and theirs.

I may look utterly amusing and stupid carting a wooden box, but I'll still get my view and my pics despite them.

Get a box or stool or whatever you need, go back and screw em!

Enough said.

06-16-2010, 05:12 PM   #39
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QuoteOriginally posted by magkelly Quote
I'm on the short side, personally. If I waited for anyone out there to give me a better viewing spot the only thing I'd ever likely see most of the time is the the backs of the 50 people in front of me. You know how I deal with it? I carry a good sturdy crate with me and I get right up on it standing directly behind the crowd. End result I get a better view anyhow, and I can take my pics and see regardless of how many people are standing in front of me.

If they don't like it TOUGH. They can give me all the nasty looks in the world. I don't particularly care. If they were nice enough to let the very short person get to where she could see in the first place I wouldn't even need to get up on a wooden box.

Fact, probably 99% of the people on this planet over the age of 18 can shoot pics just fine OVER me, and yet it always seems that not one of these taller people will ever let me actually stand below them where I can. I simply won't do that, be handicapped because I am only 5 foot and an inch or two, caught in a sea of much taller people. If they are so rude they can't even make a place for me, than I'm going to do what I can to make up the difference between my height and theirs.

I may look utterly amusing and stupid carting a wooden box, but I'll still get my view and my pics despite them.

Get a box or stool or whatever you need, go back and screw em!

Enough said.
... with my short stature, I might just try your suggestion!
Cheers.
JP
06-20-2010, 06:57 AM   #40
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Use a monopod with a remote shutter release. Hold it over the crowd and take some shots. You could move the monopod at different angles. Doing this should result in some keepers and you get a different view than everybody else.
06-22-2010, 08:49 PM   #41
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QuoteOriginally posted by McG Quote
Use a monopod with a remote shutter release. Hold it over the crowd and take some shots. You could move the monopod at different angles. Doing this should result in some keepers and you get a different view than everybody else.
Never thought of that!
Maybe if I decide to test the observatory again ... this may be a long shot but I do appreciate the idea!

JP
06-24-2010, 11:16 AM   #42
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QuoteOriginally posted by jpzk Quote
One morning this week: perfect weather for a planned outing to the National Park about one hour away from my place.
The plan: get to the park observatory where one can admire/photograph the several species of birds of prey coming in the St Lawrence River valley during Spring migration. (eagles, hawks, etc...)

After a short drive off the main highway, you get to the parking area: full! Nowhere to park the car! Gotta back up and find a spot. Gotta walk up to the observatory now.
I take by beloved Pentax gear out: tripod, K7, K20D, and of course my DA*300/4 with a 1.7X Pentax adapter ... that should be enough to get me some half decent shots of the flying birds.
Gotta find a spot to install my stuff now ... of course, there are at least 12 to 15 photographers and a bunch more of people with fancy ornithology "surveillance equipment" already in place, at the best spots. No way to get close to the edge of the cliff (which is fenced for security reasons) because of that.
I set up my gear ... behind everyone, try to get a little closer so at least I can see some of the scenery ... no chance: nobody moves even half an inch.
Among monster-size white Canon and Nikon lenses, gimball heads and huge Swarovski "digiscopes", my attempts to get closer are futile.
One very "nice" lady asked me what sort/brand of camera I had; she had this puzzled look on her face as if my photo gear was some sort of "whatever".
"Pentax" I said.
"Oh!" she said, and turned back to her observing business.
I even gently asked if I could "squeeze in" ... no dice! Would you believe that? "We are already quite squeezed" someone tells me.
"I'll wait until someone leaves, that's OK", I said.
"You might have to wait all day", another fellow answers.

OK, ... I'm going back home. This is it! No more of this!

Drove back home; one hour drive again and pissed off.
No pictures either.

I feel good now that I have vented my frustration.

JP
you should go there on a rainy day and you are gone have the whole spot for yourself
most canikons do not like rain at all - i found out

or get a pentax 600 - it makes all other 600 looking like a still-growing-version
https://www.pentaxforums.com/forums/pentax-slr-lens-discussion/86756-real-size-f*-600mm-4-a.html
06-24-2010, 11:59 AM   #43
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QuoteQuote:
Next time just start "accidentally" bumping into them each time they are about to take a shot.
A whoopee cushion hidden in your armpit can also create a little working room.
06-24-2010, 12:46 PM   #44
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I understand your frustration and I've been on the other side of the equation, too. I'm not a hardcore nature photographer but have friends who are and have listened to them often enough to understand their point of view. And I've been taken advantage of when moving out of my carefully chosen spot. Look at it like this: If I stand in line for concert tickets, I'm not going to take less desirable seats because someone else came late and feels left out.

You make the effort to get to someplace early. You carefully choose your spot. Then people casually show up later and want to move you. I've said yes often enough to realize that as often as not, they will actually set up in front and ruin your field of view. Now that's really annoying, doing someone a favor just to have them ruin your shots.

Serious nature photographers get out into the field early, often before dawn. If it's a public viewing area that means waiting at the gate for it to open. It's not a matter of big lenses or big name cameras. It's respecting those who are just as serious. They consider those who arrive late and come and go as annoyances, which they are.
06-24-2010, 12:54 PM   #45
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QuoteOriginally posted by jpzk Quote
I suppose I am a loner when I go out with my photo gear.
I even get annoyed when I meet one or two people on the trails!
Which brings me to my point, which is perhaps playing devils advocate a bit: (with regards to different skill levels, focal lengths, ideas for images etc) why would you want to be taking photos amongst a group of photographers? If someone (or lots of people) can get the same photo as you, I don't get the point; it's captured and I lose all interest. Something about groups of photographers makes me want to go a mile in the opposite direction.
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