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05-03-2010, 09:10 PM   #31
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90% handheld
5% tripod
5% balanced on trashcans, cars, bricks, lenscaps, tubes of lipgloss, etc. etc.

I'm serious about the lipgloss. I had my camera on the ground with the lipgloss under the zoom ring of the 12-24 to get the camera angled upward for this shot:



05-03-2010, 09:17 PM   #32
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What's a tripod?
05-03-2010, 09:20 PM   #33
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QuoteOriginally posted by K McCall Quote

Awesome shot!
05-04-2010, 06:25 AM   #34
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thats a great shot! do you have an online portfolio? where can i see more of your work?

05-04-2010, 06:34 AM   #35
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Mule.

(Keitha--love that!!!)
05-04-2010, 08:46 AM   #36
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Thanks, guys!

Portfolio: A Scenic World Portfolio
05-04-2010, 12:01 PM   #37
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I use a Tripod for night scenes, long-exposures, and macro photography. For basically everything else, I go handheld.

If you have SR, make sure it's turned on and set properly (if you have a Manual lens on your camera, you'll have to tell it what focal length it is.)

Also, could be the way you hold it. If you're an experienced shooter you can of course ignore this bit, but here goes:

Try holding your camera with one hand under the lens barrel, the other on the grip with your finger on the shutter. Support most of the weight with the hand under the lens. When you take a picture, press, don't jab, the shutter button lightly until it releases.

Another thing is that you may wish to force shutter speeds up. A good rule of thumb when shooting handheld is that your shutter speed should be the reciprocal of your focal length or faster; If you have a 135mm lens mounted, your shutter speeds should be 1/135th or faster (higher numbers.) If you just can't get the shutter speed you want, force a higher ISO out of the camera or buy a faster lens.

Hope this helps!
05-04-2010, 01:52 PM   #38
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QuoteOriginally posted by unixrevolution Quote
Also, could be the way you hold it. If you're an experienced shooter you can of course ignore this bit, but here goes:

Try holding your camera with one hand under the lens barrel, the other on the grip with your finger on the shutter. Support most of the weight with the hand under the lens. When you take a picture, press, don't jab, the shutter button lightly until it releases.

Another thing is that you may wish to force shutter speeds up. A good rule of thumb when shooting handheld is that your shutter speed should be the reciprocal of your focal length or faster; If you have a 135mm lens mounted, your shutter speeds should be 1/135th or faster (higher numbers.) If you just can't get the shutter speed you want, force a higher ISO out of the camera or buy a faster lens.

Hope this helps!
Those are good tips. Some other things to try too:

-Bring your elbows in against your chest/torso.
-Brace your nose/forehead against the back of the camera.
-Try squeezing the shutter button.
-Breathe in, then breathe out halfway while triggering the shutter.
-Brace the camera against any solid object, including your knee, a rock, telephone pole.
-Take multiple exposures (if possible). If you shoot JPG, the biggest JPG will often be the sharpest.

I often shoot 1/4 to 1/30s exposures and get halfway decent results with careful handholding techniques.

05-06-2010, 05:56 AM   #39
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I'd like to see some landscape shot, or in-town shot between a Handheld or a Monopod to see if there is any differences ?

anybody know where to find that ? or had somes
05-06-2010, 10:40 AM   #40
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With a DSLR, about 90% hand held. If it is a tripod situation, I am more likely to use another kind of camera.
05-06-2010, 11:49 AM   #41
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QuoteOriginally posted by anthers Quote
Those are good tips. Some other things to try too:

-Bring your elbows in against your chest/torso.
-Brace your nose/forehead against the back of the camera.
-Try squeezing the shutter button.
-Breathe in, then breathe out halfway while triggering the shutter.
-Brace the camera against any solid object, including your knee, a rock, telephone pole.
-Take multiple exposures (if possible). If you shoot JPG, the biggest JPG will often be the sharpest.

I often shoot 1/4 to 1/30s exposures and get halfway decent results with careful handholding techniques.
I also get good results from about 1/4 up, when I haven't had 3 energy drinks and chocolate covered espresso beans.

These tips are excellent, and are almost the same tips you get about shooting rifles offhand at long-range targets. The main thing is to exhale before you shoot, and to make your bone structure, rather than your muscles, what's primarily holding the camera up.

Found a couple good guides on holding technique:

How to Reduce Camera Shake – 6 Techniques

Shooting Positions For Your Digital SLR
05-06-2010, 12:55 PM   #42
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QuoteOriginally posted by anthers Quote
Those are good tips. Some other things to try too:

-Bring your elbows in against your chest/torso.
-Brace your nose/forehead against the back of the camera.
-Try squeezing the shutter button.
-Breathe in, then breathe out halfway while triggering the shutter.
-Brace the camera against any solid object, including your knee, a rock, telephone pole.
-Take multiple exposures (if possible). If you shoot JPG, the biggest JPG will often be the sharpest.

I often shoot 1/4 to 1/30s exposures and get halfway decent results with careful handholding techniques.
These are quite good tips. Thanks. For anyone using longish lenses, examine the second image carefully. Notice that the camera is not pointing straight ahead, but to the left side. Here are some ideas on finding your personal perfect posture.

  1. Set your feet a little more than shoulder width apart
  2. Put your left hand fingers on the zoom/focus ring that you will use, palm up - grip from beneath the lens so that you can:
  3. Sit the camera body in the palm of your left hand. For very long lenses, the tripod shoe will work.
  4. Raise the camera to your eye - whichever you normally use
  5. Put your right hand in shooting position on the camera.
  6. Close both eyes - yes! - yes! - yes! - I mean it!
  7. Pull your left elbow in tight to your body
  8. Pull your right elbow in - it will probably end up on your chest near the bottom of your rib cage. I have a comfortable shelf growing in this position. We never stop growing; only the direction changes. <G>
  9. Get as comfortable as possible - no strain - relax your whole body while still keeping your eyelid glued to the viewfinder.
  10. Shrug and wiggle for a minute or so.
  11. Open your eyes: you are in the best holding position for you in the standing position.
05-06-2010, 08:30 PM   #43
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Other than for non-critical (in terms of image quality) quick snaps, I use a tripod all the time. I don't have very steady hands, and my results hand held never compare with tripod mounted shots, period.
05-10-2010, 01:22 AM   #44
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I shoot handheld most of the time. I have a tripod but never used it yet on my K-x yet.

I used the tripod on my K-1000 but only for self photograph to take my picture when I travel alone when nobody will take my picture.
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