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The right type of M42-to-K-mount adaptor
Posted By: dosdan, 01-18-2010, 05:18 AM

There are two types of M42-to-K-mount adaptor:

  • The Flange type
  • The Recessed type

Don't be like me and get the wrong type, which is the Flange type. While the flange type is cheap, is commonly available and the flange appears thin, it is still thick enough to prevent focus at infinity.

Get the recessed type. I've got a "Roxsen" 3rd-party version. This is very easy to fit on a K100D Super body, but I find it is difficult to fit or remove this quickly on a K20D. The genuine Pentax M42 recessed adaptor is reported to be easier to fit compared to 3rd-party adaptors.


Here's some pictures I took showing the difference between the two M42-to-K-mount adaptors.

Recessed-type adapter plus insertion/removal key on left Flange-type on right. Both showing the side that fits to the camera:



Flange-type fitted:






Recessed-type fitted:


Dan.

Last edited by dosdan; 01-18-2010 at 12:53 PM.
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06-25-2016, 01:30 PM   #16
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QuoteOriginally posted by vonBaloney Quote
Interesting -- might have to pick one of those up. But to be fair, not many lenses need the aperture pin held down (Takumars don't, in general) because most have a switch and if they do have a switch I don't want it held down as it is nice to be able to flip the switch back to wide-open. The issue with narrow-based lenses is usually more about light-leaks than wobble. Most of my m42s end up with a semi-permanent cheapo adapter with the spring removed so I can use them like K-mounts, but the genuine adapter is good to have around for testing and lesser-used lenses. (I make sure to have one in my bag if I'm going anywhere where I might be looking at old used lenses so I can try them out without danger.)
I think a lot of the Russian and East German lenses were made (and maybe are still being made) without an A/M switch. There is a lot of strange bokeh fun to be had with those. Also, a lot of these lenses are old. I have a 105mm Soligor with a broken A/M switch, a not unusual occurrence for a lens from the 1970's. So for me this adapter gives some versatility and does not require lens surgery. If you did do an adapter per lens, the Kipon is $23 at Adorama (vs. $59 for the Pentax genuine). Only downside is the the Kipon needs a tool for adapter removal, but that is not an issue for my K30.

06-25-2016, 01:36 PM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by kernos Quote
I think a lot of the Russian and East German lenses were made (and maybe are still being made) without an A/M switch.
Yeah, there is a definite subset that has the pin and no switch (Fujinons & Yashinons among the Japanese lenses as well), but most either have both or neither. MInor surgery or just gluing the pin down is usually no big deal either.
07-09-2016, 06:14 AM   #18
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Years ago I bristled at the thought of paying $35 for a genuine Pentax adapter and got an inexpensive Bower, which looks almost exactly the same but comes with the fitting tool.

After many years the clip began to fail, and I got it stuck a few times. Finally I bought the genuine Pentax adapter from Amazon. The price, of course, has crept up to $50 since I bought the Bower.

What a difference! Whereas the Bower could only be reliably attached by attaching it to the lens first, the Pentax clicks right into the body, making lens changes so much faster and easier. The Pentax looks like a part of the body when it's in place.

It's been said many times before, and I wish I had listened long ago, but there really is no substitute for the genuine Pentax Adapter K.
08-11-2016, 06:55 AM   #19
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So I have one of the Pentax adapters. It's a nice adapter... but it makes me sad that it doesn't have some kind of plate in it to contact the aperture pin, to stop down the lenses attached. Am I missing something obvious? I'd love to use my zenit 16mm on my k3, but don't think it's possible without some lens surgery, it would be so nice if the adapter did this.

08-11-2016, 07:04 AM   #20
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QuoteOriginally posted by bobbotron Quote
So I have one of the Pentax adapters. It's a nice adapter... but it makes me sad that it doesn't have some kind of plate in it to contact the aperture pin, to stop down the lenses attached. Am I missing something obvious? I'd love to use my zenit 16mm on my k3, but don't think it's possible without some lens surgery, it would be so nice if the adapter did this.
There are adapters you can get like that (see above), but it is not needed for the Takumar (Pentax) lenses the official one is officially designed for, otherwise I suppose it would have been made that way.
08-19-2017, 02:20 PM   #21
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I realize this is an old thread but I now find myself in the position of having to buy one or more adapters for some M42 SMC Super-Tak lenses that were gifted to me (and all are excellent quality according to the lens database up here). But I'm slightly confused about how the adapter should be used. I have a K5IIs and I'd prefer the adapter stay sort-of permanently attached to the back of the lens and simply bayonet it on to the camera when I want to use that lens; then push the release button on the camera body to "bayonet" it back off. (I'd buy multiple adapters - one for each lens.) The body flange always stays as K-Mount and you'd never see the adapter residing on the body without a lens. Is this possible or even advisable? (I ask simply because earlier in the thread there is at least one post that indicates the "correct" way of using the adapter is to leave it on the body and simply screw in the desired lens.

As well—and I hope I'm being paranoid—there seems to be some mention about the adapter becoming stuck on the body because of some part that might break (on the adapter). Did I misunderstand this?

Thanks!

Barry
08-19-2017, 02:37 PM   #22
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QuoteOriginally posted by rumplestiltskin Quote
I realize this is an old thread but I now find myself in the position of having to buy one or more adapters for some M42 SMC Super-Tak lenses that were gifted to me (and all are excellent quality according to the lens database up here). But I'm slightly confused about how the adapter should be used. I have a K5IIs and I'd prefer the adapter stay sort-of permanently attached to the back of the lens and simply bayonet it on to the camera when I want to use that lens; then push the release button on the camera body to "bayonet" it back off. (I'd buy multiple adapters - one for each lens.) The body flange always stays as K-Mount and you'd never see the adapter residing on the body without a lens. Is this possible or even advisable? (I ask simply because earlier in the thread there is at least one post that indicates the "correct" way of using the adapter is to leave it on the body and simply screw in the desired lens.

As well—and I hope I'm being paranoid—there seems to be some mention about the adapter becoming stuck on the body because of some part that might break (on the adapter). Did I misunderstand this?
If you buy the genuine Pentax adapter, it is somewhat loosey-goosey (by design) and is best used staying on the camera body (leave the locking spring alone). If you buy any other third-party copy of this type (meaning one that stays flush to the body mount without an external flange), then immediately remove the locking spring thing before you use it. YOU WILL REGRET IT IF YOU LEAVE THAT THING ON. Now your adapter can be screwed on the lens and left there. It achieves a friction fit when mounted bayonet style on the body (meaning it can fall off if you turn it accidentally, but most lenses are pretty snug). The locking button on the camera never comes into play with any of these adapters -- you're either unscrewing the lens or unmounting it bayonet style as usual. If the adapter is snug on the lens and you want to get it off, use a rear lens cap as a wrench.
08-19-2017, 04:38 PM   #23
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A-ha! Well, -that's- a nice kettle of fish, as the saying goes. It sounds like the locking spring thingy (even on the genuine Pentax adapter) is not to be trusted as it could fall off inside the camera; and, on the third-party type, it's an almost inevitable accident waiting to happen.

Maybe I'll just sell these four lenses (28mmF3.5, 50mmF1.8, 135mmF3.5, and a Spiratone 85mmF1.8) and get one really good KAF lens.

Thanks,
Barry

08-19-2017, 08:17 PM   #24
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QuoteOriginally posted by rumplestiltskin Quote
A-ha! Well, -that's- a nice kettle of fish, as the saying goes. It sounds like the locking spring thingy (even on the genuine Pentax adapter) is not to be trusted as it could fall off inside the camera; and, on the third-party type, it's an almost inevitable accident waiting to happen.

Maybe I'll just sell these four lenses (28mmF3.5, 50mmF1.8, 135mmF3.5, and a Spiratone 85mmF1.8) and get one really good KAF lens.
On the genuine adapter, is is perfectly safe and can be trusted, it is just the adapter moves around in the mount a bit (before you screw a lens tight on it) -- this is on purpose and it just works better on the camera. Also the real ones are much too pricey to be buying one for every lens anyway. So if you are using m42s alot, you'll want a genuine one to have around, but if you just have a couple m42s you're better off with cheap third-party ones. The third-party ones are typically much tighter in the mount and if you don't get rid of that springy thing, you will have a thing stuck to your camera at some point that is near impossible to get off. Just take it off and forget about it. Neither one is going to drop anything inside your camera body -- that's not a thing. (All of this will be much more obvious if you had it in your hand, the main thing is just with the third-party adapters to take that thing off before it gets anywhere near a lens or your camera or you will regret it, I promise.)

Last edited by vonBaloney; 08-20-2017 at 01:11 PM.
08-19-2017, 09:22 PM   #25
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Von (Baloney?),
Thanks for your detailed explanation. It makes sense.

Barry
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