Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
03-29-2015, 09:23 PM   #76
Veteran Member
Christine Tham's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Sydney, Australia
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 2,269
QuoteOriginally posted by Rondec Quote
Interesting.

My wife is a professional photographer (not because we need the money, but because she enjoys doing it) and she never lacks for work. Probably Australia is a different market, where folks have moved on from things like still photos and art and crap like that.

For me, from a personal standpoint, I value still photographs and will gladly pay professionals to document important moments in both mine and my children's lives, as it is warranted.
Good for you and your wife.

I am sure there are photographers who enjoy their work and make a decent income out of it, and I certainly hope that many do.

But the stats are rather depressing. On average, a photographer earns about $25 an hour (based on one survey I read) - that's at the same level as the minimum wage for menial workers (eg. contract cleaners). And the trend is going downwards - photographers as a profession are earning less than less every year. That's the paradigm shift I am referring to, and we see it every day (more recently, major publications sacking their staff photographers).

Yes, there are photographers earning $150k+ a year, but these are very much a minority. The stats show more than 75% of photographers earn less than $50 an hour. These are people who list photography as their main profession, and do not include those who do it as a side business. We are talking about net incomes, not gross. There are quite high costs associated with running a photography business - studio rentals, equipment, lighting, paper, printing etc. not to mention marketing. Some photographers I know make more money from running workshops and organised travel than actually doing photography.

For me, I will never pay for a photographer, just like I will never pay for a chaffeur to drive my car, and I almost never pay for taxis. I just don't believe in paying someone to do something that I (and my friends) would prefer to do ourselves. Maybe I don't value photographs as much as you seem to - and that's okay (for both of us).

Maybe it's a generational thing. My mother in law once suggested that the whole extended family dress up and go to a studio to take a photograph that we can all treasure. All of us "kids" were dead set against it - we felt it was a waste of money and we persuaded her it was better to dress up and we take the photos ourselves. She seemed okay with it - reflecting on it now and your post, maybe we should have done what she suggested - but it was interesting that our reaction was universally "ugh! why would anyone waste their money for a studio shot?"


Last edited by Christine Tham; 03-29-2015 at 09:55 PM.
03-29-2015, 10:51 PM   #77
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
noelpolar's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Goolwa, SA
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 4,250
QuoteOriginally posted by Rondec Quote
Interesting.
Probably Australia is a different market, where folks have moved on from things like still photos and art and crap like that.
For me, from a personal standpoint, I value still photographs and will gladly pay professionals to document important moments in both mine and my children's lives, as it is warranted.
Australia is not that different......I have found that many average people (ie not photographically inclined) seek out cheap photo solutions (ie a friend) for their special occasions....more and more these days.....but when presented with, lets say, more professionally taken shots, they go wow!
03-29-2015, 11:10 PM   #78
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
RGlasel's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Saskatoon
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 2,976
QuoteOriginally posted by Christine Tham Quote
Maybe it's a generational thing
No, it's more of a combination of where individuals are in their own life cycle and how individuals view themselves within a community context. Wherever there exists a middle class, most people want to pay for a professional recording of their wedding, early milestones of their children and family trees before some of the branches die. What I have seen is that people who want to record more mundane portions of their lives, to remind themselves of their self-image, tend to take matters into their own hands. That tendency has been pushed to the extreme with the smartphone selfie. I'm not arguing with your general portrayal of professional photography as a declining industry, but that decline is limited to specific niches. There are also more photographers with expensive equipment who fancy themselves as professionals than there are opportunities for professional photographers to earn a good living, so the market is adjusting supply and demand with price.

---------- Post added 03-30-15 at 12:16 AM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by noelpolar Quote
seek out cheap photo solutions
QuoteOriginally posted by noelpolar Quote
.but when presented with, lets say, more professionally taken shots, they go wow!
Yup, when consumers can't visualize the benefits of buying quality, they default to looking for cheaper because they have little confidence that spending more will provide more value. For most products and services, two things contribute to this perception. One, the cost of getting something universally accepted as superiour is very high, relative to the least expensive option, and simply unaffordable for most; and two, the consumer doesn't trust whoever is providing the product or service.
03-29-2015, 11:42 PM   #79
Veteran Member
Christine Tham's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Sydney, Australia
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 2,269
QuoteOriginally posted by RGlasel Quote
No, it's more of a combination of where individuals are in their own life cycle and how individuals view themselves within a community context. Wherever there exists a middle class, most people want to pay for a professional recording of their wedding, early milestones of their children and family trees before some of the branches die. What I have seen is that people who want to record more mundane portions of their lives, to remind themselves of their self-image, tend to take matters into their own hands. That tendency has been pushed to the extreme with the smartphone selfie. I'm not arguing with your general portrayal of professional photography as a declining industry, but that decline is limited to specific niches. There are also more photographers with expensive equipment who fancy themselves as professionals than there are opportunities for professional photographers to earn a good living, so the market is adjusting supply and demand with price.
Well, that's an unsubstantiated generalisation.

I could equally argue that the ability for an average person to create a photo of acceptable quality (cameras getting better, access to easy to use processing tools etc.), and the lack of pro photographers who are truly able to differentiate themselves from amateurs in terms of final output quality, are driving the trend.

And anyway, who are we to judge what is or isn't important in someone's lives? Someone talking a selfie of themselves at graduation day on a smartphone, is that more "mundane" than a family going for a studio glamour shot with no particular event to commemorate? Both are arguably taking a photo to "remind themselves of their self image."

I know someone who keeps a running album of her "happiest moments" on Facebook. Yes, there are quite a few photos of her and her boyfriend, family, vacation but there are also lots of selfies and photos of food. Are these mundane moments? Not to her - she has carefully curated them as photos she is particularly fond of and proud of. Are you going to judge her as a lesser human being because she doesn't meet your standards of what a "milestone" should be?

I for one would not want to pay for a "professional recording" of my wedding. We did 25 years ago, and I can't say I was particularly impressed with the results. I don't even know where our wedding photo album is. Probably lost. Good riddance. I am happier with the photos my partner takes of me today on our camera(s) than the "professionally shot" photos from yesteryear.

03-30-2015, 01:54 AM   #80
Veteran Member




Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Flyover America
Posts: 4,469
QuoteOriginally posted by interested_observer Quote
Canon EOS 5DS DSLR - 50MP with/without AA
50mp - wow!
Surely with 50mp I won't be taking dull uninteresting banal images anymore.
A least with a 50mp sensor they will be tack sharp dull uninteresting banal images.

Last edited by wildman; 03-30-2015 at 02:10 AM.
03-30-2015, 02:55 AM - 1 Like   #81
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
Digitalis's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Adelaide.
Posts: 10,226
QuoteOriginally posted by Christine Tham Quote
Digitalis has been in my Ignore list for years, but I kinda feel sorry for him.
It is impossible to defeat an ignorant man in argument. ~William G. McAdoo

QuoteOriginally posted by Christine Tham Quote
But the stats are rather depressing. On average, a photographer earns about $25 an hour (based on one survey I read) - that's at the same level as the minimum wage for menial workers (eg. contract cleaners). And the trend is going downwards - photographers as a profession are earning less than less every year. That's the paradigm shift I am referring to, and we see it every day (more recently, major publications sacking their staff photographers).
"There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies, and statistics" - Mark Twain(Probably*)

I want citations on this, and also the sample size this survey was taken from. I'm independent from the AIPP, but from what I know: from my Adelaide based colleagues which are members the price bracket is $250~$550 an hour. Many of them are working freelance and are presently employed as photographers. Major publications are sacking their photography staff (Most of the good publications are simply outsourcing it) because of the existence of camera phones and compact cameras that even a primate can use. Unfortunately the quality of published photos and editorials are absolute rubbish, some people just don't know the art of lighting their subjects.

QuoteOriginally posted by Christine Tham Quote
"Pro" photographers like to think of themselves as F1 drivers - the top of their craft delivering results at the podium. The reality is that they are more like chauffeurs - hired to push a button to deliver someone else's outcome.
"Photography is a tough life: you can be taken, framed, exposed, shot, captured, and hung all in the same day." ~Sam Abbel

F1 drivers drive regular cars too you know, they certainly can't drive their F1 car to school to pick up the kids*. Every now and then a professional photographer gets chosen to help realize the defining image of a fashion campaign, work on a movie set of a big budget feature, get to document a major event or shoot Haute couture for one of the major fashion houses. I make a good living of my work as a professional photographic instructor as well as my freelance work, but it isn't a consistent profession. I also work in business administration and management when my photographic skills are not in demand - I'm also furthering my studies in classical music under the tutelage of the principal players in my state symphony orchestra. Most artists have day jobs, thought there are some that can make a comfortable living from their work. Though there are others who lack the skills or ability to do so, there are ways for them to get by.

QuoteOriginally posted by Christine Tham Quote
I for one would not want to pay for a "professional recording" of my wedding. We did 25 years ago, and I can't say I was particularly impressed with the results. I don't even know where our wedding photo album is. Probably lost. Good riddance. I am happier with the photos my partner takes of me today on our camera(s) than the "professionally shot" photos from yesteryear.

"All photographs are there to remind us of what we forget. In this — as in other ways — they are the opposite of paintings. Paintings record what the painter remembers. Because each one of us forgets different things, a photo more than a painting may change its meaning according to who is looking at it." ~John Berger


So you don't care for the methods of the past, but remember they were important stepping stones to the present. I have to say you got what you paid for, and you paid for an amateur. It doesn't mean the rest of us working professionals have to suffer for a lapse in judgement 25 years ago.

QuoteOriginally posted by Christine Tham Quote
I will personally never ever pay for a photographer for any reason whatsoever (including wedding). Don't see why I would need to. Nobody I know would either.
"Photographers deal in things which are continually vanishing and when they have vanished there is no contrivance on earth which can make them come back again." ~Henri Cartier-Bresson

Whether you know it or not, you are already are paying photographers. That pretty photo on a book cover or a promotional movie poster - part of the money spent to create it went to a photographer. The texture on a 3D model - parametric texture generation has its limits, frequently many 3D animators will use a High resolution image for diffuse,bump and specular reflection mapping - that money went to a photographer. The multiple stabbing murder victim, police forensics department frequently use expensive and specialized photographic equipment to make evidence visible that would otherwise have gone unnoticed - And these images have to stand under scrutiny of court, you're average joe couldn't do this with an iPhone - you pay for that too. There will always be a need for paid professional photographers, there are some areas of imaging that are too specialized for amateurs to deliver decent results. photography isn't all about happy snaps, sometimes we get paid to take photos because nobody else can or want to.

QuoteOriginally posted by Christine Tham Quote
Whenever there is a paradigm shift, those that are vested in the old paradigm have the most to lose and therefore the most resistant and the least able to recognise the change.

#WhenIWasYourAge: It took a week to learn whether your photos came out okay. ~Neil deGrasse Tyson, 2014


We aren't seeing a paradigm shift - (personally I think people who use that phrase are hopelessly pretentious) we are seeing the lowering of the bar of entry to an occupation that 50 or so years ago was filled with only a few talented and creative individuals who had the dedication and skills to make a difficult and time consuming hobby a profession and bring photography to the masses. You owe those people respect, not contempt for sticking to their ways.

* Unsurprisingly, there is some debate as to who actually coined this phrase.
**though there would be major bragging rights involved of someone did.

Last edited by Digitalis; 03-30-2015 at 06:09 PM.
03-30-2015, 03:49 AM   #82
Site Supporter
Site Supporter




Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Gladys, Virginia
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 23,662
QuoteOriginally posted by noelpolar Quote
Australia is not that different......I have found that many average people (ie not photographically inclined) seek out cheap photo solutions (ie a friend) for their special occasions....more and more these days.....but when presented with, lets say, more professionally taken shots, they go wow!
That's my experience as well. It is a bride who spent quite a bit of money to have her wedding photographer by a professional who pulls her scrap-booked photos out later to share with friends and not the one whose friend with a Canon T5i snapped a bunch of photos.

On the other hand, people who don't value the skills a professional photographer brings will be more frustrated by the money they wasted on the photographer than able to perceive the benefit given by the skill the photographer brings to the situation.

Particularly for a wedding type situation, it is awfully handy to have gear that allows for capture of images in low light settings and an understanding of how to use strobes -- the sort of thing Uncle Bob isn't likely to be good at.


Last edited by Rondec; 03-30-2015 at 10:17 AM.
03-30-2015, 08:37 AM   #83
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
RGlasel's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Saskatoon
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 2,976
QuoteOriginally posted by Christine Tham Quote
Well, that's an unsubstantiated generalisation.
I was responding to a substantially unsubstantiated post. I don't expect to change your view of professional photography, but I did want to provide a countering viewpoint that is far more prevalent, and easily corroborated. Globally, the middle class is growing, and the middle class is paying other people to record the three categories of life events that I mentioned, regardless of geographical and cultural boundaries.

QuoteOriginally posted by Christine Tham Quote
I just don't believe in paying someone to do something that I (and my friends) would prefer to do ourselves
That was the other generalisation that I responded to. You equated the utility of local transportation for yourself with the utility of having a pre-arranged photographic record of a moment in the life of yourself, produced by a recognized professional, and cited the similar proclivities of your friends, which cannot be substantiated or evaluated in a general context. I pointed out that there is a different utility for self-produced photographs intended for self-consumption than for pre-arranged professional photographs. The utility of pre-arranged professional photographs is not going away, but the value of that utility to individuals varies according to where those individuals are in their life cycle. You cannot equate your determination of the utility of self-produced photographs for private consumption to the overall market for photographic services.

QuoteOriginally posted by Christine Tham Quote
who keeps a running album of her "happiest moments" on Facebook
The point of posting pictures on Facebook is not to curate anything, but to get a reaction to those pictures from our online social circle. We use Facebook as a magic mirror. Anyway, I've wandered far away from the original post, so I will now go back to lurking.
03-30-2015, 12:06 PM   #84
Veteran Member
Christine Tham's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Sydney, Australia
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 2,269
QuoteOriginally posted by RGlasel Quote
I was responding to a substantially unsubstantiated post. I don't expect to change your view of professional photography, but I did want to provide a countering viewpoint that is far more prevalent, and easily corroborated. Globally, the middle class is growing, and the middle class is paying other people to record the three categories of life events that I mentioned, regardless of geographical and cultural boundaries.
Not really. Your countering viewpoint isn't supported by actual evidence. If the "growing" middle class is paying and willing to pay, then we should see an increase in demand for professional photography. We are not.

The overall market for "photographic services" is declining, by actual measures such as the pay rates for photographers as I mentioned, plus a drastic decline in equipment sales. I could cite other measures, such as rate of photography businesses closing.

Some of my friends are professional photographers. They may not be as talented as Rondec's wife, hence they all cite difficult conditions for their work. One of them is a director of the Australian Institute of Photography. As I mentioned earlier, some now find they get more income from things like running workshops than actual photography - that's another evidence for self-service over professional services.

I simply cite my own preferences as a potential data point that support the trend. You can choose to believe it is not a common view if that makes you feel better.

As I mentioned, "those that are vested in the old paradigm ..."

PS: You don't control the reasons why people post to Facebook, or what they choose to post. Just saying'

Last edited by Christine Tham; 03-30-2015 at 12:41 PM.
03-30-2015, 12:47 PM   #85
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
Stavri's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: at a Bean & Leaf
Photos: Albums
Posts: 1,815
QuoteOriginally posted by Christine Tham Quote
Not really. Your countering viewpoint isn't supported by actual evidence. If the "growing" middle class is paying and willing to pay, then we should see an increase in demand for professional photography. We are not.

The overall market for "photographic services" is declining, by actual measures such as the pay rates for photographers as I mentioned, plus a drastic decline in equipment sales. I could cite other measures, such as rate of photography businesses closing.

I simply cite my own preferences as a potential data point that support the trend. You can choose to believe it is not a common view if that makes you feel better.

Some of my friends are professional photographers. They may not be as talented as Rondec's wife, hence they all cite difficult conditions for their work. One of them is a director of the Australian Institute of Photography. As I mentioned earlier, some now find they get more income from things like running workshops than actual photography - that's another evidence for self-service over professional services.

As I mentioned, "those that are vested in the old paradigm ..."

PS: You don't control the reasons why people post to Facebook, or what they choose to post. Just saying'
In a recent interview Ricoh stated they're seeing a lot of demand from the Chinese market for the 645z. Big elaborate weddings from a rising middle class have created a lot of demand for professional photography. The trend of moving to MF seems like an natural evolution of the protog elevating the quality of their product.

Your point of view has been conveyed well. I respect your opinion even though I don't share it. I disagree with the claim that the modern day photographer is a chauffeur in today's society, as an architect the same thing could be said of my profession, or any professional that deals with their clients demands directly.

My clients hire me on the basis of my portfolio of works which reflects my expertise and sensibility. A photographer i assume is contracted for his services in a similar fashion. There might be people who think i'm romanticizing the role of the photographer, from personal experience there's a lot of room for creativity and leeway even in the most trite and constrained compositions.

Talking about the merits of professional photography is a difficult conversation to partake, especially when engaging people of different backgrounds and disciplines. (I hate to generalize) An investment banker might not be as much interested on the ideas conveyed by a painting, photograph of a work of arts, as much as its current and future value. From my experience design aesthetics is a hard sell to most.

I value everyone's input and I urge everyone to espouse their opinions in a civil conversation.

Last edited by Stavri; 03-30-2015 at 12:59 PM.
03-30-2015, 12:48 PM   #86
Veteran Member
Christine Tham's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Sydney, Australia
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 2,269
QuoteOriginally posted by Rondec Quote
That's my experience as well. It is a bride who spent quite a bit of money to have her wedding photographer by a professional who pulls her scrap-booked photos out later to share with friends
Or, perhaps the bride could provide a hashtag and a shared folder for guests to publish and upload their photos, augmented if required via Airtasker (okay, so she is paying, but not via a traditional "pro")

The virtual album could be shared to friends and family, and if required printed on a nicely bound book to hand out.

---------- Post added 03-31-2015 at 07:10 AM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by Stavri Quote
Your point of view has been conveyed well. I respect your opinion even though I don't share it. I disagree with the claim that the modern day photographer is a chauffeur in today's society, as an architect the same thing could be said of my profession, or any professional that deals with their clients demands directly.
Thanks, and thank you for your post, which I enjoyed reading.

I work as a strategy consultant (I don't need to work - I reached the point where I could retire a few years ago, and I actually did, so now I do it for "fun" and because I enjoy it). Any professional needs to understand what value they are delivering and what they have been asked to do.

I like to think that my clients value me for something that they cannot do, or I do things that no one else can. But the reality is - sometimes I am a chauffeur - I am driving my clients to a destination in their own car. Could they have driven it themselves? Quite probably. But maybe they don't have enough time. Or I have knowledge of the road conditions that they don't. Or maybe I am just a more careful driver. Or maybe all I am doing is providing them with a pair of hands so that they can focus on something else (like, maybe, actually running their business).

It is the same with photography. My point with the chauffeur and public transportation example is that it is relevant. Hiring a photographer is like hiring a chauffeur or a taxi driver. Driving your own car is owning and using your own camera. And taking public transportation is crowdsourcing. The paradigm shift in the photography industry is the changing dynamics of all this.

I don't think photographers will disappear entirely (and I hope not, for the sake of my friends). But the landscape is shifting.
03-30-2015, 04:22 PM   #87
Site Supporter
Site Supporter




Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Gladys, Virginia
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 23,662
QuoteOriginally posted by Christine Tham Quote
Or, perhaps the bride could provide a hashtag and a shared folder for guests to publish and upload their photos, augmented if required via Airtasker (okay, so she is paying, but not via a traditional "pro")

The virtual album could be shared to friends and family, and if required printed on a nicely bound book to hand out.

---------- Post added 03-31-2015 at 07:10 AM ----------



Thanks, and thank you for your post, which I enjoyed reading.

I work as a strategy consultant (I don't need to work - I reached the point where I could retire a few years ago, and I actually did, so now I do it for "fun" and because I enjoy it). Any professional needs to understand what value they are delivering and what they have been asked to do.

I like to think that my clients value me for something that they cannot do, or I do things that no one else can. But the reality is - sometimes I am a chauffeur - I am driving my clients to a destination in their own car. Could they have driven it themselves? Quite probably. But maybe they don't have enough time. Or I have knowledge of the road conditions that they don't. Or maybe I am just a more careful driver. Or maybe all I am doing is providing them with a pair of hands so that they can focus on something else (like, maybe, actually running their business).

It is the same with photography. My point with the chauffeur and public transportation example is that it is relevant. Hiring a photographer is like hiring a chauffeur or a taxi driver. Driving your own car is owning and using your own camera. And taking public transportation is crowdsourcing. The paradigm shift in the photography industry is the changing dynamics of all this.

I don't think photographers will disappear entirely (and I hope not, for the sake of my friends). But the landscape is shifting.
This discussion has gone fairly far afield from the initial point of the OP. I would say that the issue with photography as a profession is that it has been heavily diluted. There is nothing to stop anyone who owns an SLR, kit lens and a 50mm f1.8 from deciding that they are a professional and can shoot weddings for 200 dollars, or whatever low ball price they choose to set.

As to your crowd sourcing idea for wedding photography, with everyone posting their photos at a common location, I know exactly what the results would be and I would far prefer to have my kid's weddings shot by a photographer who I have chosen by looking at his/her portfolio and is going to get an artistic mixture of candid and formal shots.

I like shooting photos of my kids and I have nice lenses and cameras, but I can clearly see the difference between what I do and what my wife does when she chooses to do a formal shoot with them (or someone else). That difference is worth quite a bit, in my opinion.
03-30-2015, 06:48 PM   #88
Veteran Member
Christine Tham's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Sydney, Australia
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 2,269
QuoteOriginally posted by Rondec Quote
As to your crowd sourcing idea for wedding photography, with everyone posting their photos at a common location, I know exactly what the results would be and I would far prefer to have my kid's weddings shot by a photographer who I have chosen by looking at his/her portfolio and is going to get an artistic mixture of candid and formal shots.
It's not an idea, it's fairly common. Perhaps others are not constrained by your prejudices about what you think the results would be. As for your preferences, maybe you should let your kids decide for themselves when and if they get married? After all, it is their wedding.

As to the starting price for someone with a camera taking photos, it's $0.

A few years ago, I shot some photos at a sculpture gallery (with the permission of the owners). I sent them the results, hoping they would enjoy them. They immediately contacted me, invited me to lunch, and wanted to commission me to do a formal shoot for their web site. They also wanted to get me to be the photographer for a book they were planning showcasing their sculptures with various celebrities.

The price I quoted them was: $0. I have already earned millions from consulting since my "retirement" - there is no need for me to turn an interest/hobby into a profession. There is no price I could set that would be commensurate with the intrinsic value (whatever that may be) of my work, vs the money I could earn from my day job. So I said to them, you are free to use my photos for your web site, and I am happy to take more photos. But I do it on my terms, and I reserve the right to take whatever photos I want.

Last edited by Christine Tham; 03-30-2015 at 07:12 PM.
03-31-2015, 02:09 AM   #89
Veteran Member
Clavius's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: De Klundert
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 4,118
QuoteOriginally posted by Christine Tham Quote
It's not an idea, it's fairly common. Perhaps others are not constrained by your prejudices about what you think the results would be.
It is common and a long-time practice too. At my wedding (which took place on the transition between film and digital) we bought 30 little throw-away film cameras and handed them out to the guests. It's the film equivalent of using an open album for guests to post their pics to. I must add, in addition I did hand my own digital gear to my friend also.
03-31-2015, 03:10 AM   #90
Site Supporter
Site Supporter




Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Gladys, Virginia
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 23,662
QuoteOriginally posted by Christine Tham Quote
It's not an idea, it's fairly common. Perhaps others are not constrained by your prejudices about what you think the results would be. As for your preferences, maybe you should let your kids decide for themselves when and if they get married? After all, it is their wedding.

As to the starting price for someone with a camera taking photos, it's $0.

A few years ago, I shot some photos at a sculpture gallery (with the permission of the owners). I sent them the results, hoping they would enjoy them. They immediately contacted me, invited me to lunch, and wanted to commission me to do a formal shoot for their web site. They also wanted to get me to be the photographer for a book they were planning showcasing their sculptures with various celebrities.

The price I quoted them was: $0. I have already earned millions from consulting since my "retirement" - there is no need for me to turn an interest/hobby into a profession. There is no price I could set that would be commensurate with the intrinsic value (whatever that may be) of my work, vs the money I could earn from my day job. So I said to them, you are free to use my photos for your web site, and I am happy to take more photos. But I do it on my terms, and I reserve the right to take whatever photos I want.
My kids are far from this point (the oldest is 8). However, I will repeat that I do see the value in having professionals -- videographer and photographer -- present for the day.

I'm glad as well, that you have made millions, although I am not sure what that has to do with the discussion at hand.
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
5ds dslr 50mp, album, bride, camera, cameras, canon, canon eos 5ds, car, clients, driver, dslr, dslr 50mp with/without, eos, eos 5ds dslr, equivalent, film, friends, guests, individuals, people, photographer, photographers, photography, photos, post, transportation
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Canon announces EOS-1D C 4K DSLR jogiba Non-Pentax Cameras: Canon, Nikon, etc. 26 04-22-2012 11:47 AM
Asahi Pentax Spotmatic SLR lens adapter for Canon DSLR EOS? emmatrim Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 6 03-28-2010 12:43 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 12:56 AM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top