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12-04-2021, 03:28 PM   #16
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Not sure what initiated it, but the world has turned a nostalgic corner and many are bringing back some of the older processes and products.

12-15-2021, 11:21 PM   #17
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Just my $0.02....

I love Kodak Tri-X. I love it for its slightly darker contrast over Illford HP5. Unfortunately, Kodak Tri-X has become very expensive, and HP5 is starting to become a new go-to film for me. Nothing wrong with HP5...I just like Kodak better...but I'm liking it less the more its price goes up. Illford FP4 is an absolutely wonderful lower speed B&W film. For "around" the 100 ASA speed mark, I think its the best all purpose B&W film you can get. Of course, with FP4...be careful of low light situations...

For color.. the consumer grade Kodak Gold 200, and Ultramax 400 are strong performers. I've used Ektar 100.. it's great but expensive; Portra is wonderful, but the same caveat. They are "nicer" than the consumer grade films, but at a cost.

If your getting back in the swing of things, IMHO, try Illford HP5 for B&W, and Kodak Ultramax 400 for color. I don't think you'll be disappointed with those two film stocks as a jumping off point.

Last edited by sconut1; 12-15-2021 at 11:24 PM. Reason: Spelling
12-15-2021, 11:26 PM   #18
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Lomography color film is well regarded, I have some Lomo 100 that I haven't shot yet... Their 800 speed film is a favorite of some folks.
12-20-2021, 01:10 AM   #19
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QuoteOriginally posted by stephen_G Quote
Hi All,

I'm looking for some guidance from film users on the forum.
I plan to do some film photography after a long time off from film.
(I'm having my old film camera serviced as I write).
I've lost touch with what films are available nowadays, does anyone have any recommendations please for film for landscape and wildlife photography?
Also when I have the film processed, what do I need to ask for from the processors in terms of files/formats that I can upload to the forum.
And if anyone can recommend a good film processor, that would be great.

Thanks

Stephen
For film, check out Analogue Wonderland if you're in the UK. They have recently opened a lab too, the Analogue Wonderlab but I haven't used it yet. I've used The Darkroom UK: post films one day, download the scans the next. Negs arrive a day or two after that.

K.

12-20-2021, 08:50 AM - 1 Like   #20
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I highly recommend shooting black and white and processing it yourself at home. Its basically easy to do now with apps like Massive Dev Chart. You get this instant feedback, and if you buy a camera its super cheap to shoot a test roll. I recommend Ilford FP4 or HP5 at box speed with D76 or XTOL chemicals. Other highly recommended stocks are Fuji Acros II, Portra 400 if you want to do color, and I love Kodak Gold and Fuji C200 drugstore film. Unfortunately the costs of drugstore film have skyrocketed so now its not such a good deal as its pretty much as expensive or more expensive than the previous films mentioned.
12-20-2021, 02:34 PM   #21
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QuoteOriginally posted by y0chang Quote
I highly recommend shooting black and white and processing it yourself at home. Its basically easy to do now with apps like Massive Dev Chart. You get this instant feedback, and if you buy a camera its super cheap to shoot a test roll. I recommend Ilford FP4 or HP5 at box speed with D76 or XTOL chemicals. Other highly recommended stocks are Fuji Acros II, Portra 400 if you want to do color, and I love Kodak Gold and Fuji C200 drugstore film. Unfortunately the costs of drugstore film have skyrocketed so now its not such a good deal as its pretty much as expensive or more expensive than the previous films mentioned.
FP4 is a lot more expensive than I'd like it to be, I recommend maybe Fomapan 200 as a cheaper alternative. HP5 is worth it just because it's so flexible and pretty much catches a scene no matter how challenging it is. Acros and Portra are also really expensive! Worth it maybe, but a pain to pay for.
12-20-2021, 08:50 PM - 2 Likes   #22
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If you're coming from digi back to film, one thing to keep in mind is that most all color negatives and b&w film have near endless overexposure latitude specially compared to digi - even RAW.
As you can see from these results, Kodak Portra 400 can be overexposed by 10 stops and still recoverable with simple post work of white balance and levels while RAW digi cannot even achieve +3.



I didn't expect Kodak Ektar 100 to go as far since it is a more contrasty film but I was wrong.

Knowing this, I came upon this scene that my camera suggested a 1/60 shutter speed but I figure I needed 2 seconds in order to achieve a smoother water flow. Knowing the Fuji 100 can handle this much overexposure, I shot it at 2 seconds confident I can use the results with no problems. Normal processing at box speed.



Although the film may have captured a very wide latitude scene, you may need to apply some post work to bring out the detail. For instance in this scene using Kodak Ektar 100, I had to use the Shadows tool to bring out the details hidden in the shadows due to a noon sun.



12-21-2021, 08:18 AM - 1 Like   #23
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QuoteOriginally posted by LesDMess Quote
If you're coming from digi back to film, one thing to keep in mind is that most all color negatives and b&w film have near endless overexposure latitude specially compared to digi - even RAW.
As you can see from these results, Kodak Portra 400 can be overexposed by 10 stops and still recoverable with simple post work of white balance and levels while RAW digi cannot even achieve +3.



I didn't expect Kodak Ektar 100 to go as far since it is a more contrasty film but I was wrong.

Knowing this, I came upon this scene that my camera suggested a 1/60 shutter speed but I figure I needed 2 seconds in order to achieve a smoother water flow. Knowing the Fuji 100 can handle this much overexposure, I shot it at 2 seconds confident I can use the results with no problems. Normal processing at box speed.



Although the film may have captured a very wide latitude scene, you may need to apply some post work to bring out the detail. For instance in this scene using Kodak Ektar 100, I had to use the Shadows tool to bring out the details hidden in the shadows due to a noon sun.

Wow, that is quite impressive. I think I recall that film had significant latitude in processing, but I did not realize it was so much. Thank you for sharing this information.
12-21-2021, 01:50 PM   #24
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QuoteOriginally posted by Photos-by-Chas Quote
Wow, that is quite impressive. I think I recall that film had significant latitude in processing, but I did not realize it was so much. Thank you for sharing this information.
You're welcome.

Here is the full latitude test I conducted with Portra 400. In my workflow and depending on the subject matter, I am confident I can work with -2 to +8 with confidence.



This one for Kodak Tri-X processed using XTOL



I have shot many others this way just so I would know for myself. Knowing film's latitude - err on the side of overexposure, I can confidently use color or b&w with my meterless cameras during daylight without needing even a meter ap.
12-21-2021, 02:53 PM   #25
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Thanks for this information.
This agrees with my long standing thought of "In digital you protect the highlights and in film you protect the shadows"

Thanks,
Ismael
12-21-2021, 04:14 PM   #26
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QuoteOriginally posted by ismaelg Quote
Thanks for this information.
This agrees with my long standing thought of "In digital you protect the highlights and in film you protect the shadows"

Thanks,
Ismael
I recall that digi saying of shooting to the right - or was it left, of the histogram to make sure you don't blow out the highlights.

Portra 400's single frame latitude covering deep shadows to bright highligts is just outstanding . . .



Sure, the film has absorbed the full spectrum but in the scanning/digitization process, you will need to apply some post work to realize those areas.

Also, if you're into it, take advantage of film's still outstanding advantage of extremely long exposure. In this case about 45 minutes on Kodak Ektar 100 of the Hoover Dam and bypass taken using the Pentax LX's aperture priority mode that literally has no time limits . . .



Of course if not the LX you simply put your camera in bulb mode to expose for these ultra long durations.
12-21-2021, 04:34 PM   #27
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QuoteOriginally posted by LesDMess Quote
I recall that digi saying of shooting to the right - or was it left, of the histogram to make sure you don't blow out the highlights.

Portra 400's single frame latitude covering deep shadows to bright highligts is just outstanding . . .



Sure, the film has absorbed the full spectrum but in the scanning/digitization process, you will need to apply some post work to realize those areas.

Also, if you're into it, take advantage of film's still outstanding advantage of extremely long exposure. In this case about 45 minutes on Kodak Ektar 100 of the Hoover Dam and bypass taken using the Pentax LX's aperture priority mode that literally has no time limits . . .



Of course if not the LX you simply put your camera in bulb mode to expose for these ultra long durations.
When you get this huge range of latitude, you aren't doing this with a commercial lab scan, though, are you?

I get some extra latitude, but I never seem to get anything like this... maybe I'm doing something else wrong (which has been known to happen...)

And I'll freely admit I am nothing but thumbs when it comes to sophisticated post-processing...

-Eric
12-21-2021, 07:11 PM   #28
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QuoteOriginally posted by TwoUptons Quote
When you get this huge range of latitude, you aren't doing this with a commercial lab scan, though, are you?

I get some extra latitude, but I never seem to get anything like this... maybe I'm doing something else wrong (which has been known to happen...)

And I'll freely admit I am nothing but thumbs when it comes to sophisticated post-processing...

-Eric
I have been using image manipulation tools since the 80's but these days I only ever use ACDSee - unless I need layers, as it pretty much has all the tools needed like LightEqualization to achieve shadow and highlight details.

Also do a lot of stitching many frames together using Microsoft ICE.

This one of 4 frames of Kodak Ektar 100 . . .

12-21-2021, 08:01 PM   #29
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You are more limited in scanning technology dynamic range than in the film dynamic range, although there are ways around that as well like scanning with multiple exposures or using a modern digital to do the scans.
12-21-2021, 08:42 PM - 1 Like   #30
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This information could be a good start on revitalizing the film industry, and raise interest in the old more manual film SLRs. Of course a decrease in some of the costs for film and processing would also be a big help.
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