Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
05-15-2010, 03:35 PM   #1
Inactive Account




Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Down south
Posts: 7
Black & White

Hello All, Could anyone name a good quality B&W film that is not to expensive? I have never shot B&W and would like to try. Also any idea what I would need to develop my pictures. Please remember that I am a newbie And could you break down the expense of the items. I know its asking alot but I figure the answer would be here Thanks

05-15-2010, 06:33 PM   #2
Pentaxian
Ratmagiclady's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: GA
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 13,464
Not a problem. Pardon the brief answer, but we can elaborate.

Have a look at freestylephoto.biz. Arista Premium is reputedly the same as Tri-X, (I'm in the process of testing that theory, myself. Doesn't taste the same, though.) And there's plenty of student films.

Also, I believe there's some resources for starting to do your own processing. Doing your own negs really doesn't take terribly much.
05-15-2010, 06:34 PM   #3
Inactive Account




Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Michigan, USA
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 7,485
QuoteOriginally posted by toten44 Quote
Hello All, Could anyone name a good quality B&W film that is not to expensive? I have never shot B&W and would like to try. Also any idea what I would need to develop my pictures. Please remember that I am a newbie And could you break down the expense of the items. I know its asking alot but I figure the answer would be here Thanks
For Film you can start with Kodak 400CN, which is a Black and White film that can be processed with C41 (same as color prints) checmicals at a local lab (or wallmart type place).

For Real black and white, I've grown to like Ilford PanF+ 50. There are many on the market though and you can get them through places like B&H, or Freestyle. The bigger problem is going to be the chemicals. Several places have gone to not shipping (it seems) liquid chemicals so check before you buy.

To Start, I would go with a D-76 or HC110 from Kodak. The D76 is a powder and you can get it to mix either a 1 liter or 5 liter batch. You can use it straight or cut it 1:1.. The HC110 is a liquid concentrate that you can mix on a per use basis and mix only what you need.

Then you will need a stop bath. Kodaks indicator stop is perfectly fine and lasts nearly forever (can be reused).

The fixer is the 3rd step in the chemical process. I use Kodak's fixer (or have been for several years). This too can be reused and mixed in smaller batches.

Both the stopper and the fixer are the same chemicals you would be using if you decided to do your own wet prints.

The final parts are Hypo Clear and Photoflo. The Hypo clear helps to greatly reduce washing times after you've done the fixer step. The photoflo is basically a wetting agent that helps the film dry evenly (that's the best description I can come up with at the minute).

The equipment is simple for processing film. You'll need a canister with the proper reels to spool the film. I would suggest the Patterson plastic types. You will need a changing bag or a dark (100% dark) room to spool the film on to the reel.

From there, a thermometer to check the temp of the chems (so you can adjust working times), some clips (one weighted) to hang the film for drying, and a kitchen or utility room sink to do the work. Naturally you'll need some bottles to mix and store the chemicals. Rubber gloves to keep the checmicals off of your skin.

Those are the absolute basics. I would check Craigslist in your area for people looking to dump darkroom equipment. I would also seek out a book, many have been printed over the years, that explains step by step what to do. Or one of the multitude of online resources..

Google

Good luck..

05-15-2010, 06:36 PM   #4
Inactive Account




Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Michigan, USA
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 7,485
QuoteOriginally posted by Ratmagiclady Quote
Not a problem. Pardon the brief answer, but we can elaborate.

Have a look at freestylephoto.biz. Arista Premium is reputedly the same as Tri-X, (I'm in the process of testing that theory, myself. Doesn't taste the same, though.) And there's plenty of student films.

Also, I believe there's some resources for starting to do your own processing. Doing your own negs really doesn't take terribly much.
But does it Smell the same?



05-15-2010, 06:38 PM   #5
Site Supporter
Sluggo's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Ames, Iowa
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 541
I'll echo the recommendation to look at Freestyle. I particularly like the inexpensive "arista.edu" films.
05-15-2010, 10:38 PM   #6
Pentaxian
titrisol's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: In the most populated state... state of denial
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 1,094
FOMA film from the Chzeck Republic is quite inexpensive and a very capable film.
I think the Arista.edu flavor is from this origin
05-16-2010, 05:52 PM   #7
Forum Member




Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: New York
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 66
QuoteQuote:
To Start, I would go with a D-76 or HC110 from Kodak. The D76 is a powder and you can get it to mix either a 1 liter or 5 liter batch. You can use it straight or cut it 1:1.. The HC110 is a liquid concentrate that you can mix on a per use basis and mix only what you need.
In which case some cheap syringes are in order. HC-110 is a high concentrate developer so you'll only need a few milliliters per roll of film.With a syringe, you can actually measure it accurately.

QuoteQuote:
Then you will need a stop bath. Kodaks indicator stop is perfectly fine and lasts nearly forever (can be reused).
Stop bath isn't really necessary. Plain water will do. Another option is distilled vinegar with water (parts 1+5 for example). It should theoretically stop the development a little faster than just water.

QuoteQuote:
The final parts are Hypo Clear and Photoflo. The Hypo clear helps to greatly reduce washing times after you've done the fixer step. The photoflo is basically a wetting agent that helps the film dry evenly (that's the best description I can come up with at the minute).
Hypo clear is also dispensable. I've never used it. The whole washing step step takes maybe a minute and is not the most time-consuming part. Photoflo however I would not want to do without indeed.

I've found that the best way to get the water off the film is not a film squeegee (they introduce really ugly scratches and blemishes) but just your fingers. Run the wet film twice or so through between your index and middle finger and then hang them it up to dry. 15 minutes should suffice. This is safe even with the most delicate of films, such as Efke or so.

Cheers,
Tassilo
05-16-2010, 10:49 PM   #8
Site Supporter
stevebrot's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Vancouver (USA)
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 26,190
1+ for the Freestyle suggestion. They have several lines of B&W films with prices under $3.00 USD per roll.


Steve

05-17-2010, 06:11 AM   #9
Veteran Member
Nesster's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: NJ USA
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 13,047
Another easy way to get into developing is Ilford - their web site has a lot of good, easy to understand info, and they sell several varieties of liquid developer that's easy to mix into a working solution. Or try Kodak Tmax developer - it's quite good and also easy to use.

Freestyle is the best source for B&W stuff, cheaper than B&H for film at least.

You'll need to pay for the initial set up, as detailed above, of chemistry (you really only need 3 or 4 items for a basic kit: developer, stop, fixer, and photo-flo) and a cheap plastic tank - these come with plastic reels that are easier to load than metal ones, and you agitate using a stir-stick rather than inversion. They work well.

Other misc items that get you through: a graduate or measuring cup that's accurate enough to mix working developer in (though, ultimate accuracy results in repeatability; the process is tolerant of quite a bit of slop however), a thermometer, a bottle opener for the film canister, a pair of scissors to cut the leader off the film, a couple of clothespins (and a good place to hang the film, a bathroom shower/tub stall is usually the best)... and either a room you can make very dark (closet, bathroom) or a changing bag.

But as mentioned above, if you want to get your feet wet, Kodak BW400CN or Ilford XP2 are developed by your local minilab, and scanned too by them, though usually you need to desaturate the results.

In real B&W film, I don't like Kodak due to the curling I experience with it. Ilford is a bit better - and apart from Foma (100 is better than the 400), I can recommend Fuji's two films as excellent and cheaper than either Kodak or Ilford.
05-17-2010, 08:22 AM   #10
Site Supporter
ChrisPlatt's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Queens NYC
Posts: 4,433
Conventional 35mm black and white negative film is easy to develop at home. A darkroom is not required.
The equipment and chemicals required to get started will cost about $50-75.

What to do with your developed negatives is more complicated and/or expensive.
A scanner is required to get your images onto your computer,
or an enlarger and darkroom to make conventional wet prints.

Or you might consider using chromogenic black and white film like Kodak BW400CN or Ilford XP2.
These can be developed, scanned and/or printed at your local drugstore just like color negative film.

Chris

Last edited by ChrisPlatt; 05-17-2010 at 11:05 AM.
05-17-2010, 02:24 PM   #11
Inactive Account




Join Date: May 2007
Location: Indianapolis, Indiana
Posts: 652
+3 for freestyle. Legacy pro 100 and 400 are relabeled Fuji Acros and Neopan 400 respectively; both for under $2.00. HC-110 is nice because it is very economical(dilution H) and lasts a very long time without going bad(practically forever).

I just started developing B&W less than a year ago and it is very very easy, but can be hard to master(I haven't). If you leave the rolls uncut, I'd bet almost any mini-lab could scan it for you relatively cheaply.

Last edited by Vertex Ninja; 05-17-2010 at 05:28 PM.
05-17-2010, 02:25 PM   #12
Inactive Account




Join Date: May 2007
Location: Indianapolis, Indiana
Posts: 652
QuoteOriginally posted by vparseval Quote
In which case some cheap syringes are in order.
Better yet, free! just ask your local pharmacy for syringes to give medicine to babies. They'll likely hand them to you at no charge.
05-17-2010, 08:34 PM   #13
WJW
Veteran Member




Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Central Texas
Posts: 378
Another developer that lasts forever is Rodinal, but it works better with slower (finer-grained) films because it will make the grain more noticeable.

See Rodinal - Oldest Commercial Developer
05-18-2010, 11:42 AM   #14
Pentaxian




Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Seattle
Posts: 6,929
QuoteOriginally posted by WJW Quote
Another developer that lasts forever is Rodinal, but it works better with slower (finer-grained) films because it will make the grain more noticeable.

See Rodinal - Oldest Commercial Developer
It seems all users of Rodinal know it lasts a long time but I wonder why the manufacture still says 6 months once opened in their instructions. It's a scam, I say, to sell more of it!
05-24-2010, 08:18 AM   #15
New Member
AndyJohnson's Avatar

Join Date: May 2010
Location: uk
Posts: 6
Lol its scum ,am seem to disagree with you on that,anyway thats just my opinion
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Black & White Spooky Black & White VaughnA Photo Critique 7 01-15-2010 03:01 PM
Landscape The Black & White Of It IowaBoy Post Your Photos! 5 12-05-2009 09:48 AM
Ruins in Black & White wa5am Post Your Photos! 19 11-15-2008 11:36 PM
shooting in black&white AmandaJL Pentax DSLR Discussion 5 01-25-2008 11:48 AM
Black & white sunrise ? simonkit Post Your Photos! 14 12-23-2007 04:11 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 06:19 AM. | See also: NikonForums.com, part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top