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06-07-2010, 05:15 PM   #16
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QuoteOriginally posted by EyeSpy Quote
Lowell, I don't understand how frame distortion causes electrical failure.
What causes frame distortion? Nor do I undertstand the tripod thing. Is the connection: camera to tripod or lens to tripod? I have an XR-2 that I haven't used much, so very curious. I will be on the road for several days so don't be offended if I should not reply to your reply. Thank you.
this was a common test of all photo magazines in the 1980's

they would hang a big zoom lens with no tripod mount on the lens, and mount the entire thing by the camera's tripod mount. Use, as a working example my 950gram (2 pound) Vivitar 70-210 F3.5 Series 1 version 1.

The battery goes into the bottom plastic plate of the camera where a lot of the electrics is stored, but there is an internal aluminum frame. between the plastic and aluminium is a spring contact or two. When you hang the 2 pound lens cantalevered out off the body the stress distorts the frame and separates the contacts between bottom assembly and frame.

I spent forever trying to get mine sorted out, and it still to this day occasionally just refuses to work because of the intermittant contacts. None of these are gold plated or anything, and I have jumpered most of them out.

I use the XR2-s very infrequently these days as I have a PZ-1, KX and 3 DSLR bodies also. I need to actually shoot some film so I can prove to myself I can take a shot and wait 2 days to see it

06-07-2010, 08:34 PM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by ChrisPlatt Quote
In a nuclear war you can keep shooting even after they drop the big one.
The electromagnetic pulse will render other's electronic cameras useless.

Chris
Just remember to keep your film stored in a lead lined bag or container.
06-08-2010, 04:20 AM   #18
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Some mechanical cameras (Chinon CS for example) even feature metal shutters and require little maintenance.
IN teh Spotties a good CLA every 10 years is enough to keep them ticking.

Another advantage is the beautiful sound they make...
06-08-2010, 11:23 PM   #19
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QuoteOriginally posted by EyeSpy Quote
Lowell, I don't understand how frame distortion causes electrical failure.
What causes frame distortion? Nor do I undertstand the tripod thing. Is the connection: camera to tripod or lens to tripod? I have an XR-2 that I haven't used much, so very curious. I will be on the road for several days so don't be offended if I should not reply to your reply. Thank you.
The weight of the giant lens pulling the camera's frame (chassis) out of shape - pulling the contacts off the battery.

06-23-2010, 06:32 AM   #20
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Lowell and Lithos. Thank you very much. I learn something about this science everyday.
06-23-2010, 12:03 PM   #21
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QuoteOriginally posted by Blue Quote
Note that there is no hyphen in the name he used and both the K and X are upper case. That is the official name of the 1970 vintage k-mount film camera. The second point is this is the film camera forum. The digital SLR is the K-x

KX

Edit: The same goes for the KM (1970s film body) and K-m (K2000) recent dSLR.
When I first started paying attention to this part of the forum, that confused me as well.

As to the benefits, I can only say that my second MX, which was refurbished this year by Eric, has a working meter for the first time in almost 20 years. It made a number of trips with me and performed admirably with no battery.

Last edited by GeneV; 06-23-2010 at 12:10 PM.
07-01-2010, 12:27 AM   #22
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A perfect example of what a camera that has mechanical capabilities can do. Many years ago (late 80's), I was at an NHRA event with a ME-Super (that I still have). It was a very cool 40 degrees, and the batteries were already a bit weak.

I saw the typical flashing led in the viewfinder so I got a reading off the palm of my hand, opened up a stop, set the camera on x-sync and merrily continued to shoot. Pictures saved and the only thing to suffer was me!
07-01-2010, 05:41 AM   #23
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I guess you mean 40F, which translates to about 4C? That really isn't all that cold. I'm surprised the batteries would go even at that temperature?

And oh...how do you take a reading off the palm of the hand? Sorry if this is a noob question.

07-01-2010, 04:47 PM   #24
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40*F is cold if you live in Tx, when April weather is generally around 70 to 80. The batteries were on their last leg when I went to the event, I just didn't think about getting new ones.

Maybe Kodak can explain it better than I can...

What if you can't walk up to your subject to take a meter reading? For instance, suppose that you're trying to photograph a deer in sunlight at the edge of a wood. If the background is dark, a meter reading of the overall scene will give you an incorrect exposure for the deer. Obviously, if you try to take a close-up reading of the deer, you're going to lose your subject before you ever get the picture. One answer is to make a substitute reading off the palm of your hand, providing that your hand is illuminated by the same light as your subject, then use a lens opening 1 stop larger than the meter indicates. For example, if the reading off your hand is f/16, open up one stop to f/11 to get the correct exposure. The exposure increase is necessary because the meter overreacts to the brightness of your palm which is about twice as bright as an average subject. When you take the reading, be sure that the lighting on your palm is the same as on the subject. Don't shade your palm.
07-02-2010, 11:20 AM   #25
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QuoteOriginally posted by Lindel Quote
40*F is cold if you live in Tx, when April weather is generally around 70 to 80. The batteries were on their last leg when I went to the event, I just didn't think about getting new ones.

Maybe Kodak can explain it better than I can...

What if you can't walk up to your subject to take a meter reading? For instance, suppose that you're trying to photograph a deer in sunlight at the edge of a wood. If the background is dark, a meter reading of the overall scene will give you an incorrect exposure for the deer. Obviously, if you try to take a close-up reading of the deer, you're going to lose your subject before you ever get the picture...
Solid advice, Lindel. I do that sort of thing all the time.

On the subject of cold weather photography, I wouldn't make generalizations about the behaviour of any older camera, mechanical or electronic, in the cold. A lot depends on the state of the lubricants, which varies depending on the quality of the original lubricants, the history of the camera (for example, has it spent a lot of time in hot cars?), and the quality of servicing the camera has received. (I lived and worked north of 60 for 30 years. Shot at temperatures below -40 many times.)

Regarding mechanical vs. electronic bodies: As a sem-retired professional I sometimes use mechanical 35mm bodies. I do this for the user experience- the pleasure of using a well-crafted instrument, and simple nostalgia, rather than for any practical reasons. It's just plain fun!

Battery life in my view is a non-issue. You should carry spares in your camera bag whether you're using a mechanical or electronic body, as a dead meter is a real nuisance- period.

For me a more versatile setup is a body with full manual exposure capabilities as well as at least aperture priority auto.

Cheers

John Poirier
07-05-2010, 04:59 AM   #26
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The symphany that is a mechanical shutter, is the best reason to shoot with vintage equipment.
07-05-2010, 07:40 AM   #27
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It's a bit ironic that so many love the sound of the mirror and focal plane shutter, especially on some of the noisier models,
as this has always been one of the major criticisms of the SLR design, and something the manufacturers strove to minimize.

Chris
07-05-2010, 10:24 AM   #28
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QuoteOriginally posted by ChrisPlatt Quote
It's a bit ironic that so many love the sound of the mirror and focal plane shutter, especially on some of the noisier models,
as this has always been one of the major criticisms of the SLR design, and something the manufacturers strove to minimize.

Chris
ShaaaaKlumph!!!

While I like the sound on a couple of my cameras, for the most part, I wish it were quieter!


Steve
07-10-2010, 02:27 PM   #29
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Don't forget the LX is another mechanical beauty that can run battery free, Shutter speeds (mechanical)
1/75 - 1/2000s, you will need a seperate meter, but Weston V's are battery free too.
07-12-2010, 11:37 AM   #30
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QuoteOriginally posted by ChrisPlatt Quote
In a nuclear war you can keep shooting even after they drop the big one.
The electromagnetic pulse will render other's electronic cameras useless.

Chris
You just have to find a leaden box to carry the films in
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