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07-12-2010, 01:35 PM   #31
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Not an operational issue, but still a factor, is the small size of the mechanical bodies. With no large batteries (or the seemingly inevitable flash bump and AF functions that goes with them) the bodies are much less bulky. Put an MX next to a *istDS or K20D.

Then again, the difference in the bulk of the 'film' is also a factor in what you're carrying with you.

H2

07-12-2010, 02:00 PM   #32
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QuoteOriginally posted by pacerr Quote
...Then again, the difference in the bulk of the 'film' is also a factor in what you're carrying with you.
So true! My 4x5 field camera weighs less than five pounds as a two lens kit. Things get quite a bit heavier and bulkier when you add in half a dozen film holders (12 exposures).


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07-12-2010, 03:37 PM   #33
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QuoteOriginally posted by stevebrot Quote
So true! My 4x5 field camera weighs less than five pounds as a two lens kit. Things get quite a bit heavier and bulkier when you add in half a dozen film holders (12 exposures).


Steve
Yep. And when I finally decided to pay extra for film in order to carry more of it with Fuji's quick loader, they discontinued their BW quick load film just a few months after I purchased it. I really liked that method.
07-12-2010, 03:38 PM   #34
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QuoteOriginally posted by tuco Quote
Yep. And when I finally decided to pay extra for film in order to carry more of it with Fuji's quick loader, they discontinued their BW quick load film just a few months after I purchased it. I really liked that method.
There is always the Grafmatic


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07-13-2010, 09:51 AM   #35
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Regarding the benefits of shooting with a mechanical therefore film camera don't overlook the dissatisfaction factor. With digital I can take several photos and be unhappy with them right away. With my film camera I can take several photos, drop my slide film off for processing, and be happy with my shots for one to two weeks until I see them.
07-13-2010, 10:20 AM   #36
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A good mechanical Camera any time. A good hand-held Meter and you are done. I don't trust built-in camera meters.
07-13-2010, 12:50 PM   #37
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QuoteOriginally posted by Bruiser Quote
A good mechanical Camera any time. A good hand-held Meter and you are done. I don't trust built-in camera meters.
Is there a particular reason why? I always thought that TTL metering would be the best way to do it. The best external meter is still only guessing at what exact area appears in-frame in an SLR, and what the lens is doing to that light.
07-13-2010, 01:48 PM   #38
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QuoteOriginally posted by unixrevolution Quote
Is there a particular reason why? I always thought that TTL metering would be the best way to do it. The best external meter is still only guessing at what exact area appears in-frame in an SLR, and what the lens is doing to that light.
I'd say that is ignoring what a one-degree spot meter can do. Aim your camera's meter directly at the Sun while including foreground objects and in one shot capture shadow detail. Not impossible, I'm sure, scene and meter sophistication dependent, but knowing if you got it will most likely have to wait until you see the results unless you're really tuned into your camera's meter for extremes. With the one-degree spot meter, you know in advance of taking the picture where you're placing that shadow detail.

07-13-2010, 03:24 PM   #39
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Except in rare and extreme cases IMO you are usually better off using the camera's built-in light meter.
This assumes you are thoroughly familiar with it, and know how to compensate in situations when it might be "fooled".

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07-13-2010, 03:39 PM   #40
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QuoteOriginally posted by ChrisPlatt Quote
Except in rare and extreme cases IMO you are usually better off using the camera's built-in light meter.
This assumes you are thoroughly familiar with it, and know how to compensate in situations when it might be "fooled".

Chris
Well, sure, it is way more convenient than hauling a one-degree around that's for sure. And much faster too. Lots of advantages to a built in meter. But even on not too extreme conditions a one-degree does tell you something else. Next time you shoot a 15+ stop scene (easy on a bright day), look at the scene after taking the shot and identify what parts in the scene went accent black and/or accent white. If you like knowing that in advance of taking the picture, it helps to have a one-degree.

Similarly on a gloomy, 5 stop day. You want that white wall to be white? Easy.

Last edited by tuco; 07-13-2010 at 03:59 PM.
07-13-2010, 04:42 PM   #41
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QuoteOriginally posted by B Grace Quote
Regarding the benefits of shooting with a mechanical therefore film camera don't overlook the dissatisfaction factor. With digital I can take several photos and be unhappy with them right away. With my film camera I can take several photos, drop my slide film off for processing, and be happy with my shots for one to two weeks until I see them.
I mostly shoot slide film and yes it can be tricky to get the exposure right, but practice makes perfect. As long as my cameras built-in meter is correct I can get the exposure right on 95% in my shots, I’ve been shooting long enough that I have no excuses!!

I have all the K series film bodies: K1000, K1000SE, KM, KX, K2 & K2DMD and there are differences in the types of meters and the sensitivity patterns. I find I have better luck with the KX & K2’s and find the KM & K1000s harder to get the exposure right. It could also be that I have been using the KX & K2s a lot longer and am more used to them.

Phil.
07-13-2010, 05:02 PM   #42
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The KX and K2/K2DMD have center-weighted meter patterns while the KM and K1000/K1000SE have averaging types.
With the latter it's a good idea to take a closeup meter reading then recompose or simply compensate based on your evaluation of the scene.

Chris
07-13-2010, 05:18 PM   #43
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QuoteOriginally posted by ChrisPlatt Quote
The KX and K2/K2DMD have center-weighted meter patterns while the KM and K1000/K1000SE have averaging types.
With the latter it's a good idea to take a closeup meter reading then recompose or simply compensate based on your evaluation of the scene.

Chris
Yep and the KX & K2 also have a SPD sensing meter and the K1000 & KM a CdS.

Phil.
07-13-2010, 06:33 PM   #44
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Properly functioning both cell types are equally capable of giving accurate readings in most lighting.
However knowledge of the cameras meter sensitivity pattern must be considered for proper use.

Chris
07-13-2010, 06:35 PM   #45
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QuoteOriginally posted by unixrevolution Quote
Is there a particular reason why? I always thought that TTL metering would be the best way to do it. The best external meter is still only guessing at what exact area appears in-frame in an SLR, and what the lens is doing to that light.
TTL meters are great and a wonderful convenience particularly when shooting macro or with filters. The main difference between them and a hand-held meter is how the two are used. With a TTL meter, you meter reflected light within the frame. With a hand-held meter you meter either elements of the scene (reflected, per Tuco's comments above) or the amount of light hitting the subject (incident). About the only case where TTL is used the same as hand-held is when metering a landscape shot. In that case, it is good to know the FOV for the meter. My Luna Lux measures at about 30 degrees which is about the same as a "normal" lens on most formats.


Steve


BTW...Several of my cameras lack built-in meters that work. I am getting real used to manually metering a scene...
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