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11-02-2010, 12:58 PM   #1
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ISO/ASA 20-3200 on k1000

Hi everyone,

Two questions:

1: What is ASA?

2: What does it mean for the k1000 to have an ISO range from 20-3200??

question 2 expanded:
My K100D dslr ISO range is 200-3200

2a: what is 20-100 represent?
2b: Are those really ISO speeds?
2c: Film is really that fast?
2d: What conditions does one expect to use 20-100 speeds?

Thanks.

11-02-2010, 03:04 PM   #2
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ASA and ISO are the same. they deliberately made the choice wider to make the camera futureproof. That's good, because I beleve there are films in that range (maybe film below ASA 100 are not made anymore, I'm not sure).
11-02-2010, 03:43 PM   #3
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Hi,

The internet is a pretty amazing thing. You can read a lot about this on Wikipedia or on many other sites.
Like elho_cid said, the ASA and ISO film speeds are the same.
Regarding your K1000, you can use any film with ISO ranging from 20 to 3200. There are still film makers like Ilford that offer ISO 25 as well as ISO 3200 films. I just got a Fuji 1600 B&W film developed and it came out great.
As you already know from your DSLR, images shot at low ISO are finer/sharper. So an ISO 25 film will have very fine grain. Pictures should be very sharp with lots of details. Also, since the top shutter speed of the K1000 is of 1/1000, by using a low ISO film you can shoot with a bigger aperture and have a narrower depth of field.
There are lots of films to choose from which not only offer you different ISO speeds, but also different contrast, colors or grain. So in a way it's like being able to change the sensor in your DSLR. Pretty cool, no?
11-02-2010, 03:45 PM   #4
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QuoteOriginally posted by Capslock118 Quote
Hi everyone,

Two questions:

1: What is ASA?

2: What does it mean for the k1000 to have an ISO range from 20-3200??

question 2 expanded:
My K100D dslr ISO range is 200-3200

2a: what is 20-100 represent?
2b: Are those really ISO speeds?
2c: Film is really that fast?
2d: What conditions does one expect to use 20-100 speeds?

Thanks.
You can get an ISO 20 B&W film made by Adox.

- ADOX CMS Film -

With a better film camera like the K2, your ASA/ISO range is 8 to 6400.

Phil.

11-02-2010, 04:01 PM   #5
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QuoteQuote:
You can get an ISO 20 B&W film made by Adox.

- ADOX CMS Film -

With a better film camera like the K2, your ASA/ISO range is 8 to 6400.

Phil.
Where would one get this film developed? i.e. where would you recommend? I doubt the typical cvs/walgreen/mart etc is the ideal solution?
11-02-2010, 05:05 PM   #6
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Actually, you can shoot slower and faster film than 20-3200 in a K1000 really easy. For, say, EI6400, all you have to do is set the meter to 3200 and stop the camera down one more stop after you get a middle needle reading either by aperture or shutter speed. Similarly with slower film but open it up. ISO encompasses both ASA and DIN definitions in it but like everyone said, you can just treat them as meaning the same.
11-02-2010, 06:50 PM   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by Capslock118 Quote
Where would one get this film developed? i.e. where would you recommend? I doubt the typical cvs/walgreen/mart etc is the ideal solution?
A Lab that does traditional B&W processing.

Phil.
11-03-2010, 07:34 AM   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by gofour3 Quote
A Lab that does traditional B&W processing.

Phil.
Or, learn to do it yourself. Developing B & W is not hard and it doesn't require a lot of expensive equipment. Its really kind of fun. I haven't done it for a long time, but it was neat to open the developing tank and see those negatives for the first time.

All you really need is a developing tank, with the appropriate reels, a good thermometer and a source of running water. A changing bag is handy, but a closet or bathroom that you can seal to be completely dark will do just fine. You only need to load the film into the tank in absolute darkness. AFter that, everything is done in daylight.

BTW, ASA stands for Ameican Standards Association. ISO stands for Internation Standards Organization. In the olden days, when your K1000 was new, ASA was the authority in the US. Sometime between the sixties and today, the ISO adopted almost identical procedures for rating film sensitivity, as those used by ASA, so the two numbers are, for most purposes, interchangeable.

Back then, many film emulsions were slower than ISO 100. Kodachrome was, for many years, ASA 25. The last Kodachrome was ISO 64. There was a version of Kodachrome that was ISO 200, but that was discontinued several years ago.

Some film shooters expose their film at ASA/ISO settings above or below what the manufacturer recommends. They do this because they like the way it affects the tonal gradations, or because they need a faster film. The latter is called pushing the film, and you compensate by leaving the film in the developer a little longer than the instructions call for. This sort of thing is especially prevalent with B & W film.


Last edited by noblepa; 11-03-2010 at 07:41 AM.
11-03-2010, 08:00 AM   #9
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QuoteQuote:
Or, learn to do it yourself. Developing B & W is not hard and it doesn't require a lot of expensive equipment. Its really kind of fun. I haven't done it for a long time, but it was neat to open the developing tank and see those negatives for the first time.

All you really need is a developing tank, with the appropriate reels, a good thermometer and a source of running water. A changing bag is handy, but a closet or bathroom that you can seal to be completely dark will do just fine. You only need to load the film into the tank in absolute darkness. AFter that, everything is done in daylight.

Yes, I'm starting to take interest into doing that, doing research on that now. I'm thinking about setting myself up to develop the negatives then scan them into my laptop, rather than making prints.
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