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11-25-2007, 09:19 AM   #1
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Slide Film Processing and mounting

If there are any slide film shooters here I would like to know where you send your exposed rolls to be processed and mounted.

I haven't shot slide film since the good 'ole days when purchasing 'Kodak 64 Ektachrome' meant the processing and mounting was included. I don't know if film companies do that service any more.

I am interested in trying some Fuji Velvia 50 but want to be sure of where to send the roll once exposed.

I would appreciate any help. Thanks.

11-25-2007, 12:38 PM   #2
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If there is no one in your area that will do slide processing, you can do it yourself. It is not as difficult as it looks, and you do not need a dark room to do it. You can do it in your kitchen or bathroom.

You can find the actual process on the net.

You will need a light safe film changing bag, a film developing can, the developing chemicals, a thermometer, storage bottles for the chemicals and measuring cups to measure the volume of the chemicals, a can opener, a small pair of scissors, a clock/timer and a box of slide frames.

Note: check the volume needed for the developing can by placing the film reels in the can then fill the can with water until the reels are covered. Measure the amount of water that it takes to cover each real and compare this with the recommended volume. Make sure you have enough developing solution to cover the film. If You do not get enough you will not develop the entire frame, also if you have too much it will not give enough room to agitate.


After you have exposed several rolls of film and are ready to develop it, mix up your chemicals according to directions. Place them in a warm water bath and bring them up to the proper temperature. Some of these chemicals do not store very well so do not mix them up until you are ready to use them.

Place the film, developing can, can opener and scissors in the changing bag and seal it up. Place both your hands in the changing bag and open the film can with the can opener, cut off the leader portion of the film and place it on the real. When you get to the end of the film cut it off at the tape if you leave a little tape on the film it will not hurt, just don't cut through the exposed film, Also make sure you do not cut into the changing bag, this will allow light to enter the bag and will destroy your film. Make sure you put film on the real correctly note 2 layers of film should touch each other. Place it in the developing can and seal it up.

Next poor the measured developing solution in the developing can. Tap it on the counter to dislodge any air bubbles, And agitate for the proper amount of time. Poor the chemical back into the container. From here simply follow the directions for rinsing, reversing bath , color Developer, conditioner, bLeach, fixer, stabilizer.

Remove the film from the developing real and hang it out to dry. You can use a pair of rubber gloves to squeegee the water droplets off the film, be careful not to scratch the film.

Once the film is dry, carefully cut the individual frames apart and place them in the slide frames.

You're done.

Although it does take a little time to do this, it is not difficult. Once you start developing you need to finish don't stop until you have done the final step.


I hope this helps.

Joe1955


Update; for a more detailed explanation, you might want to check out this link.

Doing your own E6 processing at home

I have not read it completely, but it seems to have very good information on E6 developing.

Last edited by joe1955; 11-25-2007 at 01:31 PM.
11-25-2007, 01:47 PM   #3
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And you've done this, yourself?

QuoteOriginally posted by joe1955 Quote
If there is no one in your area that will do slide processing, you can do it yourself. It is not as difficult as it looks, and you do not need a dark room to do it. You can do it in your kitchen or bathroom.

You can find the actual process on the net.

...//...

I hope this helps.

Joe1955


Update; for a more detailed explanation, you might want to check out this link.

I have not read it completely, but it seems to have very good information on E6 developing.


Frankly, finding a lab for slide film is just a Google search away. I'm lucky to have a very fine lab just a hop,skip & jump away: Carl's Darkroom--he has a web site.
11-25-2007, 02:46 PM   #4
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Thanks for the replies. I don't plan on taking a lot of slide film so purchasing all the chemicals and equipment may be a bit cost prohibitive at this juncture. Many years ago I had a small darkroom for B&W but all that knowledge and equipment is long gone.

I checked Carl's out and his prices seem reasonable - $5.75 for developed and mounted - for a roll of 36 exposures. It would be nice to find a Canadian place but not completely necessary.

11-25-2007, 04:37 PM   #5
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I use Downtown Camera in Toronto. I walk in, but they might offer mail-in service as well.

I pay $13.99 for 36 exposure E6 processing with high-res (i.e. 3000x2000) scanning.

Their turnaround times are fast, and the quality of scans is nice. They don't over-sharpen or blow out the highlights.
11-25-2007, 11:20 PM   #6
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For a start, Kodak's got a Kodak Pro Lab Resource Locator on their website.

I love the kodak website, though, I don't have much interest their slide films.

I wish processing was still included (if it ever was here in Oz) for slide film, as some of it is shockingly expensive (Astia, Provia, I'm lookin' at you.)
11-26-2007, 03:24 AM   #7
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I just take mine to my neighborhood pro, who sells cameras and film and handles film developing drop-offs as a sideline. I get Fuji film products back in about two days, with Kodak taking about twice as long.

I never have my slides mounted. I just get them in sleeves like negatives, with the difference being that they include a semi-opaque sheet in back of the slides to even out the light when viewing them on a light table. I always just scan them into the computer anyway, so mounting would just be an unnecessary extra expense for me.
11-26-2007, 04:28 AM   #8
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Thanks again folks!

I wasn't aware of the Kodak Lab search feature, that pulled up 4 labs in Ontario. Although all but one are in Toronto it is still a place to start. I end up in Toronto at least a few times a year for business so that my be an option. If I used a courier service that would significantly add to the cost.

I am getting some options here - this is good!


Last edited by J.Scott; 11-26-2007 at 04:36 AM.
11-26-2007, 04:42 AM   #9
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Velvia is habit-forming. Don't say nobody warned you.
11-26-2007, 04:23 PM   #10
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DNT photo, who used ot be at 14th Ave and Woodbine in Markham, moved to King St in Oshawa. Not sure if they are still in business, but a roll of 36 mounted was around $15.00 with 3 hour service.

Nothing in my area anymore, so i gave up on slides. B&W is harder to do around here aswell.

Dave
12-01-2007, 12:09 PM   #11
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Jeff,

In the late 50s to early 60s, my 35mm shooting was with b/w film processed into prints.
Around 1962 I made the switch to Ektachrome and slides, still using my original 35mm camera,
a Petri, the model of which I no longer remember.
When I made the move to Ektachrome slides, I sent all of my film to the then Seattle
Filmworks in Seattle, WA. Excellent service.
In 1970, I became a Pentax devotee when I purchased my first Pentax, the Spotmatic.
This served me well, but was finally replaced by the ZX-7 about 6-7 years ago.
In recent years, in an effort to have a company name more in keeping with photo trends,
they changed their name to PhotoWorks.com.
At the time, Seattle Filmworks was offering their own replacement 35mm film. It was
modified (I think professional 16mm, or whatever the industry uses) professional movie film
and required special processing that your typical 1-hr mini-lab doesn't provide. A few years
ago (the now PhotoWorks.com) they switched to regular C-41 process 35mm made in Italy.
Although not a professional grade film, it is a good all-around general purpose film. The
last time I bought film from them was about 18 months ago (for one of my granddaughters).
They were offering only ISOs 200 and 400 in both 24 and 36 exposure rolls. The price was
the same for both exposures. I believe they offer a 4-pack and a 10-pack. I ordered a 10-
pack of 36 exposure at a cost of $12.95 postpaid!
To have slides made, you don't have to exclusively use Ektachrome. Any print film will do.
I always used their film and for many years only had slides produced. In later years, I got
prints in addition to the slides.
When you send your film to them, if you provide them with your email address, they will
notify you when your photos are ready to be viewed (before they're printed). You can
select only the ones you want printed. If you're doing slides, I don't know if you can select
certain images, or if you have to do the entire roll.
At one time, they used to list the availability of film on their website, PhotoWorks.com,
but now you have to get their 800 number from the web site and then call them to see what
is available.
Another nice service is they'll archive your photos on their computer where you can access
them at any time.
You can also upload digitals images to them for processing. Their website is worth having
a look at.
I would continue to utilize them for my digital needs but for the fact that I'm a Fuji-trained
mini-lab technician now working parttime in a Target store 1-hr mini-lab. I'm twice-retired and
look at my current "career" a most-enjoyable hobby and not work! In any event, I do all of
my digital photo processing at work where I receive the typical employee discount.
You might check with PhotoWorks.com and see if they have a mail-in depository in the
Vancouver, BC area. I don't know how much of a hassle it would be to mail your film to them
in Seattle.

Cheers,
Al
12-01-2007, 02:57 PM   #12
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Jeff,

I was curious about processing slide film, so I checked the PhotoWorks.com web site.
They process E-6 & K-14 (Kodachrome) slides only; no prints, scanning services or pictures on
disk.
After going to PhotoWorks.com, click on Help in top right corner and then in the search box,
just type in "slide processing" and you'll come up with all of the info.
They ship to all over the world.

Cheers,
Al
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