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12-02-2014, 09:26 AM   #3556
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QuoteOriginally posted by Nesster Quote
I doubt I'll be enough of a masochist to try 120 on metal reels.


The experience is not that bad since the length is short and the reels are beefier.


Steve

12-02-2014, 01:33 PM   #3557
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Here is a photo of the new library in Halifax. I need to go back and see if I can get the 'cube' to have a more square bottom. The bright lights in the bottom are the sun reflecting off the building. It was a bit of a surprise how it came out. Almost looks like a space ship landing. Shot with a Pentax MX and a 20 or 35 mm (I need to get better at remembering these details) on FP4. Developed in HC 110 1:32 for 7.5 minutes.

---------- Post added 12-02-2014 at 04:49 PM ----------


Nesster:

I also recently picked up some stainless reels because I could put 36 exposures on them much easier than the plastic reels. It took a little getting used to but I think I have the hang of it. Typically I slightly bend the negatives into an open c shape and slide it into the reel, catching it with my other hand. I sandwich the film between a damp thumb (good grip on the negative) and the spring clip. I push down on the spring clip (with the film in between still) and pull the film between it and the reel. When I tried holding downd the spring and pushing the film in I had significant difficulties. (This would depend on what style of reel you have of course). As for rolling the film on the biggest thing that has helped me is to push 4-5" of film onto the reels at a time and have the reels roll on a table top (I do this in a darkroom instead of a canging bag) then I shift everything back. This allows me to angle the incoming film and be sure it seats properly because you feel it in the resistance when it does not. I find I can hear it sliding onto the reels which lets me know it is going on right. With the 120 I have a Nikkor with a weird clip that I had trouble loading properly that would ruin the first one or two of my pictures.
All to say at first I was a little scared to use them and there was a larger learning curve than the plastic reels but now I find them easier and faster to load.
Dan

Last edited by dracluff; 12-02-2014 at 01:54 PM.
12-02-2014, 02:14 PM   #3558
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QuoteOriginally posted by stevebrot Quote
NR (noise reduction) software is something we don't use in film photography. The equivalent of sensor noise really does not exist. We do have grain, but it is from that grain that the image is built and it is not a good thing to get rid of it.
Steve,

Many thanks - I'm aware what NR is, and quite a few people use it in their analogue/digital workflows… Cuthbert's shot looked remarkably grain free for a 400ASA 35mm film, that's all. I suspect his lab used a degree of noise(/grain) reduction, not that he's aware as he doesn't PP his shots himself!
12-03-2014, 02:24 AM - 1 Like   #3559
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Old, shot in France.


Pentax ME + Kodak Tmusic 100
by Giu Behringer

12-03-2014, 02:40 AM   #3560
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QuoteOriginally posted by rob1234 Quote
Steve,

Many thanks - I'm aware what NR is, and quite a few people use it in their analogue/digital workflows… Cuthbert's shot looked remarkably grain free for a 400ASA 35mm film, that's all. I suspect his lab used a degree of noise(/grain) reduction, not that he's aware as he doesn't PP his shots himself!
The lab is Boots (a pharmacy in the UK that also offers some developing service, sometimes they good a goob job, sometimes they are pretty bad), they used a Frontier machine and the lady who did that once told she just inserts the negatives in the machine and then the pics come out! I seriously doubt that there is a NR or anything sophisticated, as far as I remember the Frontier is a pretty old machine.

IMO it's all merit of the film,if correctly exposed the BW400CN gives results like this:

12-03-2014, 03:12 AM   #3561
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Spent the week running a test roll through my 'new' Zorki-4, which I really enjoyed using, apart from the usual joy of rewinding a Russian camera.
Jupiter-8 lens at f4, TMax 400 developed in R09 One-Shot for 8 minutes at 1:25.



I also had my CE-5 with me, and my girlfriend took it off me to snap a photo of me with my new toy. We'll turn her into a proper film user yet.
Chinon CE-5, Auto Revuenon 50/1.4 at f4, Delta 400, same developer for 6 minutes.

12-03-2014, 03:19 AM   #3562
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Funny I didn;t know we had another film BW-only thread going - here is x-posted from other places.

Meet Paul, one of the protesters standing outside of the Marie Stopes International clinic in Buckhurst Hill, England. They were praying and demonstrating against the abortions that are performed there every day. A very kind man, genuinely concerned with the deaths of thousands of unborn babies being killed every year in the UK. Later the same day they took part in an anti-abortion '500 crosses for Life' prayer procession which started at Westminster Cathedral and ended outside Westminster Abbey, London

Shot with Olympus 35RC and Ilford FP4 125 Plus



12-03-2014, 04:20 AM   #3563
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QuoteOriginally posted by dracluff Quote
Nesster:

I also recently picked up some stainless reels because I could put 36 exposures on them much easier than the plastic reels. It took a little getting used to but I think I have the hang of it. Typically I slightly bend the negatives into an open c shape and slide it into the reel, catching it with my other hand. I sandwich the film between a damp thumb (good grip on the negative) and the spring clip. I push down on the spring clip (with the film in between still) and pull the film between it and the reel. When I tried holding downd the spring and pushing the film in I had significant difficulties. (This would depend on what style of reel you have of course). As for rolling the film on the biggest thing that has helped me is to push 4-5" of film onto the reels at a time and have the reels roll on a table top (I do this in a darkroom instead of a canging bag) then I shift everything back. This allows me to angle the incoming film and be sure it seats properly because you feel it in the resistance when it does not. I find I can hear it sliding onto the reels which lets me know it is going on right. With the 120 I have a Nikkor with a weird clip that I had trouble loading properly that would ruin the first one or two of my pictures.
All to say at first I was a little scared to use them and there was a larger learning curve than the plastic reels but now I find them easier and faster to load.
Dan
thanks for the encouragement and advice! I can see how eventually it will be easier and faster...

Here's one partially screwed up photo, I just put the women's faces in the white spot on the bottom



12-03-2014, 06:43 AM   #3564
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QuoteOriginally posted by rob1234 Quote
Steve,

Many thanks - I'm aware what NR is, and quite a few people use it in their analogue/digital workflows… Cuthbert's shot looked remarkably grain free for a 400ASA 35mm film, that's all. I suspect his lab used a degree of noise(/grain) reduction, not that he's aware as he doesn't PP his shots himself!
There is also a clarity adjustment that can soften a picture. Take Portra 400 and convert it to a gray scale image and that is what C-41 BW film/grain looks like. It does not have the same grain structure of BW film since it basically color film with dyes instead of silver.
12-03-2014, 06:54 AM   #3565
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QuoteOriginally posted by tuco Quote
There is also a clarity adjustment that can soften a picture. Take Portra 400 and convert it to a gray scale image and that is what C-41 BW film/grain looks like. It does not have the same grain structure of BW film since it basically color film with dyes instead of silver.
Exactly, it's convenient to use but in many ways lacks the character of a Tri -X or other classic b/w
12-03-2014, 07:07 AM   #3566
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Cough Cough...



This is a pic that I posted elsewhere, taken with a Spottie F and Portra 160. It is clearly grainy.
12-03-2014, 08:24 AM   #3567
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QuoteOriginally posted by Cuthbert Quote
Cough Cough...
This is a pic that I posted elsewhere, taken with a Spottie F and Portra 160. It is clearly grainy.
There are more variables to it than your one post. The state of the development chemicals for one and your exposure. You can shoot Portra plus or minus one stop of under/over box speed rating easily. The grain will be finer at the lower EI with portra. I have some Portra 400 that is pretty fine grain shot at EI 200, for example.
12-03-2014, 08:45 AM   #3568
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QuoteOriginally posted by Cuthbert Quote
I seriously doubt that there is a NR or anything sophisticated, as far as I remember the Frontier is a pretty old machine.
Most minilab scans involve a fair amount of smoothing as well as sharpening with huge potential for artifact as well. That is the main reason why I started scanning my own. They can turn it off, but the operators often don't know how.

QuoteOriginally posted by Cuthbert Quote
IMO it's all merit of the film,if correctly exposed the BW400CN gives results like this:
Yes, the ISO 400 chromogenic B&W films tend to have a smoother look than say, Tri-X


Steve
12-03-2014, 09:10 AM   #3569
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QuoteOriginally posted by stevebrot Quote
Most minilab scans involve a fair amount of smoothing as well as sharpening with huge potential for artifact as well. That is the main reason why I started scanning my own. They can turn it off, but the operators often don't know how.

Steve
In this case the operator didn't even know how the machine works:"I put the film inside and I collect them developed!"

I doubt she's involved in smoothing up pics of making them look better, on the other side the Portra 160 was developed by a tech with 40 years of experience.

On the other side I got excellent results with Delta 400 in the roll of my infamous self portraits at f1.2 and 2.0:





Almost as good as with BW400CN, even if the latter offers more "shades of grey", when I'm back at home I want to start developing at home also because labs are getting more and more expensive, I have no clue on how to develop C-41, tough.
12-03-2014, 10:55 AM   #3570
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QuoteOriginally posted by Cuthbert Quote
I doubt she's involved in smoothing up pics of making them look better,
That means the operator is using the default in the software configuration which was set by the technician of the machine. So you cannot make any assumptions as to what is being done to your final output. That's why we say you are getting post processing done on your images even though you do not do it yourself.

QuoteQuote:
I have no clue on how to develop C-41, tough
Don't be intimidated by the process. You can get one-liter kits to mix up and that will do about 15-20 rolls if used within about 3 or more months after mixing.

If you can develop BW, you can also do C-41. It takes a little more care in getting the temperature right but apart from that it is not too much different. You can use a beverage cooler filled with hot water at the correct temperature to place your bottles ( after you heat them up) and place the development tank in while you agitate it. It will hold the temp long enough to get through the 3.5 minute development cycle which is the most critical.
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