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11-16-2011, 04:09 PM   #31
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Which camera

QuoteOriginally posted by Kaufeetime Quote
Itís only a guess, but you never shot film and only interested in film as a hobby. For that reason I suggest, finding a nice point & shoot like the Pentax IQ Zoom. Its an easy camera to learn and your first roll of pictures will look great. Unlike the SLR where there is a learning phase. If you are serious about 'old vintage retro looking pictures consider one of the multitudes of old school Kodakís.
Learning to use a fully manual camera isn't a big deal. Millions (trillions?) of pictures have been made with cameras most people today would consider toys. Many of these cameras were made to be used out of doors in average light. All you need is some basic exposure guidelines such as the "sunny 16 rule" Sunny 16 rule - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Many of them used 35mm film and many others 120 film, both of which is readily available (though 120 would cost you more). I understand you are coming at this from an artistic point of view and want to experiment. So, find some old working camera for cheap, something like an Argus C3 or C4, and go have fun.

11-16-2011, 04:45 PM   #32
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QuoteOriginally posted by vsl3-e Quote
if you want the lomo look i recommend buying LOMO 35mm film and a camera with electronic contacts on the mount, this means a Pentax SuperA (in the US its called Super Progam) or a newer model. Then buy the DA18-55 kit lens for it. The lens is not very sharp on 35mm, you have vignetting like with a Holga, strong distortion, but its also very practical since you can zoom. Its also a very cheap combo!

Here is an example using my pentax super A, dal 18-55 and Kodak film ( i guess the retro feel will be stronger with LOMO film)
I like the effect <#
11-16-2011, 04:49 PM   #33
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QuoteOriginally posted by Kaufeetime Quote
Itís only a guess, but you never shot film and only interested in film as a hobby. For that reason I suggest, finding a nice point & shoot like the Pentax IQ Zoom. Its an easy camera to learn and your first roll of pictures will look great. Unlike the SLR where there is a learning phase. If you are serious about 'old vintage retro looking pictures consider one of the multitudes of old school Kodakís.
QuoteOriginally posted by jeverettfine Quote
Learning to use a fully manual camera isn't a big deal. Millions (trillions?) of pictures have been made with cameras most people today would consider toys. Many of these cameras were made to be used out of doors in average light. All you need is some basic exposure guidelines such as the "sunny 16 rule" Sunny 16 rule - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Many of them used 35mm film and many others 120 film, both of which is readily available (though 120 would cost you more). I understand you are coming at this from an artistic point of view and want to experiment. So, find some old working camera for cheap, something like an Argus C3 or C4, and go have fun.
Yes, its actually my first time to shoot film camera if ever, and I think I'm having a great idea now, on what to purchase.
11-16-2011, 05:26 PM   #34
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QuoteOriginally posted by John Poirier Quote
If the "vintage" look you are seeking is what you see on the "film shots" thread in this forum, much of that is due to lousy commercial scanning. Most labs don't even charge extra for it!
-OR-

cheap film (e.g. my Ferrania shots)

-OR-

intentional attention given in PP (e.g. again...my Ferrania shots)

-OR-

true vintage gear with uncoated lenses (e.g. much of Nesster's work)


All that being said. A decent Pentax camera in good repair with Pentax optics in reasonable condition with decent film and scanning will give you anything BUT the standard Lomography look.


Steve

11-16-2011, 05:42 PM   #35
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I’d go with a K1000 and whatever 50/55mm lens that comes with it. Just get a few special effects filters, like a soft & fisheye, to play around with.

For film you can try Rollei Redbird/Blackbird and Ilford SFX.

Phil.
11-16-2011, 08:50 PM   #36
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QuoteOriginally posted by gofour3 Quote
Iíd go with a K1000 and whatever 50/55mm lens that comes with it. Just get a few special effects filters, like a soft & fisheye, to play around with.
Aim for a better 50mm than the f/2 which was the typical K1000 "kit lens". (It'll say 1:2 on the lens). It's significantly inferior to the 50mm f/1.7, which you should be able to pick up for $50.
11-17-2011, 09:03 PM   #37
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QuoteOriginally posted by vsl3-e Quote
Here is an example using my pentax super A, dal 18-55 and Kodak film ( i guess the retro feel will be stronger with LOMO film)
Wow even the vignette is sharp! I tell you why shoot with glass, when you can use plastic? But seriously I think that the barrelling on the picture came out nice. However, IMO I think that trying to get the cheap plastic lens effect with anything other than a cheap plastic lens, just doesn't work. For what it's worth I think the same about all those photoshop apps that do the same thing. It's times like this that I wish I had a scanner.
11-18-2011, 12:59 AM   #38
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The way I see it, if you're going to go retro and shoot film, you might as well use a manual camera. A Spotmatic or K1000 would be my choice.

11-18-2011, 05:37 AM   #39
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+1 on the Olympus XA suggestion—my first serious foray into film photography was being attracted to lomography, and then immediately balking at the absurd prices of Lomos. After some research, I stumbled across a website extolling the virtues of the XA as a vastly superior camera that was cheaper (used—it's an oldish camera), could pull off the Lomo 'look' (the lens vignettes a bit wide open), but was also capable of being used as a serious photographic tool. It has a sharp zuiko lens, decent handling, interesting design story, and compact as all heck. Fun, fun, fun.

I'm on my third one (first one was a lemon, second got stolen in Thailand). I love them. Least of all for any lomo-esque aspirations (which I got over pretty quickly—it gets tired), but it's definitely capable of giving you that experience, or pretty close.

The only thing that's threatened to dethrone it as my go-to small rangefinder is my Konica Auto S3. A wee bit bigger, (and seemingly a whooole lot rarer) but damn is the lens nice. Had it restored by a local repair shop, and I anticipate shooting with it now and again until I pass the thing onto my kids (of which I have none yet).

In any case, either of the above options will put good, small, reliable, semi-automatic, QUIET and fun rangefinders into your hands. Focusing with a rangefinder (which I love), while a bit different than the zone-focusing schtick on Lomos, is great for the kind of walkabout street photography that it sounds like you want to do. Grabbing an SLR of any kind, even a lightweight, unobtrusive one like a small pentax, is going to give you a considerably different shooting experience, and will be significantly louder, due to the kaCHUNK of the mirror slap. This last point is why a great many historical street photographers used rangefinders with leaf shutters: it's easier to go unnoticed while you're plugging away in public.
11-18-2011, 11:12 AM   #40
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I would take into consideration the ME which is my only pentax film camera,it produces excelent results everytime and the automation isnt a a bad thing,it helps so every photo you take is perfect and the TTL meetering gets it right everytime.

Last edited by Hayob; 11-19-2011 at 02:38 PM.
11-18-2011, 01:59 PM   #41
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QuoteOriginally posted by Timichango Quote
+1 on the Olympus XA suggestion
Given the OP's goal, I would definitely second the advise. My XA, coupled with cheap film and appropriate PP fits nicely into the Lomography paradigm. For example pictures:

Fotostevia Olympus XA Pics
11-18-2011, 06:30 PM   #42
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"What's the best Pentax film SLR to purchase?" Of course, they are the latest MZ series: MZ-S, 5N, 6, and 7. S and 5N have pentaprism VF. These cameras are very quiet, there is no such "kaCHUNK of the mirror slap" as in older heavy metal behemoths.

Last edited by violini; 11-18-2011 at 06:36 PM.
11-18-2011, 07:30 PM   #43
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I bought the Program Plus, 25 years ago, after my Spotmatic went through it's second shutter in 6 months. Those old film cameras, once you've had enough shutter activations, the groove the shutter curtain slides in gets to be too wide and worn, and even if you put a new shutter in it, it wears out quickly. My first shutter lasted 15 years, the second lasted 6 months. Anyway, I digress, if memory serves me well , the reason I bought the Program Plus was it was the last one with a completely mechanical shutter. (Feel free to correct me if I'm wrong.) If your battery is completely dead you can still set it to manual, set your shutter speed to 1/100, (at ISO 100) , and an object in direct sunlight will need an aperture set at f-16. You just calcu-guess your exposure from there. Any of us old guys who grew up light meter in hand can guess an exposure without even thinking about it.
11-18-2011, 07:51 PM   #44
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QuoteOriginally posted by normhead Quote
the reason I bought the Program Plus was it was the last one with a completely mechanical shutter. (Feel free to correct me if I'm wrong.) If your battery is completely dead you can still set it to manual, set your shutter speed to 1/100, (at ISO 100) , and an object in direct sunlight will need an aperture set at f-16.
I think that you've confused the Program Plus with something else. I just tried mine and without batteries it's a brick. Although, I do agree a mechanical shutter speeds is one of things that I like about this vintage of camera.
11-19-2011, 06:01 AM   #45
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QuoteOriginally posted by stevebrot Quote
Given the OP's goal, I would definitely second the advise. My XA, coupled with cheap film and appropriate PP fits nicely into the Lomography paradigm. For example pictures:

Fotostevia Olympus XA Pics
Some nice shots there (and in the rest of your photostream). First shot in the series you linked (XA & Super Program back-to-back) cracked me up a bitóI just got a Super Program yesterday, and had staged that exact scene on my kitchen counter earlier today.

Here are a few of my more 'Lomo-esque' shots taken with the XA....








For a while I was shooting Fuji Pro 800 through the XA at 400iso, and was consistently impressed by the color and contrast that this combo was producing in moderate light.... some of my favourite shots ever were captured using that setup.
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