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03-12-2012, 07:19 PM   #31
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QuoteOriginally posted by normhead Quote
Is that because you tried it and didn't like it? Or is it a moral issue?
I'm holding out for a "Full Frame".



03-12-2012, 07:21 PM   #32
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QuoteOriginally posted by womble Quote
It always seems a shame to me to stick cameras in a glass case when they should be out and about taking superb images. You might as well just buy broken ones if they are just going to be dust collectors.

Best wishes, Kris.
I feel the same way, except that my rotation is getting a little extended! It has been over a year since I shot with the Mamiya 1000 DTL or the Singlex TLS! The rangefinders have been getting all of the attention!


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03-12-2012, 08:38 PM   #33
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QuoteOriginally posted by gofour3 Quote
Your K20D will be obsolete and broken within five years and will never be collectible. Itís just another consumer electronics gadget that is destined for landfill
So true. It's amazing how well made these film cameras are from 30...40...50+ years ago.

I assume everyone here can appreciate art (since we all call ourselves photographers of some level). What's wrong with appreciating the aesthetic camera design of old behind glass. I'd consider my MX a piece of art.
03-12-2012, 08:42 PM   #34
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Nobody ever sold an artwork using the tag line, "Just hold a Kandinsky."

03-12-2012, 08:44 PM   #35
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No one looks at a Ferrari Dino at a car show and says to themselves "what a shame, someone else would get so much more use and pleasure out of it as a daily driver."
03-12-2012, 09:27 PM   #36
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I don't mean to sound like film is obsolete, (though it seems I said just that) its just not possible for my application, given the choice I would rather shoot film, especially since I fully agree digital cameras are spectacular pieces of shit compared to any old mechanical 35mm film camera, but then that's entirely the reason why I want to collect them even if I can't use them.
But a good example is tonight, I lost half my long exposure shots of traffic passing below a freeway overpass, either because the cars didn't pattern like I expect and the image was dull, or someone would unexpectedly turn onto the bridge and shake things all over the place making the shot fuzzy. After that I went into town and took a picture of a street and it took me 3 tries to find the balance between overexposure on stuff in the window displays and underexposure of everything else. I deleted the bad pics as I took them so I wouldn't have to sort them later just by pressing delete and hitting yes as the preview came up.

Film will always beat digital to death for sheer image quality, that's a no brainer. But I just can't find a way to make it practical with the way I shoot and I find I take more pleasure in the experimenting and playing around then I do with the meticulous setup and capture, I do mostly use the M mode for shooting but I never know how something will turn out till I try it. Were I using film I wouldn't know what I have until I develop it.
I make digital work money wise by keeping my quality vintage glass and just picking up a new digital body when they fall into the sub $400 range used (like my K20D), paying $1200 for a camera is idiotic.
03-12-2012, 09:38 PM   #37
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Any good Spottie preferably in black, that's it. I'm very partial to the SPII's myself but other Spotties are good too. I don't think any camera Pentax ever made ever even came close to the elegance of my SPII's but there are others I have used and liked. I like my K1000 and it looks like I'll like my black Spottie F if the batteries ever get here and I actually get to use it, sigh. People always say they prefer the K mount to the M42 mount but honestly I think the M42 mount suits me just as well. No big difference until you go to AF lenses for me.

For me an all black mint SPII is still the holy grail of vintage cameras. As much as I love all the other cameras in my growing little collection I still badly covet that one. No matter how many times I look at all my gear and firmly tell myself I don't NEED one, I think I do. It's been more than a bit of an obsession with me. One day I will likely save my pennies and finally get me one, but for now my black Spottie F and all my zebra Spotties are a more than acceptable substitute. But if I had to pick one old Pentax SLR to suggest it would be that one. Zebra or black I find the SPII to be exceptional.
03-12-2012, 11:22 PM   #38
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QuoteOriginally posted by PPPPPP42 Quote
I don't mean to sound like film is obsolete...
This post makes much more sense to me than your original one, and are similar reasons as to mine for using digital for macros, for example.

Although it was made somewhat facetiously, the suggestion of buying non-working cameras does actually make some sense if you really never, ever intend to use them.

@ironlionzion No-one would think it a shame that it wasn't used for a daily commute, but we would all like to take it out for a spin. A more apt comparison would be to compare someone who took it out a few times a year to someone who never let it leave the garage.

@stevebrot I also know that feeling. Some of my cameras (e.g., my LX or my FED2) get much, much more use than others (e.g., my A3 or my MV1).

Cheers, K.

03-13-2012, 07:23 AM   #39
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I just bought batteries for my super program for the first time in a decade, this is a step in the wrong direction, you can all go die in a fire now.

Does anyone have a used complete darkroom they don't want anymore? B&W is the only way I can see this ever working out.

Also my super program never did a metering check when I press the shutter button halfway, I had to press the little button on the left side by the lens mount for that, is this normal or broken, I forget what the manual said but I thought it was supposed to preview when you do that.
03-13-2012, 07:37 AM   #40
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Heh, there you go.

Instead of a full wet darkroom (and the time it takes to do the enlarging/printing) why not go the modern hybrid way? All you need is a nice big changing bag (or a completely darkenable room or closet), a tank, some chemistry, and a scanner that can scan film.
03-13-2012, 07:49 AM   #41
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QuoteOriginally posted by ironlionzion Quote
No one looks at a Ferrari Dino at a car show and says to themselves "what a shame, someone else would get so much more use and pleasure out of it as a daily driver."
Jay Leno drives every one of his more than 100 truly antique cars. Even the $1,000,000 Duesenberg that won Pebble Beach. His philosophy is to restore a classic car to 100-point perfect, drive it until it is 70-points and restore it again.

Someone can always fabricate a metal or plastic part for a 100% mechanical camera - they can be kept runnig literally forever..

At some future time we won't be able to find working circuit boards for cameras that have even just a meter (not to mention more complicated electronics). Sure - then they can be cosmetically restored and displayed (except for the very few crazy-wealthy people who can have capacitors and circuits fabricated).

Until that time I say, "If ya got 'em, shoot 'em"
03-13-2012, 08:17 AM   #42
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QuoteOriginally posted by PPPPPP42 Quote
Also my super program never did a metering check when I press the shutter button halfway, I had to press the little button on the left side by the lens mount for that, is this normal or broken, I forget what the manual said but I thought it was supposed to preview when you do that.
The manual says to set the mode selector dial on auto and half press the shutter to test the battery. If you get display shutter speed on the top LCD/viewfinder LCD the battery is good. If you get alternating speed/aperture and oooo ooo the battery is low. The button on the side is for the dim light assist for the viewfinder display. It will turn on the display as well and could be used to check the battery.

If your camera does not display speed/aperture in the viewfinder or top LCD on half-press, something is not right.


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03-13-2012, 08:26 AM   #43
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QuoteOriginally posted by monochrome Quote
At some future time we won't be able to find working circuit boards for cameras that have even just a meter (not to mention more complicated electronics). Sure - then they can be cosmetically restored and displayed (except for the very few crazy-wealthy people who can have capacitors and circuits fabricated).

Until that time I say, "If ya got 'em, shoot 'em"
Excellent advice! While a lot of attention is given to circuit boards and such, it is good to remember that the switches (along with solder joints) are often a point of failure. Many of the 80s era SLRs used a rubber "dome" type switch to short a conductive patch on a printed circuit. When the rubber dies, so does the camera. I have a couple of bodies that use them and will be very sad indeed when they no longer function.


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03-13-2012, 10:12 AM   #44
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QuoteOriginally posted by stevebrot Quote
Excellent advice! While a lot of attention is given to circuit boards and such, it is good to remember that the switches (along with solder joints) are often a point of failure. Many of the 80s era SLRs used a rubber "dome" type switch to short a conductive patch on a printed circuit. When the rubber dies, so does the camera. I have a couple of bodies that use them and will be very sad indeed when they no longer function.
Steve
I have an otherwise perfectly good Dell laptop that (ran) Photoshop Elements better than any other machine I have ever used that is bricked because the AC/Charger connector solder to the MotherBoard has failed. I have a decent IT/build/repair guy (not an Eric, but not bad) who has had it down to the MB and can't get it operating again.

Lenovo business class this time.
03-13-2012, 10:35 AM   #45
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QuoteOriginally posted by monochrome Quote
Jay Leno drives every one of his more than 100 truly antique cars. Even the $1,000,000 Duesenberg that won Pebble Beach. His philosophy is to restore a classic car to 100-point perfect, drive it until it is 70-points and restore it again.
If he drives one a day, each car is getting 3 days of use a year: hardly a daily driver. (He's also rich enough to afford restoring each one of his cars many times over). Many people collect items and use them every so often for pleasure. I used to collect old coins. What's the point of collecting coins when I could be spending they money? Hell, I'm not even sure what I like about it but I like it nonetheless. And I don't consider myself "depriving" the rest of the population of use of these coins

Any camera I would collect I would take out every so often to shoot with. Part of the reason I'd collect them is to give to my children 25+ years from now. You never know the availability of these cameras down the line....today excellent condition K1000s are plentiful...who knows what the market will be like in the future.
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