Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
04-05-2012, 01:18 PM   #16
Pentaxian
builttospill's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Utah, Idaho
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 1,642
QuoteOriginally posted by wlachan Quote
The LX was special, but it is history now. There are cheaper and more reliable film cameras. IMHO, some cannot get pass the fact that the LX was the only pro model ever (or the MX too if you believe marketing) and their mentality stuck in the past somehow. Canon F-1 or Nikon F-3 users of the same era have moved on long ago.
Of course F-3 users have moved on, just as they did from the F-2 and previous film bodies they used. Maybe if Pentax released an LX-2 we could move on, but what more would you want in a camera like that? I don't need to upgrade every time a new camera comes out, so what are users of Nikon's F6 doing now? They never produced the F7 so the world must be ending .

04-17-2012, 04:49 PM   #17
Senior Member
johnha's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Lancashire, UK
Posts: 250
My first Pentax was a Super-A (Super Program), I also have a couple of LXs (both of which need repair due to sticky mirrors). My biggest problem with the Super Program is that without an exposure lock you're often forced to use manual and I didn't really get on with the finder display in manual mode. I find LEDs or needles much easier to 'read' than the LCD +/- numerals of the Super Program (especially if you're more than 3 stops out).

Both have advantages and I wouldn't sell either (I did sell a Super-A once and had to pay a lot more to buy another one back!).
04-17-2012, 05:56 PM   #18
Loyal Site Supporter
Pioneer's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Elko, Nevada
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 1,167
The Pro's Tool

I am not a pro, I am not even a particularly good photographer, but I have learned that my LX is a very, very competent camera. I really enjoy using all my mechanical cameras but the LX is really something special. Because this camera is so configurable, has such a reliable and accurate, off-the-film, metering system, and provides such a great series of viewfinders and screens to work with, it can do almost any type of photography you can imagine. From landscape work, to sports events, to astro-photography, to macro-photography, to forensics, to scientific recording, and on and on, it can be set up to do it, and do it quite well. I can think of no other camera in the Pentax stable, or in any brand's stable, that is anywhere near as flexible as the LX is. I have never used the Super Program and I am sure it is a fine camera, but I am also equally sure it does not belong in the same league as the LX, and was never intended to be.

Far from being obsolete, with today's great digital scanning options, this camera just gets more and more useful as time goes by. Like I already said, I love using all my mechanical cameras, many which are not even Pentax, and they are all very capable cameras. No camera can really be best at everything, but if you are really looking for that one camera that is so good at doing so many different things, that one camera that will not interfere with you becoming the best photographer you can be, then I think that you will look long and hard before you find one that matches the capabilities of the LX. I seriously doubt that you will ever find one that surpasses it.

You may look at this camera and think that it still seems way too expensive for an old film camera, but $600 is pennies compared to what this camera can do for you if you really put it to work. Pros pay thousands for cameras that are way more specialized than this one is. Don't let the convenience of your digital cameras blind you to the possibilities that are inherent in this one, one of the best cameras ever designed. The Pentax designers worked very, very hard to build a professional tool that was capable of just about any type of photography that you could imagine, and I for one think they were very successful. Like anything else, this camera is not for everyone, but don't ever mistake it for another little consumer toy just because you don't need what it can do for you. Make no mistake, this is still one of the best cameras that was ever built.
04-17-2012, 06:35 PM   #19
Pentaxian
PPPPPP42's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Wisconsin
Photos: Albums
Posts: 845
Original Poster
People sound like they are getting defensive here.
I wasn't looking for "Its great, wonderful, amazing, the best film camera ever made" I wanted to know why.
I'm not saying the Super Program is as good as an LX, just a good camera to use as a reference since its a good quality mainstream consumer camera of the same brand and era. Some of the features mentioned are more differences than features and at that point opinion clouds things though I do like to hear peoples opinions.

A good feature mentioned is the exposure lock, which would be really handy if you shoot film on A, I have definitely noticed its missing on the SP when I used to shoot on A though I would just hop to M if A wasn't doing its job or I needed to fiddle with lighting.
Another good one is the continuous off the film metering, not really sure how much of a difference that would make for me, but I'm sure for specialized uses it would be critical.

In all honesty I really only have the SP at this point because its my first camera and has sentimental value, all I use for film nowadays is the K1000 SE which does everything I could ask for so far and doesn't lack any features I would actually use. I'm a tad old fashioned since I prefer ultra simple manual mechanical cameras that I can stick my K mount stuff on. Even depth of field preview would be kinda pointless since I already have an idea in my head about how far each stop extends (or you could use the lens scales if you want) and a self timer isn't good for much but taking pictures of yourself, I use a lockable shutter release cable for anything hands off or long exposure.
If I want something with automatic features for a day I stick with the K20D (which I also use on manual most of the time actually).

04-17-2012, 07:58 PM   #20
Loyal Site Supporter
Pioneer's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Elko, Nevada
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 1,167
I work with a K1000 SE as well. I love it and would never dream of getting rid of it. But I do find the features available with the LX to be very useful.

Each of the LX's individual features on their own are certainly useful, I have found the self timer to be useful for things other than self portraits, and the DOF preview is also a great way to judge in advance how dark a particular image may turn out to be at a given aperture. But the true value of the LX in my perspective lies in the system as a whole. Once you have the LX you are able to expand its capabilities through the use of various accessories that were available as part of the full LX camera system, and still are in most cases. Although it is a wonderful little camera, and I do love its' simplicity, the K1000 SE just cannot be configured to do all the same things the LX can do.

Although the K1000 is typically thought of as the "student camera", I recently started a photography class and have been using the LX instead as it seems to be able to do everything I need to do during these classes. I hope the camera and the class will help teach me to be a better photographer. As I mentioned, the LX certainly is not for everyone. For one, it can still be quite expensive, particularly when you factor in the cost of some of the accessories, so it may not be a cost effective solution for everyone. But if you compare the cost of an LX system against the cost of some of the digital equipment being sold today, even Pentax gear, the real cost may not be quite as high as many people believe. And with a good scanner it really does become a usable "full frame" option.

Have a great day and enjoy your cameras. They can all be great fun.
04-17-2012, 08:36 PM   #21
Pentaxian




Join Date: May 2011
Location: Santa Cruz, CA
Photos: Albums
Posts: 1,929
It is likely we all assume you can just go down the line and compare each and every feature of the LX vs anything else so I am sure we just wanted to give you an opinion on just how advantageous those features are in real world use. For instance I also have the K20D and it's live view is a godsend to attaining critical focus with my 50mm f1.2 but you know how that works. With the LX's huge bright viewfinder, I can nail critical focus easily even when the scene is metering f1.2 at 1/2 shutter speed. No doubt some features can be added after the fact like the K1000 doesn't have a self timer but you can buy those screw on self timers. It doesn't have stop down but you can release the lens to see what it would be stopped down. However, some of the LX features cannot be added in. Take the metering sensitivity and ultra long exposure capability coupled with IDM of the LX - unequaled even with an external meter. Only with the LX can you randomly go back to any frame after it has been shot. You don't have to forget to put the viewfinder blind on because no amount of light coming into it will affect the LX's metering unlike all other cameras.

As you said, your needs may not require the world of flexibility afforded by interchangeable finders and screens, IDM, MLU, batteryless operation, weather proof design and construction, random access to each frame forward and backward, titanium shutters, superb build quality, TTL flash, built-in diopter, unparalleled meter in the most compact configuration housing all these. If you have a need for any of these features it can be better then another choice that doesn't have them. That it is no longer made and that some of these features are not available in any other camera - past or present, makes it more valuable.
04-18-2012, 02:34 PM   #22
Senior Member
johnha's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Lancashire, UK
Posts: 250
QuoteOriginally posted by PPPPPP42 Quote
A good feature mentioned is the exposure lock, which would be really handy if you shoot film on A, I have definitely noticed its missing on the SP when I used to shoot on A though I would just hop to M if A wasn't doing its job or I needed to fiddle with lighting.
I hope I haven't confused things. The LX doesn't have exposure lock either, it's just that I find it easier to use in manual mode than the Super Program.
04-18-2012, 04:40 PM   #23
Site Supporter
ChrisPlatt's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Queens NYC
Posts: 4,441
QuoteOriginally posted by johnha Quote
The LX doesn't have exposure lock
A glaring omission IMO.
The K2 didn't have it; the K2DMD added it.
Gotta wonder why Pentax left it off of the LX...

Chris

04-18-2012, 06:41 PM   #24
Site Supporter




Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Texas
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 1,116
QuoteOriginally posted by ChrisPlatt Quote
A glaring omission IMO.
The K2 didn't have it; the K2DMD added it.
Gotta wonder why Pentax left it off of the LX...

Chris
At the time the LX was introduced it was to be a "pro" camera, and back then "pros" would never admit to using auto exposure anyway...
04-19-2012, 08:41 AM   #25
Pentaxian
unixrevolution's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Waldorf, MD
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 1,846
The LX is special because of its construction, because of interchangeable finders, because of ethereally-accurate off-the-film metering (seriously, this is some awesome stuff, especially for long exposures), its random-access multiple exposure capability, and its general handling and feel.

The real party piece of the LX is the metering. Not only is the 1/2000s titanium curtain shutter stepless, but below sync speed, the light is metered directly off the film plane, and is variable. If the light changes during the exposure, the LX compensates. I know of no other Pentax...hell...no other camera that does that.

Of my 11 Pentax SLRs, it is my favorite, and I believe it to be the finest manual-focus 35mm SLR ever made. It is a workhorse that, with its surreal metering abilities, will continue to be unique and sought after for decades to come.

However, I will say the Super Program is DAMN good, and lighter and more convenient to boot. I have both, and they make a great combination!
04-20-2012, 04:06 AM   #26
Senior Member




Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 161
QuoteOriginally posted by unixrevolution Quote
The LX is special because of its construction, because of interchangeable finders, because of ethereally-accurate off-the-film metering (seriously, this is some awesome stuff, especially for long exposures), its random-access multiple exposure capability, and its general handling and feel.

The real party piece of the LX is the metering. Not only is the 1/2000s titanium curtain shutter stepless, but below sync speed, the light is metered directly off the film plane, and is variable. If the light changes during the exposure, the LX compensates. I know of no other Pentax...hell...no other camera that does that.

Of my 11 Pentax SLRs, it is my favorite, and I believe it to be the finest manual-focus 35mm SLR ever made. It is a workhorse that, with its surreal metering abilities, will continue to be unique and sought after for decades to come.

However, I will say the Super Program is DAMN good, and lighter and more convenient to boot. I have both, and they make a great combination!
----- I know of no other Pentax...hell...no other camera that does that.------

I believe the Olympus OM-4Ti does exactly that too, and has a brilliant spotmeter including AE lock. However, mine (went through 4 bodies) began giving me problems over the years and I switched to the LX. Yes, I miss the spotmeter and AE Lock, but the solution in those moments is to switch to manual. Once I became used to that, it is almost as fast and one can keep looking through the lens . . .
04-20-2012, 04:45 AM   #27
Pentaxian




Join Date: May 2011
Location: Santa Cruz, CA
Photos: Albums
Posts: 1,929
But the OM4Ti is limited to a maximum of 3minutes while the LX will stay open for as long as it takes to get the exposure, doesn't have the metering range of the LX (no unassisted camera or external meter does) as well as lacking a lot of the other LX facilities.
04-20-2012, 05:28 AM   #28
Pentaxian
unixrevolution's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Waldorf, MD
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 1,846
QuoteOriginally posted by Hilo Quote
----- I know of no other Pentax...hell...no other camera that does that.------

I believe the Olympus OM-4Ti does exactly that too, and has a brilliant spotmeter including AE lock. However, mine (went through 4 bodies) began giving me problems over the years and I switched to the LX. Yes, I miss the spotmeter and AE Lock, but the solution in those moments is to switch to manual. Once I became used to that, it is almost as fast and one can keep looking through the lens . . .
I see that it can do spot metering, and it does OTF flash metering, but I don't think it does the stepless, variable, OTF-During-Exposure thing the LX does.

I could be wrong.
04-20-2012, 09:42 AM   #29
Pentaxian




Join Date: May 2011
Location: Santa Cruz, CA
Photos: Albums
Posts: 1,929
As far as I know, the Olympus OM2 was the first OTF for all exposure (flash and ambient) and they added spot in the OM2S and OM4. OM3 too but it has no auto exposure mode. You can check it out at http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography/hardwares/classics/olympusom1n2/om2/htmls/index2.htm
The LX uses a single metering cel as opposed to the Oly as well as the aforementioned long exposure difference and metering range in favor of the LX. One of the other advantages of most Pentax over these OM's is that the aperture is also shown on the viewfinder. None of the OM's (1, 2, 3 & 4) show the aperture in the viewfinder. Only the OM1 has on demand MLU. OM2 & 4 are much more battery dependent as most all other autoexposure capable cameras.
04-20-2012, 12:40 PM   #30
Pentaxian
TaoMaas's Avatar

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Oklahoma City
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 3,146
QuoteOriginally posted by TomB_tx Quote
At the time the LX was introduced it was to be a "pro" camera, and back then "pros" would never admit to using auto exposure anyway...
You almost couldn't use auto back then for many subjects because, if you were shooting for publication, nobody accepted anything but slides...and slides were a bit trickier to expose right. I could be wrong, but I've always felt like the preference for the LX or the Super Program boiled down to: "Are you primarily a manual shooter who sometimes shoots in auto? Or do you mostly shoot in auto, but want the ability to switch to manual when needed?"
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
bodies, brightness, chris, color, density, exposure, exposures, film, filters, finder, focus, fun, light, lx, mirror, nikkor, pentax, portra, post, program, results, shots, sp, test, time, viewfinder
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 09:52 AM. | See also: NikonForums.com, part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top