Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
08-27-2012, 01:32 PM   #1
New Member




Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 5
Ilford XP2 problems?

Hi,

I'm new to film photography and I've just acquired a supposedly all functional K1000 on eBay. I've just recieved my scanned photos from the lab, but there are a lot of them that are completely washed out, all grey. A few ones have a really good contrast, with deep blacks while other ones have washed out grey-blacks. I'm thinking it is exposure problems, but, as I'm new to this, I thought overexposure or underexposure would cause the pictures to be too black or too grey or too white, but not as washed out grey as this...

I've attached a few photos, so maybe you could explain to me what I did wrong.

Thanks!

Attached Images
             
08-27-2012, 01:40 PM   #2
Veteran Member
Nesster's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: NJ USA
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 13,047
Underexposure on the first two, and the other greyish ones, though less so. Except for the first two, you can recover much in post processing
08-27-2012, 02:07 PM   #3
Veteran Member
womble's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Hertfordshire
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 1,325
Given the very high exposure latitude of XP2 I'm surprised those first two are as underexposed as they are. Do you have a light meter you can check your camera's one against?

K.
08-27-2012, 03:04 PM   #4
New Member




Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 5
Original Poster
Hi,

I have just recieved a Gossen Lunasix, but at the time I had no external light meter. So as I understand, if I underexpose, I won't have a black picture, but a complete gray one? I'm suprised, I thought I was going to have a black picture if I underexposed, not a gray one. And if I overexpose, will I get the same result of washed out gray?

Thanks

08-27-2012, 04:51 PM   #5
Site Supporter
zplus's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Kansas City, Missouri
Posts: 168
The k1000's meter needle will go to the middle if there is not enough light to activate it. This can cause you to think you have adequate exposure when it is really way under.
08-27-2012, 05:08 PM   #6
Veteran Member
Nesster's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: NJ USA
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 13,047
QuoteOriginally posted by etibo1 Quote
if I underexpose, I won't have a black picture, but a complete gray one? I'm suprised, I thought I was going to have a black picture if I underexposed, not a gray one
Think of it this way: the auto exposure on the scanner will try to see everything as an average scene. So if it is a thin negative, it will scan grey.
08-27-2012, 05:23 PM   #7
Site Supporter
zplus's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Kansas City, Missouri
Posts: 168
QuoteOriginally posted by Nesster Quote
Think of it this way: the auto exposure on the scanner will try to see everything as an average scene. So if it is a thin negative, it will scan grey.
Bingo.

Also, regarding the other photos, either whoever developed them let them Dev too long (or too hot) or scanned them with too much contrast. The second to last photo looks like the camera got tricked by the back light from outside. In that situation I would have pointed the camera down at the floor, metered, then reframed and shot.
08-27-2012, 06:10 PM   #8
Senior Member
Simian Summit's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Hamilton
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 146
Another thing that you may want to watch out for is backlighting. It appears that your 5th, 6th, and 7th shots are taken under some tricky lighting situations. When you shoot in particularly backlight conditions the cameras light meter may meter to the highlight area instead of your subject (or somewhere in-between your subject and the highlight area depending on how much of the image both of them are respectively). So when you're metering you may want to keep this in mind. As a rule of thumb, you may want to keep in mind the Sunny 16 rule (Ultimate Exposure Computer) and ask yourself before shooting whether your exposure settings make sense. As far as the image of the man in the kitchen, I'm not sure what to suggest in this case. I've always had issues judging artificial light, although if you don't want to blow out the background or underexpose your subject you may want to consider using fill flash (Strobist: Lighting 101: Balancing Flash and Ambient, Pt 1). As for your second shot of the clothes on the line, I don't know what you can do with this. I suspect that we are looking at various coloured clothes that the the film is picking up dark and light alternatively. I don't know what you can do here, but I suspect you have two options. The first is using the zone system (well the modified zone system...A simplified zone system for making good exposures) to shoot it to try to pick up both the highlights and shadows. Your other option is to use B&W contrast filters to try to push all of the clothes to a subtle shift in grey (Filters in Black and White Photography), this may balance the harsh contrast that you're seeing (although I have no real experience doing this successfully, so it may not). Anyway, there's lots to learn, and the best way is to shoot lots and see what works well and what doesn't.

Have fun and best of luck

08-28-2012, 01:22 AM   #9
Veteran Member
womble's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Hertfordshire
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 1,325
Lots of good advice here but I would double check your camera's meter first. Find something of a uniform colour and illumination (a big grass field works well). Take a reading with the K1000 and then compare it to a reading from your new handheld meter. They are unlikely to be exactly the same but they should be pretty close. K.
08-28-2012, 01:00 PM   #10
New Member




Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 5
Original Poster
Hi,

so it may be the scanner, the dev or me (who exposed badly, which is more likely). I'll try to get my negatives developed in another place, I'll scan them myself and I'll read what you posted, Simian. I bought 2 Kodak C41, in order to compare to the XP2, and with my Lunasix meter, I have anyway a lot of testing to do out there!

Thanks a lot for the advices!

etibo1
08-31-2012, 08:24 PM   #11
Veteran Member
PPPPPP42's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Wisconsin
Photos: Albums
Posts: 847
I hate the auto features on scanners (which is anything you don't do yourself), always makes a mess of anything that isn't nearly perfectly exposed. Very entertaining results can be had depending on the brand of the mini lab they use from funny color tints to what you got. May want to consider getting your own film scanner if you are going to stick with lab developed chromogenic stuff, thatll give you more control, many threads on that in the film forum.

Having used my K1000 a lot myself I can see in all those pictures what parts fooled the light meter, technically everything but the first two (which just baffle me) are exposed correctly for the brighter areas, you just don't have the exposure latitude to cover the whole range so its better to expose for the shadows more, which is what you should be doing anyways since with film (unlike digital) the highlights compress and you almost have to deliberately get them to blow out. With the K1000 if I have too wide a range in a scene I usually adjust so when pointed at just the darkest parts (or something of equivalent brightness) the needle is at the bottom of the range (I think that equals one stop under) in the viewfinder but still inside the range, usually possible to recover stuff from there.

Its funny to watch the meter as you pan around on a K1000, in that one pic the tiny bit of white lawn chair sticking into the frame was probably worth 1 stop all by itself. Think of it like shining a flashlight at the camera, just blinds the big center weight meter.
08-31-2012, 09:19 PM   #12
Site Supporter




Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Gabriola Island
Posts: 591
QuoteOriginally posted by etibo1 Quote
Hi,

I'm new to film photography and I've just acquired a supposedly all functional K1000 on eBay. I've just recieved my scanned photos from the lab, but there are a lot of them that are completely washed out, all grey. A few ones have a really good contrast, with deep blacks while other ones have washed out grey-blacks. I'm thinking it is exposure problems, but, as I'm new to this, I thought overexposure or underexposure would cause the pictures to be too black or too grey or too white, but not as washed out grey as this...

I've attached a few photos, so maybe you could explain to me what I did wrong.

Thanks!
The problems are a combination of underexposure and lousy scanning. It is unlikely that too long in the developer, or too hot, was a problem because XP2 is C41 process, which is usually done by machines.

Your plans to check meters and do your own scanning make sense.

Remember that XP2 has a lot of exposure latitude, and tolerates overexposure very well, so when in doubt give it more exposure.

Enjoy!
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
ilford xp2, photos
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
So if I were to pick one brand, Ilford? PPPPPP42 Film Processing, Scanning, and Darkroom 8 06-04-2012 11:47 PM
Ilford Pan F Plus 50 phonoline Film Processing, Scanning, and Darkroom 2 10-04-2011 11:15 AM
Getting the best from Ilford XP2 400? Jetsam1 Pentax Film SLR Discussion 10 12-17-2010 04:36 PM
Ilford XP2 tips sardah2626 Pentax Film SLR Discussion 18 11-28-2010 09:34 AM
Ilford XP2 thread lbenac Pentax Film SLR Discussion 12 06-24-2009 07:13 AM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 12:27 PM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top