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09-21-2012, 09:37 PM   #1
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First time shooting velvia with KS500

Hello -

Just got my velvia 50 and 100 in the mail today, going to be shooting with my Pentax (Sears) KS500 and need some help with exposing.

My KS500 has the following settings on the right dial:

B | 8 | 15 | 30 | 60 |125|250 |500

And on the left dial where it says ASA:

12-3200, then DIN:

12-36...

im confused!

Since it's velvia 50.. do I pick ISO 50?

How does this correspond with my aperture on lens? 2 | 2.8 | 4 | 5.6 | 8 | 11 |16??

I'm a total newb, but any help is much appreciated.

How does my light meter play a part in this? When it's in it's perfect exposure part (when needle is in middle) does that mean my picture is going to be bright or dim? Any help how my settings affect this?

thanks.

09-21-2012, 09:48 PM   #2
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Set your ASA Dial to 50.
ASA and ISO are sorta different names for the same thing.
09-21-2012, 09:51 PM   #3
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Thank you.

What if I set it to 40 or 30? How will this affect the output?
09-21-2012, 10:54 PM   #4
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By setting the ASA dial higher or lower than the film's rated speed, you're sort of fooling the meter.
If you set to say 30, the meter thinks you have 30 speed film, so it will give an exposure reading that will overexpose 50 speed film.

I highly recommend finding a copy of Understanding Exposure, it is well worth it.

09-22-2012, 12:46 AM   #5
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QuoteOriginally posted by anbuzim Quote
Hello -

I'm a total newb, but any help is much appreciated.

How does my light meter play a part in this? When it's in it's perfect exposure part (when needle is in middle) does that mean my picture is going to be bright or dim? Any help how my settings affect this?

thanks.
Normally you need the needle in the middle for the correct exposure but there are times when you the photographer has to decide to deviate from this because you have better information about the lighting than the camera's light meter. The classic example is when there is strong light coming from behind the subject. If you leave the needle in the middle in this case then the subject will be very dark so you have to make sure the needle is higher so that the subject is correctly exposed at the expense of the background which will be overexposed.

As Colton said, you perhaps need to read up on "exposure". There are some good books and also many online guides. You will also need to understand the relationship between aperture and "depth of field" i.e. how much of your shot is in focus. You will also need to know about shutter speeds and how your shots may come out blurry if the shutter speed is too slow. This all sounds very technical but 30 minutes of reading will give you all you need to know to get started. Good luck with the Velvia 50. Make sure you have good light when shooting that. You won't be able to use that indoors without a flash.

Check this link:- Camera Exposure: Aperture, ISO & Shutter Speed
09-22-2012, 01:43 PM   #6
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Don't let your first film be a Velvia. The results will inevitably suck. Get a cheap drug store film first (or 10), to learn the basics of the camera.
09-22-2012, 02:44 PM   #7
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Lets say it's a bright summers day, very bright. The grass is perfectly lit. My dog is on the grass, facing the sun.. there's not a glare on her face though. I should set my aperture to F11 and shoot at 125speed with a 50iso.. this will give me a perfectly exposed pic, no?
09-22-2012, 02:49 PM   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by kcobain1992 Quote
Don't let your first film be a Velvia. The results will inevitably suck. Get a cheap drug store film first (or 10), to learn the basics of the camera.
Seriously, you'll thank me later.

09-22-2012, 02:55 PM   #9
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yes i heard you the first time. i am asking about velvia though, not other films. i have shot with those films and know how to shoot. i am asking about velvia since it's sensitive.
09-22-2012, 03:57 PM   #10
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QuoteOriginally posted by anbuzim Quote
Lets say it's a bright summers day, very bright. The grass is perfectly lit. My dog is on the grass, facing the sun.. there's not a glare on her face though. I should set my aperture to F11 and shoot at 125speed with a 50iso.. this will give me a perfectly exposed pic, no?
I would tend to use f/8 or f/9.5 and 1/125 with Velvia in that situation.

I've found (where I live) that while "sunny 16" gives nice rich deeply saturated blue skies, everything else ends up under exposed so I use "sunny 11" instead.

Velvia RVP @ Sunny 11




Velvia RVP @ Sunny 16
09-22-2012, 04:15 PM   #11
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QuoteOriginally posted by anbuzim Quote
How does this correspond with my aperture on lens? 2 | 2.8 | 4 | 5.6 | 8 | 11 |16??
QuoteOriginally posted by anbuzim Quote
How does my light meter play a part in this? When it's in it's perfect exposure part (when needle is in middle) does that mean my picture is going to be bright or dim? Any help how my settings affect this?
QuoteOriginally posted by anbuzim Quote
i have shot with those films and know how to shoot.
If you're asking about how aperture works and how the light meter works, then clearly you don't know how exposure works. Listen to KCobain and don't use velvia until you know how the principles of exposure. Read up on it first.
09-23-2012, 07:11 PM   #12
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QuoteOriginally posted by kcobain1992 Quote
Don't let your first film be a Velvia. The results will inevitably suck. Get a cheap drug store film first (or 10), to learn the basics of the camera.

What he said. I would also normally suggest reading the manual for the camera, but since I can't find an online copy, I guess that is not something easily done. It is similar to the XR-1, so that manual might be helpful (LINK)

While reading a good beginner's guide to film photography is a good idea (your local library would be a great place to start), the basics are pretty simple:
  • Load batteries
  • Load film
  • Set ASA (same numbers as ISO) to match the number on the film box
  • Frame your subject
  • Adjust meter so that the two needles in the viewfinder line up
  • Focus
  • Expose



Steve


P.S. I believe that the film wind lever on your camera doubles as the meter switch. Off is flush with the body. On is with the lever away from the body.
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