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02-12-2008, 07:19 PM   #1
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Film Photography Generally

I still love using film. I'm not adverse to using digital cameras, I just prefer using film. It does sadden me a bit to learn that some of the professionals, either by choice or by design, have been solely using digital media.

Should I be this sad or should I be optimistic that film will be around for awhile?

Margaret

02-12-2008, 07:27 PM   #2
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Maybe the amateurs will keep film alive.
There are of course different kinds of professionals, I like to think that real art is still made with a film camera.
02-12-2008, 07:32 PM   #3
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QuoteOriginally posted by Barbecueboy Quote
Maybe the amateurs will keep film alive.
There are of course different kinds of professionals, I like to think that real art is still made with a film camera.
real art is made by the photographer, not the meduim.

or do you believe that water colors are not real art either?

There is even a group that think real art is made by photoshop, and that individual pictures are simply the new paints for the digital era.

Back to the OP's post. FIlm will remain for some time more, it is still a gppd meduim to teach the basics, and they do make some very good films today. In fact, if digital came out with its present quality 25 years ago, with film where it was then, film would have died out even faster.
02-12-2008, 08:09 PM   #4
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I'm not too worried. For b&w work, film still gives a far more "organic" feel than digital. And don't forget medium and large format. I shoot a lot of film with my Hasselblad, because I can't imagine I will be able to afford a $35,000 digital back any time soon!

A 6x6 cm (or 6x4.5, or 6x7, or 6x9) negative has far more information than the highest resolution digital sensor. It all depends on your definition of "resolution", of course...

02-13-2008, 04:56 AM   #5
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The only thing you really have to worry about for the foreseeable future is the decline of neighborhood locations that do in-store processing and perhaps a decline in the variety of films you can find locally. So long as you don't mind sending film off and waiting a few days for it to come back and are willing to mail-order your film from a large supplier over the internet, you should be just fine. There is still lots of variety of stuff out there....it just isn't in your neighborhood stores like it used to be.
02-13-2008, 12:11 PM   #6
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I pretty much agree with the above posts. Film will still be around for a while, but it may not be as convenient. I now order medium and large format film from B&H. The local camera store doesn't stock b&w in those sizes although they do carry some color. The owner is a good friend and would order it for me, but I can order it from B&H just as easily.
02-13-2008, 12:55 PM   #7
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I've been toying around with the idea of developing myself, rather than sending it out. I figure I can load film onto reels with a film changing bag, and then develop in the bathroom sink (but I can forget about a dust-free drying area ). Then I can just scan the negs like usual and I'll be good to go.
02-13-2008, 03:06 PM   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by Finn Quote
I've been toying around with the idea of developing myself, rather than sending it out. I figure I can load film onto reels with a film changing bag, and then develop in the bathroom sink (but I can forget about a dust-free drying area ). Then I can just scan the negs like usual and I'll be good to go.
The problem is that DYI emulsions and kits are fast disappearing. It is a dying art. :ugh:

02-13-2008, 04:29 PM   #9
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QuoteOriginally posted by Finn Quote
I've been toying around with the idea of developing myself, rather than sending it out. I figure I can load film onto reels with a film changing bag, and then develop in the bathroom sink (but I can forget about a dust-free drying area ). Then I can just scan the negs like usual and I'll be good to go.
They might be hard to find now, but someone used to make an inexpensive plastic bag that hung and you could dry the film inside. However, it doesn't take long for film to dry and if I can do it here in West Texas with all the dust then you can probably do anywhere.

A bathroom is a good place if you have one that can go unused while your film drys. If you are really worried about dust you can help clear the air by turning a hot shower on until it produces a little steam to settle the dust down. I rarely feed the need to do that.
02-13-2008, 04:34 PM   #10
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. . . and, I almost forgot.

There are probably as many films for large format than there ever was. In fact, I'd have to dig through "View Camera" magazine, but I think some have been introduced just recently. Also, according to "View Camera", some new film developers are now on the market.
02-13-2008, 05:45 PM   #11
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QuoteOriginally posted by Lowell Goudge Quote
real art is made by the photographer, not the meduim.
No contest. I just saw a 1983 BBC documentary about Ansel Adams, in which he is very excited about the possibilities of digital photography.
What would he be using today?
02-13-2008, 05:49 PM   #12
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QuoteOriginally posted by Barbecueboy Quote
No contest. I just saw a 1983 BBC documentary about Ansel Adams, in which he is very excited about the possibilities of digital photography.
What would he be using today?
More than we can afford, but he could get by with much less than we could afford.

What I would be interested in knowing, considering his vision (not just for photos but how to manipulate them) is what would he do with digital.

That would make a great thread all by itself
02-13-2008, 05:56 PM   #13
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QuoteOriginally posted by Lowell Goudge Quote
More than we can afford, but he could get by with much less than we could afford.

What I would be interested in knowing, considering his vision (not just for photos but how to manipulate them) is what would he do with digital.

That would make a great thread all by itself
Something tells me he'd still be shooting 8x10. It's a totally different deal. For one thing, you have tilt/shift in every lens, which is something you can't always fudge in PP. Large format is still alive and well.
02-13-2008, 06:13 PM   #14
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I don't think film will ever die, it is just a matter of how many people will carry it on. one thing film has going for it is that peolpe who are learning all over right now are still learning on the good old K1000, and for tht you need film...and you have to think that even though the digital age is upon us there will always be people who like the feel and nostalgia of film.
I myself am looking for a good KX body now because nothing else compares to that feel and sound as a good film camera.
02-14-2008, 01:49 AM   #15
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QuoteOriginally posted by Finn Quote
I've been toying around with the idea of developing myself, rather than sending it out. I figure I can load film onto reels with a film changing bag, and then develop in the bathroom sink (but I can forget about a dust-free drying area ). Then I can just scan the negs like usual and I'll be good to go.
Ah, that sounds familiar - I am also looking at the possibility. Have traced a B&W developing kit at my local photographic store but still need to find a film changing bag.

They are looking out for one for me. If they cannot get one I will get a mate to make me one. I should easily be able to do it in the bathroom as no ne uses my 2nd bathroom/laundry.

I have also uncovered an old photographic book that explains the whole process step by step.
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