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07-21-2013, 05:50 PM   #16
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I'm assuming the Epson all-in-one printer/scanner combo doesn't come with film hoders. I'm afraid I don't have experience with those, but I would suggest a better scanner for film. The reason is the dynamic range (range of colours) of a combo scanner is usually much less than even a good flatbed like an Epson Perfection. Dynamic range is very important when dealing with film since a higher dynamic range catches more colour detail. The difference between a good film-aware flatbed and one which wasn't built with film in mind is huge.
An Epson Perfection V500 or V600 can be obtained inexpensively at big box stores. You can get a real deal on refurbished (I got my V500 for less than $100) from Epson. Just search for Epson refurbushed scanners if you want to go that route.
Also, Canon makes the Canoscan 9000f that is very similar to the Epsons.
Plustek makes sub- $300 dedicated 35mm film scanners, too.

07-21-2013, 05:52 PM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by FoTom Quote
Those are really nice photos! What lovely girls [your family?], and the tunnel shot is quite compelling!

So you're using a cropped camera to scan medium format negatives?! That is amazing! Wow, I guess I was worrying too much about 35mm. Have you been able to make large prints with your scans?
I haven't tried to make any prints yet. I really have been using the K5 as just a means to get digital proofs rather than super high quality scans, but the raw files look pretty good and I have been getting better at the color correction, which is the really difficult part of the color negs. I would definitely consider that you could print 11x14's for example.

The girls are my sister-in-law and my daughter. Thanks.
07-21-2013, 06:02 PM   #18
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As I said, I've gotten better at the color correction of the slides. Also see the 100% crop, I think there is still more detail in the film if I wanted to get it, but whats there is quite good.
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07-21-2013, 06:24 PM   #19
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QuoteOriginally posted by Schmidt Quote
So they still make 35mm film cameras! A little pricey for me though, so I'll just keep looking for a Pentax in good shape.

You mention that you don't have film adaptors. What kind of scanner do you have?
Yes, you can still buy a 35mm film camera. Leica and Nikon still make them as does Cosina (sold under Nikon, Zeiss, Voigtlander, Vivitar, and several other names). To answer your questions and maybe summarize some of the above:
  • You can process your own 35mm B&W negatives easily enough using a daylight processing tank. The cost to get started including chemicals is under $50 USD.
  • If you live in or near a larger town, you may have access to a "pro" lab where you can have your processing done to order. (Yes, many pros still shoot film.) Push/Pull processing generally means an additional fee.
  • Color negative processing can also be done at home, but I have found that it is easier to simply have the pro lab do it.
  • You can pay to have your negatives scanned. Scan quality can be an issue. Again, the pro lab may be your best resource. I used to have my processing and scans done by Costco and/or Walgreens. I don't have them do either anymore.
  • You can buy a scanner and scan your own negatives. The entry ticket for minimal quality is in the low $200 USD range. Scanners can be loosely grouped into flatbed units adapted for scanning film and dedicated film scanners. For 35mm, the dedicated units usually provide somewhat better results. Be aware that real world scanner resolution is usually much less than the number on the box. Should you choose to do you own scans, time spent in product research is well worth the effort. I do my own scans and would not have it any other way, but getting there was expensive.
This site is a good and friendly resource. You might also want to check out your local community college. They usually provide courses introductory photography and film processing is usually included.


Steve

(...has Nikon Coolscan 5000 ED for 35mm and Epson V700 for medium and large format...)

07-21-2013, 07:38 PM   #20
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QuoteOriginally posted by stevebrot Quote
Yes, you can still buy a 35mm film camera. Leica and Nikon still make them as does Cosina (sold under Nikon, Zeiss, Voigtlander, Vivitar, and several other names). To answer your questions and maybe summarize some of the above:
  • You can process your own 35mm B&W negatives easily enough using a daylight processing tank. The cost to get started including chemicals is under $50 USD.
  • If you live in or near a larger town, you may have access to a "pro" lab where you can have your processing done to order. (Yes, many pros still shoot film.) Push/Pull processing generally means an additional fee.
  • Color negative processing can also be done at home, but I have found that it is easier to simply have the pro lab do it.
  • You can pay to have your negatives scanned. Scan quality can be an issue. Again, the pro lab may be your best resource. I used to have my processing and scans done by Costco and/or Walgreens. I don't have them do either anymore.
  • You can buy a scanner and scan your own negatives. The entry ticket for minimal quality is in the low $200 USD range. Scanners can be loosely grouped into flatbed units adapted for scanning film and dedicated film scanners. For 35mm, the dedicated units usually provide somewhat better results. Be aware that real world scanner resolution is usually much less than the number on the box. Should you choose to do you own scans, time spent in product research is well worth the effort. I do my own scans and would not have it any other way, but getting there was expensive.
This site is a good and friendly resource. You might also want to check out your local community college. They usually provide courses introductory photography and film processing is usually included.


Steve

(...has Nikon Coolscan 5000 ED for 35mm and Epson V700 for medium and large format...)
Our experiences might not apply to the OP, he is in Mexico. Any electronic equipment will be much more expensive. The chemicals might actually be easier to get there... Do they have community colleges in Mexico?
07-21-2013, 09:03 PM   #21
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QuoteOriginally posted by Gareth.Ig Quote
As I said, I've gotten better at the color correction of the slides. Also see the 100% crop, I think there is still more detail in the film if I wanted to get it, but whats there is quite good.

I've also been planning on getting into film soon; I recently purchased an Epson 4990 Pro and a Canon 8800F for under $10 each at yard sales; and I've been thoroughly impressed by the few frames I scanned on the Canon (I would try the Epson, but mine only came with the medium format and 4x5 film holders, not the 35mm). Both of these are older flatbeds with back-illumination panels, but they still produce better results than a modern cheap dedicated scanner. You could probably find a scanner of this type on craigslist for under $50 with a set of film holders; it seems like a lot of people are selling them.

Last edited by KristoffL; 07-23-2013 at 06:16 AM.
07-21-2013, 09:39 PM   #22
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But why buy a Canon or Nikon film camera? Buy a used Pentax, and maybe you can use some of your lenses. Most of the primes over 35mm are film friendly.
07-21-2013, 10:50 PM   #23
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Schmidt: nope, no film holders for my scanner. I'll check the ones you mention, or like

Gareth: I think you're getting there on the colour correction part, this photo in particular is quite pleasing. Beautiful family too!
With that quality I would definitely be able to print quite large.. but you do have a medium format Hasselblad hehehe. I'll be shooting right now with a 35mm Vivitar ^__^

Stevebrot: Thank you for such a rich answer. I'd like to try processing my own negatives just for the fun and challenge it is for me. The price you mention is perfectly acceptable, so I will definitely try it. Will it be the only way for me? Most likely not, because like you, I think I'll have some lab do that for me, and I'll "finish" processing the negatives digitally.

To digitize them, that's another story, and I'm still torn between having them do it too and getting a scanner myself because of the price of equipment vs their scan quality. Regarding the photography course, I'll pass on that; it will be a waste of time and money because [at the risk of sounding like a total jerk] all I could learn from an introductory course would be film processing, and I think I can learn that myself with books and online resources. I've checked the course contents and all, and I was tempted to join that photography school, but I no longer live in that city, plus looking back, it would have been just like I said.. Right now work is what restricts my time I dedicate to photography, but it's also enabling me to it. I'm basically funding myself my way to photography, or rather the gear, actually.


Boriscleto: The electronic equipment here is much more expensive indeed, not a problem since I can purchase things online ^__^
We do have community colleges, it wouldn't hurt to investigate.


KristoffL: Thanks! I'll look for those models too =]


maxfield_photo: Some people [myself included] have more than one camera system, they're just good alternatives to a used Pentax or a new Leica or, like the one I just purchased, a new Vivitar ^__^ Even if Pentax cameras are VERY good, they do have an expiration date on their shutters [ok, expiration shutter actuations, but that sounds silly]. Unless it's a used but rebuilt or minty [aka expensive] camera, I'd better buy a new one. Which is what I did, but others may prefer an older camera just for the vintageness of that =P

07-21-2013, 11:38 PM   #24
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When I shoot film, I use North Coast Photo in Carlsbad, California to develop the film, then make me a contact print and a CD with enhanced hi-res scans at 3339 x 5035 pixels. From there I'm off to the races on my PC for photo editing... I use Xara Photo & Graphic Designer, and Oloneo Photoengine.

North Coast Photographic Services

Film is slower... you don't get instant digital gratification... but the old cameras sure feel good to use, don't they? And they are incredibly cheap... I bought a WONDERFUL Pentax 645N for about $200... love that camera. All-time ergonomics winner, beautiful sharp color!

Last edited by jon404; 07-21-2013 at 11:47 PM.
07-22-2013, 12:01 AM - 1 Like   #25
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Like few others here, I just got back to film shooting around 4 months ago (after 10 year hiatus). Just recently acquired a hasselblad at bargain price (take that FF and took it with me to Nepal along with my Pentax MX and LX. I've found myself using the hassy and MX the most. So the LX will soon go to new home. Also just acquired a Rollei 35se as my compact camera, as you can see shooting film is addictive. During all this time my K5 has been seating at the bottom of my camera bag (it only saw daylight for one day in Nepal). Anyway, here's my experiences.

B&W development is easy! Get a light tank, change bag and few chemicals. It's cheap and I love the look of B&W on film. I've never liked it on digital, I'm not sure why, but they have very different look. I use Rodinal and Xtol when I want more sharp negatives.

I also got a colour dev kit, but I've not used it yet. It's bit more tricky since you have to keep the temps stable at 38C.

I love the way film looks, especially when it's overexposed.

I've tried scanning with a camera, it's too fiddly and slow for me. Too prone to dust and when scanning 6 rolls of 135 film and 30 rolls of 120, it's time consuming. Not to mention the need to do panoramas on every single photo etc. Also I find the DR in shadow and highlights not that great with my K5. So, I've acquired Epson V700, I can scan 24 x 35mm in one go or 6 frames of 6x6 120 roll. Much faster workflow, no need for stitching, maybe resolution isn't there, but the B&W tones are better and I'm having much easier time getting colours right with the scanner. The scans for 35mm are around 6MP equivalent and for 6x6 are 24MP. That's plenty for me. I don't need any more pixels than that.

Here's some photos from the hasselblad (I've not uploaded any of the ones taken by MX):
















To see what others (aka better photographers) achieve with film, you can check my favourites on flickr.
07-22-2013, 12:46 AM   #26
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QuoteOriginally posted by jon404 Quote
When I shoot film, I use North Coast Photo in Carlsbad, California to develop the film, then make me a contact print and a CD with enhanced hi-res scans at 3339 x 5035 pixels. From there I'm off to the races on my PC for photo editing... I use Xara Photo & Graphic Designer, and Oloneo Photoengine.

North Coast Photographic Services

Film is slower... you don't get instant digital gratification... but the old cameras sure feel good to use, don't they? And they are incredibly cheap... I bought a WONDERFUL Pentax 645N for about $200... love that camera. All-time ergonomics winner, beautiful sharp color!
I hope I can find a similar service where I am, but I seriously doubt it. Cool programs, at least Xara.. Oloneo I've never heard of before. I use Lightroom though.

And yup, film is a whole different story =D
07-22-2013, 12:49 AM   #27
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QuoteOriginally posted by Nuff Quote
Like few others here, I just got back to film shooting around 4 months ago (after 10 year hiatus). Just recently acquired a hasselblad at bargain price (take that FF and took it with me to Nepal along with my Pentax MX and LX. I've found myself using the hassy and MX the most. So the LX will soon go to new home. Also just acquired a Rollei 35se as my compact camera, as you can see shooting film is addictive. During all this time my K5 has been seating at the bottom of my camera bag (it only saw daylight for one day in Nepal). Anyway, here's my experiences.

B&W development is easy! Get a light tank, change bag and few chemicals. It's cheap and I love the look of B&W on film. I've never liked it on digital, I'm not sure why, but they have very different look. I use Rodinal and Xtol when I want more sharp negatives.

I also got a colour dev kit, but I've not used it yet. It's bit more tricky since you have to keep the temps stable at 38C.

I love the way film looks, especially when it's overexposed.

I've tried scanning with a camera, it's too fiddly and slow for me. Too prone to dust and when scanning 6 rolls of 135 film and 30 rolls of 120, it's time consuming. Not to mention the need to do panoramas on every single photo etc. Also I find the DR in shadow and highlights not that great with my K5. So, I've acquired Epson V700, I can scan 24 x 35mm in one go or 6 frames of 6x6 120 roll. Much faster workflow, no need for stitching, maybe resolution isn't there, but the B&W tones are better and I'm having much easier time getting colours right with the scanner. The scans for 35mm are around 6MP equivalent and for 6x6 are 24MP. That's plenty for me. I don't need any more pixels than that.

Here's some photos from the hasselblad (I've not uploaded any of the ones taken by MX):

To see what others (aka better photographers) achieve with film, you can check my favourites on flickr.

I will work on developing my own B&W negatives =]

WOW. No, no no, that's cheating! What images, they are stunning. The last one, that's amazing! And the girl's portrait and its.. almost ethereal look. And the colours on the first photo, I'm in awe.

Last edited by FoTom; 07-22-2013 at 01:01 AM.
07-22-2013, 02:53 AM   #28
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QuoteOriginally posted by FoTom Quote
Now I just bought an inexpensive Vivitar film SLR, a K1000 clone [K mount of course] and I want to start/return to shooting film, not exclusively, but more like as another tool in my bag [figuratively speaking]. Also because it's my cheap alternative to full frame
Its not a cheap alternative to full frame....... it IS full frame.
07-22-2013, 06:48 AM   #29
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I am like 6 months ahead of you, same story on dig vs film.

Get a cheaper epson flatbed with the film holder and some betterscanning.com inserts. This is as good as it gets until you spend $2000 or something crazy. My opinion, of course.

Scan at 2400 using the baked in epson software, works great. You can easily print 8x10 off that.

I learned how to do b&w and c41 color at home it's super easy, shockingly so. You don't need a darkroom, just a changing bag.

I have more time than money so this works for me. I am down to like ~1$ per color roll and less than 50 cents on the b&w. the scanning takes like 2 hours for 38 shots but I am only actively doing it long enough to load the new film in and then walk away.

Shipping out my rolls and having them scanned with shipping etc was crazy expensive for any volume of shooting.

Have fun! I know that my photography has improved 100% since I started film. I am mostly shooting family life shots so having the physical backups ( no hard drive for negatives!) is worth a lot to me.

I shot lots of film and standardized on portra 400 and tri-x 400.

Good luck!
07-22-2013, 07:12 AM   #30
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Oh and one thing I forgot to mention if you have the lab scan your negs you will get them back fully processed with curves applied, colors and contrast tweaked... This can be good or bad depending on what you want.
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