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07-23-2013, 07:31 PM   #46
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I always processed by the numbers in B&W but I started backwards doing ceiba chrome and then doing B&W later so inwas used to do by the numbers, but it was still fun to see the image come out in the tray

07-23-2013, 07:50 PM   #47
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QuoteOriginally posted by Gareth.Ig Quote
Actually, its a Bronica GS-1. Dirt cheap, body plus 65mm lens was $190 and I just picked up a 50mm WA and 110mm macro for $300.

I have been thinking about the Pentax 645, but I've got enough money sunk into cameras for this year.
Ah, since someone else said Hasselblad I assumed they were right.

Well, to be honest, any camera that's not a point-and-shoot is a money pit haha at least for people like us, I think. Oh and I thought being a musician was an expensive art..
07-23-2013, 07:52 PM   #48
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QuoteOriginally posted by Lowell Goudge Quote
Welcome to the insanity of film. My last rolls were B&W which is what I assume you are going to shoot. The lab I use charges $5 extra to push 3 stops. They scanned each roll of 36 for an additional $7 and put them on a photo CD. They did 12 bit tiff files at 5 MP.

I did this because I was lazy. I can scan them at 10MP myself but it takes time with my old scanner. I could also, with minimal effort develop them because B&W is easy. The only dark you need is to load the film to the reel, and put it into the developing tank, the rest is all done in normal light. A bathroom with cover over the window and a sealed door can do just fine.

Wen you consider a 3stop push takes 30 minutes in developer alone (D76 processor solution) over normal exposure, to pay $5 for push process is reasonable. Since you are looking to scan there is no magic moment as images appear in the print tray so I think unless you are really pushed for cash, your time may be worth more unless you process a lo of film
Hehe yes, the more I read, the more I'm intrigued by learning the process, but just for the sake of it, and the more convinced I am that a lab will have to do it for me

My film camera is still in the post office =[ work hours suck..
07-23-2013, 09:16 PM   #49
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I say try the lab so you have a baseline for comparison, but then try a roll or two yourself. For me, it's faster, cheaper, and I get better results, plus I feel like I am in control of the process. I don't have to worry about when was the last time the lab changed their chemistry? Are they running enough though it every day to keep it balance? I'm the only one to blame when things go wrong, but I also get to take all the credit when they go right.

Here is a great overview of the B&W process, it really is this easy.



07-23-2013, 10:47 PM   #50
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QuoteOriginally posted by FoTom Quote
Ah, since someone else said Hasselblad I assumed they were right.
Sorry about that; i saw the notches in the corners and assumed it was a Hasselblad, since they're known for having them
07-24-2013, 08:43 AM   #51
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QuoteOriginally posted by maxfield_photo Quote
Here is a great overview of the B&W process, it really is this easy.
Yes it really is that easy. I think the only part that takes practice is loading the developing reel solely by touch. Then it's swirl, swirl, bump, wait, repeat. Almost makes me wish I hadn't sold my entire darkroom a couple years ago.
07-26-2013, 12:30 AM   #52
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QuoteOriginally posted by maxfield_photo Quote
I say try the lab so you have a baseline for comparison, but then try a roll or two yourself. For me, it's faster, cheaper, and I get better results, plus I feel like I am in control of the process. I don't have to worry about when was the last time the lab changed their chemistry? Are they running enough though it every day to keep it balance? I'm the only one to blame when things go wrong, but I also get to take all the credit when they go right.

Here is a great overview of the B&W process, it really is this easy.

Episode 23 :: Developing Film - YouTube
Well that looks easy. I have to try it!


My new camera.. is finally here :applause.mp3: ..all I could get right now was Fuji ISO 400 colour film [actually my father did] so I'll be learning how to use this camera and hopefully get some prints that I can share soon!! =D At least for now I think I'll have to scan/photograph the prints, while I get a proper neg scanner.

I have to say, it is an insanely cool camera!!
07-26-2013, 12:30 AM   #53
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QuoteOriginally posted by KristoffL Quote
Sorry about that; i saw the notches in the corners and assumed it was a Hasselblad, since they're known for having them
Aah, today I learned..

07-27-2013, 10:54 PM   #54
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So.. the light meter does not work properly. It lights up, but it will almost always say that the photo will be underexposed, except if I set it to 1 second of exposure, then it will say it's going to be overexposed. Math, here I come..
07-28-2013, 01:00 AM   #55
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Get an incandescent light meter and your photos will improve. Film and digital alike.
07-28-2013, 05:03 AM   #56
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QuoteOriginally posted by Nuff Quote
Get an incandescent light meter and your photos will improve. Film and digital alike.
Spell check gone crazy?

The 3 most common light meters for taking photographs-

For reading continuous light levels:
reflective (type built into the camera body), you read the light that is reflected off the subject from the camera position
incident, you read the light striking the subject that will be reflected toward the camera - typically metered at the subject's location .... most accurate, but it is sometimes hard to get that close to the subject

For reading non-continuous light levels (flash):
flash, typically used like an incident light meter, but the meter displays the highest light level observed while the meter is activated.
07-28-2013, 06:14 AM   #57
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More like combination of spell check and my spelling
08-02-2013, 06:16 PM   #58
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I just had the first roll of film developed at the lab. The prints were... better than I expected [because I thought they would all come out bad] but surprisingly they all were well exposed. Not perfectly, but pretty good. I played with double exposures and they didn't come out well, the second exposure can be barely seen; I didn't expose properly for the second ones.

I want to share some of the photos, even though they are nothing to brag about, just.. well, they're mine and I had lots of fun taking them, even if they are all just test shots of this and that around the house and my street hehe. The thing is I still don't have a film scanner, so I'm going to improvise one
.

Will post results when I find a good camera/lens/cup/lighting combo, from my available toys equipment =]
I will experiment.
08-02-2013, 06:37 PM   #59
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I bought an Epson V500 Photo flatbed scanner and use that to scan B&W negs. I spent around $150 on gear to develop my own film (including chemicals that I get locally), and I'm having a good time with it. After a while the gear will pay for itself vs. sending it out (if you want to justify it). I bought stuff from B&H, Adorama, Amazon and found some used items at my local camera shop super cheap. I too Googled develop film at home and found plenty of information. I have a lightproof bag for transferring the film to the spools and do the developing at my kitchen sink. There are plenty of videos on how to do it. I just discovered two iPhone apps for timing the film developing process, one is free and the other is $8.99. I'm getting a new phone this week and will get the free app to see how that works out before I pop for the other. If you want the exact details on what gear I bought I'd be happy to help, just shoot me an email.
08-02-2013, 06:47 PM   #60
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QuoteOriginally posted by FoTom Quote
I still don't have a film scanner
But as I recall, you DO have a flatbed scanner? And you just got what you think are good PRINTS ..... Isn't that a bit easier than whacking up coffee cups or other make-do methods?
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