Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
02-15-2014, 01:20 PM   #16
Veteran Member
fretlessdavis's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Benson, AZ
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 496
QuoteOriginally posted by tuco Quote
You can get yellow-green portrait filters (but not common). Pentax made a YG bayonet filter for their 6x7 line of cameras years ago ( and I have one). Good for both men and women. It darks reds just enough without being too gothic black ( which a green can do on some reds) and yet still good for skin.

Here is an example of the Pentax YG filter in action and how it renders the tone of red.







YG Filter, 400TMY




That's a great look!

Now I'm bummed I got rid of my Hoya X0-- not sure how it compares to the Pentax, but should've been similar. I used my orange and green so much I never thought I would need the YG.

02-15-2014, 02:13 PM   #17
Senior Member




Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Los Angeles
Photos: Albums
Posts: 167
QuoteOriginally posted by FrankC Quote
Illford XP2 - A B&W film that is developed just like color film. I'd use it only if I needed the film back fast, like yesterday. Otherwise, stick with traditional B&W films.
I love this film. AND I think it's great for portraits. Why the hate?

QuoteOriginally posted by cali92rs Quote
Awesome advice all

I think I will start developing my own negatives. I just got a roll of 36 back the other day. That and 3x5 prints were $20+ Yikes
Sounds like you paid a bit too much. I pay $10 to process and scan (no prints) at Pro Photo in Irvine, CA. They do mail in/FTP delivery as well.
02-15-2014, 02:36 PM   #18
Veteran Member
FrankC's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2011
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 318
QuoteOriginally posted by fretlessdavis Quote
That's a great look!

Now I'm bummed I got rid of my Hoya X0-- not sure how it compares to the Pentax, but should've been similar. I used my orange and green so much I never thought I would need the YG.


Don't feel bad at all - any tone changes created by a colored filter can very easily be duplicated, and much better controlled, in Lightroom. IMHO you'd be better off buying Lighroom5 since you have such high control over the intensity of the tonal change, where as a filter is either on or off.
02-15-2014, 03:09 PM   #19
Pentaxian




Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Seattle
Posts: 7,103
QuoteOriginally posted by FrankC Quote
any tone changes created by a colored filter can very easily be duplicated,
Hum, I wouldn't say easy. Changing the tone of, say, a middle gray to a darker tone effects the whole image unless you are masking off sections of the image and doing it selectively. That can be a total PITA depending on the fine detail and frequency of the the tone.

Changing it by filter only affects that color and not all the other tones that are very similar, no?

02-15-2014, 03:10 PM   #20
Veteran Member
fretlessdavis's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Benson, AZ
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 496
QuoteOriginally posted by FrankC Quote
Don't feel bad at all - any tone changes created by a colored filter can very easily be duplicated, and much better controlled, in Lightroom. IMHO you'd be better off buying Lighroom5 since you have such high control over the intensity of the tonal change, where as a filter is either on or off.
No thanks. You're much better off getting it right first on film. Results are from the interactions of colors, through the filters, and the spectral sensitivity of the film.

When something starts off as B&W you CANNOT effectively imitate filters. There's no color left to manipulate.

Money for B&W is better spent on film, chemicals, and paper than software.
02-16-2014, 07:45 PM   #21
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
filmamigo's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Toronto
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 686
I love Kodak BW 400 CN for people pictures in black & white.

Rollei Retro 80S and Fuji Acros are both very nice too.
02-16-2014, 08:50 PM   #22
Veteran Member




Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Sydney
Posts: 671
I shoot my grainy stuff on my 35mm cameras (and not grainy too). But I really like the way Neopan 400 looks in Fuji Super Prodol, I do like the grain and sharpness I get from this combo. Pity the film is being discontinued, but I'm stocking up while I can.
This ones are fresh of the press and I didn't do any adjustments to them, I usually touch up a bit of contrast and some details here and there.
Also all of them are shot with 43mm lens, it's the lens I use on my MX 99% of the time.

Last edited by Nuff; 09-16-2014 at 10:39 PM.
02-17-2014, 11:11 AM   #23
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
stevebrot's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Vancouver (USA)
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 27,503
QuoteOriginally posted by Vendee Quote
I've just ordered some 80S. What are you using to develop it and what speed are you shooting it at?
I use HC-110 at 1+63 (dilution H) for 11 minutes shot at ISO 160 per LeDuc. He also has times/temps for other developers:

http://www.maco-photo.de/files/images/The_Rollei_RETRO_80s_AJ.pdf


Steve

---------- Post added 02-17-14 at 10:12 AM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by clicksworth Quote
As Ansel Adams says about photographing men - "The use of a greenish filter (#11 or #13) will tend to give more vigorous flesh tones, most noticeable in the lips and ruddy or sunburned skin".
Wonderful...that combination would make me look 1,000 years old.


Steve

---------- Post added 02-17-14 at 10:13 AM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by FrankC Quote
Don't feel bad at all - any tone changes created by a colored filter can very easily be duplicated, and much better controlled, in Lightroom.
????

Only if you shoot in color and convert to B&W.


Steve

02-17-2014, 03:27 PM   #24
Veteran Member




Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Sydney
Posts: 671
QuoteOriginally posted by stevebrot Quote
I use HC-110 at 1+63 (dilution H) for 11 minutes shot at ISO 160 per LeDuc. He also has times/temps for other developers:



http://www.maco-photo.de/files/images/The_Rollei_RETRO_80s_AJ.pdf





Steve

---------- Post added 02-17-14 at 10:12 AM ----------





Wonderful...that combination would make me look 1,000 years old.





Steve

---------- Post added 02-17-14 at 10:13 AM ----------





????



Only if you shoot in color and convert to B&W.





Steve

And they don't work the same way anyway. Can I block certain light spectrums in LR? No I can't, I can only manipulate colour channels. I guess the person above doesn't know what colour filters do. It's not the same as lowering green, blue, red channels.
02-17-2014, 07:01 PM   #25
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
stevebrot's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Vancouver (USA)
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 27,503
QuoteOriginally posted by Nuff Quote
Can I block certain light spectrums in LR? No I can't, I can only manipulate colour channels
You can do the practical equivalent and that is what I think you are saying. I use a "B&W film" toolkit of LR presets for monochrome conversion that has filter emulation based on the relative color mix on the base image. The red filter emulation has the following mix that approximates the absorption characteristics of the real thing.
  • Red +36
  • Orange +26
  • Yellow +7
  • Green -29
  • Aqua -31
  • Blue - 17
  • Purple +19
  • Magenta +52
Of course you have to start with a full color image such as that from a dSLR or scan from color film and apply a base monochrome conversion in LR. If you import a B&W scanned image, LR detects it as such and does not provide the spectral composition sliders, not that there is anything to work with in the first place


Steve
02-17-2014, 09:12 PM   #26
Veteran Member




Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Sydney
Posts: 671
But that's not how colour filters work in black and white photography.
Pretty much at that point you already lost the light spectrum information and you are dealing with RGB values. It's a bit of colour theory at this point.
If I use Deep red filter with one of the films mentioned above, like Rollei Retro 80s or 400s which are infra-red sensitive (don't forget all films have different spectral sensitivity as well).
I will be blocking most of the light out and mostly taking photo with red and near infra-red spectrum.

According to this little graph, I would be blocking all of the light below 600nm. And according to this graph your sliders don't seem to be correct at all.


Here's a photo taken with the above mentioned filter and Rollei Retro 400S of mountains around 80km away behind deep blue haze on very humid day in Nepal.
I also have colour photo and the mountains are barely visible, since blue light scattered and destroyed the contrast.

Like I said, it might be ok to achieve certain look, but it's no the same thing as filters and it will never replace filters.


Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
film, filter, people, post, steve
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bit OT, b&w film for night exposures Vendee Pentax Film SLR Discussion 8 07-18-2013 12:57 PM
Filters for B&W Film cali92rs Pentax Film SLR Discussion 4 05-15-2013 09:51 PM
Help for a B&W film newbie Jonathan Mac Film Processing, Scanning, and Darkroom 11 05-30-2012 12:31 AM
B&W film for portrait work Vendee Pentax Film SLR Discussion 9 05-16-2009 04:43 AM
B&W Film vs Color Neg to B&W Conversion?? k100d Pentax Film SLR Discussion 14 05-06-2009 08:52 AM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 02:48 AM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top