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03-01-2014, 12:05 PM   #1
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Coming back to film :)

In my quest for a second body to compliment my K5 I ended up acquiring an *ist film body. I'm excited for many reasons, 1st I almost got this camera new back in 2003 but decided to go digital, 2nd by going digital for so many years I've missed some of the reasons I started shooting to begin with. 3rd I'm really hoping this takes me back to those reasons and gets me thinking and composing my shots more than click check screen, delete try again...so I'm sure I will have a ton of questions on film types and processing etc...Because I know digital has come along way and fewer and fewer places are supporting film...but I'm just still glad to be here.

JJ

03-01-2014, 12:12 PM   #2
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Woohoo! There are still plenty of places that do film. Glad to see you coming back. If you do B&W, the best lab is your bathroom-- it's not hard, and there's a wealth of knowledge and support on here, as well as the dedicated analog forums.

For color, slide film is amazing for landscapes. AgfaPhoto Precisia is rebaged Provia 100f, and can be had for about $6-7 bucks a roll online. Provia 100f printed well will still amaze you side by side to your K-5.

When I made the full time switch back to film, it was after shooting digital and slide film side by side-- I spent hours trying to get the white balance, contrast, and colors dead on with my digital shots. My slides came back, and still looked better.

Good C-41 film still beats the DR of any digital system. Shoot Portra 400, and you can get somewhere in the range of 16-18 stops of dynamic range. Portra 160 is finer grained, and Ektar has great colors.

If you do C-41, it's a little harder to develop on your own, but mail order develop only is cheap. If you get serious about C-41, get yourself a good scanner. Anything short of a drum scan won't capture all the detail on a C-41 frame. You can also use a slide copier attatchment (used, or the new one Pentax announced) and bracket. You can get good straight shots, or do layer masks in PS and do some dodging and burning to get more detail.
03-01-2014, 12:41 PM   #3
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QuoteOriginally posted by fretlessdavis Quote
Woohoo! There are still plenty of places that do film. Glad to see you coming back. If you do B&W, the best lab is your bathroom-- it's not hard, and there's a wealth of knowledge and support on here, as well as the dedicated analog forums.

For color, slide film is amazing for landscapes. AgfaPhoto Precisia is rebaged Provia 100f, and can be had for about $6-7 bucks a roll online. Provia 100f printed well will still amaze you side by side to your K-5.

When I made the full time switch back to film, it was after shooting digital and slide film side by side-- I spent hours trying to get the white balance, contrast, and colors dead on with my digital shots. My slides came back, and still looked better.

Good C-41 film still beats the DR of any digital system. Shoot Portra 400, and you can get somewhere in the range of 16-18 stops of dynamic range. Portra 160 is finer grained, and Ektar has great colors.

If you do C-41, it's a little harder to develop on your own, but mail order develop only is cheap. If you get serious about C-41, get yourself a good scanner. Anything short of a drum scan won't capture all the detail on a C-41 frame. You can also use a slide copier attatchment (used, or the new one Pentax announced) and bracket. You can get good straight shots, or do layer masks in PS and do some dodging and burning to get more detail.

Wow good info to start, I'll look into the scanner and see what b&h prices are on the film, I'm familiar with Dwayne's for mail order. As for b&w in my bathroom not gonna happen I have six kids I will never get piece and quite long enough to try it...

JJ
03-01-2014, 12:48 PM   #4
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QuoteOriginally posted by jerryleejr Quote
Wow good info to start, I'll look into the scanner and see what b&h prices are on the film, I'm familiar with Dwayne's for mail order. As for b&w in my bathroom not gonna happen I have six kids I will never get piece and quite long enough to try it...

JJ
Sad to hear it, that! I'd recommend one of the C-41 B&W films, if you do ant B&W. Since they're dye based, they're pretty fine grained, and are cheaper to process. They also scan better, since they work with ICE.

I love Dwayne's. I don't scan my slides myself, I do everything I can to get it right in camera. I then mail the slides off for Dwayne's to print, specifying 'no corrections;. I get fantastic results back.

One of the older Nikon Coolscans works excellent for 35mm, but depending on what print size you want, your K-5, an external flash and slide copying setup might be quicker and easier.

I still project slides. There's nothing like gathering around for a nice slide show, pizza, and beer, a while after a nice backpacking trip or big event.

Maybe you could make your kids sit down for 'family slide shows?' As much as I hated them when they were happening when I was a kid, looking back, they were pretty awesome.

03-01-2014, 01:09 PM   #5
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QuoteOriginally posted by fretlessdavis Quote
Sad to hear it, that! I'd recommend one of the C-41 B&W films, if you do ant B&W. Since they're dye based, they're pretty fine grained, and are cheaper to process. They also scan better, since they work with ICE.

I love Dwayne's. I don't scan my slides myself, I do everything I can to get it right in camera. I then mail the slides off for Dwayne's to print, specifying 'no corrections;. I get fantastic results back.

One of the older Nikon Coolscans works excellent for 35mm, but depending on what print size you want, your K-5, an external flash and slide copying setup might be quicker and easier.

I still project slides. There's nothing like gathering around for a nice slide show, pizza, and beer, a while after a nice backpacking trip or big event.

Maybe you could make your kids sit down for 'family slide shows?' As much as I hated them when they were happening when I was a kid, looking back, they were pretty awesome.
Well I'm hoping to get them involved, gonna pick up a k1000 for my oldest, as for the film is provia a type or brand? I see Fuji has provia 100f but not anyone else. I also saw the C-41 from kodak now this was just looking at B&H I'm sure there are more places...Also one of my printers came with a negative scanner attachment I'll have to dig it out...man I have a lot to learn...

JJ
03-01-2014, 01:14 PM   #6
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Provia 100f is a Fuji slide film. It's the finest grain, and the best for all-purpose. Velvia is much more saturated, and gives skin tones a bit too much red. It also has a bit less dynamic range, so makes anything in full sunlight difficult. It's my favorite general purpose color film because it's so fine grained. The AgfaPhoto is the same stuff, just in a different packaging, for about 30% less.

Kodak for C-41 is the way to go-- Portra 400 can be used as an 'adjustable ISO' film-- I have. It has so much latitude that I've shot it anywhere from 100-800 on the same roll and gotten very usable results. For landscapes, if you go with more C-41 film, Ektar 100 is very saturated and fine-grained.

best thing to do when starting out, in my opinion, is to look through what the films are intended for, and people's general results, and pick one or two films and stick with them. It's easier to get used to the characteristics of one or two films, than trying to learn them all, especially since you have to go through a full roll.

If you don't need big prints, I actually REALLY like the Fujicolor 200. It doesn't scan super well, but It makes good prints to 8x10. It's also under $2 a roll, so you can play with it a lot more while relearning, as opposed to $5-$7 a roll film.
03-01-2014, 08:23 PM   #7
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JJ you are a lightweight... I went film last year and have eight kids :-) I do my c-41 and b&w in the garage after the kids are in bed!

---------- Post added 03-01-14 at 10:28 PM ----------

Oh, and some advice.... since you have a large family, you probably won't want to spend 2 hours or more scanning in 36 shots per roll... I would highly suggest you purchase a used Pakon 135 from AAA imaging. You will have the entire roll scanned and looking like it came off a frontier or noritsu in 3 minutes. A few hoops to jump through but scanning is the *worst* part of the workflow for film. And you don't need to do much work at all in post :-) PM me if you want more info on the Pakon or join the facebook group for it. A flatbed scanner isn't worth it if you do any kind of volume.
03-01-2014, 08:43 PM   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by Jamey777 Quote
JJ you are a lightweight... I went film last year and have eight kids :-) I do my c-41 and b&w in the garage after the kids are in bed!

---------- Post added 03-01-14 at 10:28 PM ----------

Oh, and some advice.... since you have a large family, you probably won't want to spend 2 hours or more scanning in 36 shots per roll... I would highly suggest you purchase a used Pakon 135 from AAA imaging. You will have the entire roll scanned and looking like it came off a frontier or noritsu in 3 minutes. A few hoops to jump through but scanning is the *worst* part of the workflow for film. And you don't need to do much work at all in post :-) PM me if you want more info on the Pakon or join the facebook group for it. A flatbed scanner isn't worth it if you do any kind of volume.
My garage is filled with all their junk and a few of my toys, as for scanning you read my mind I've been researching it all ready...I'll look into the pakon all I was coming up with a couple decent but slow ones from B&H...PM me I would love to talk offline...

JJ

03-02-2014, 06:51 AM   #9
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You will love it! In my camera bag that goes almost everywhere with me I have a digital camera and whatever the 'film camera of the week' is. With digital its way too easy to rapid-fire a bunch of frames and you can see right away what you have. With film, knowing that every shot costs $$ and you don't know what you get until later, it forces one to think about the basics of composition and exposure. When I shoot digital I might bang off a couple dozen shots in a half hour. The other day I spent an hour wandering and took 10.

Where I live there are plenty of places that develop film, even same day. Walmart is where I get the bulk of it, (Fuji) but I get my Ilford B&W from a local camera shop and Adorama and B&H both stock lots of film. Ilford XP2 can be processed with color C-41, for me that's the way to go because my guy does that. If I do Delta or HP5 it has to go out of state and takes a couple of weeks plus its way more $$.
03-02-2014, 08:39 AM   #10
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Developing negatives is so easy that you can do it in the field using only one solution . . . back in 1960 anyway . . .



I wonder how good was this and if there is such a kit available today?
03-02-2014, 08:48 AM   #11
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QuoteOriginally posted by LesDMess Quote
Developing negatives is so easy that you can do it in the field using only one solution . . . back in 1960 anyway . . .



I wonder how good was this and if there is such a kit available today?
i've considered making something similar!

I have a very portable 35mm enlarger, and have been thinking about making a 'briefcase' style baseboard, with enough room for 8x10 trays, developing tank, small pack of paper, darkbag and some blackout cloth.

For chemicals, a 100 ml bottle of HC-110 or Rodinal, 100 ml bottle of stop concentrate, small measured quantity of Dektol powder, and a 250 ml bottle of rapid fix concentrate.

A couple other things, too, but a complete darkroom in a suitcase!
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