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06-19-2014, 09:22 PM   #1
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Filter or non-filter. Take me coach, I do not smoke.

Greetings,

I have a Pentax SF-10 and planning to use my Pentax-M SMC 80~200mm f4.5 Lens for shooting some black and white film. My question is, do I leave my Hoya UV Haze filter on the lens or not?

Thank you for any assistance.

Tony

P.S. I am planning on shooting on a very bright, sunny day. I am also planning to use some old buildings such as, barns, stables, paddocks and the like here in rural Oregon.


Last edited by Tonytee; 06-19-2014 at 10:15 PM.
06-19-2014, 09:27 PM   #2
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Yes. BUT you might want to change it for a Yellow, Orange or Red filter to change the colours, particularly of the sky, if you are using Black and White film.

Regards

Chris
06-19-2014, 09:30 PM - 1 Like   #3
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QuoteOriginally posted by Tonytee Quote
P.S. I am planning on shooting on a very bright, sunny day. I am also plannng to use some old buildings such as, barns, stables, paddocks and the like here in rural Oregon.
I also live in rural Oregon. I'd like to know how you 'plan' for a bright, sunny day.

For black & white you'll want a red filter to darken the skies and add punch to clouds. The haze filter might help (marginally) increase contrast a bit when there's smoke in the air, or pollen or dust - but only if you're shooting some distant vistas. For water and forest, you'll want a polarizer.
06-19-2014, 09:59 PM   #4
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QuoteOriginally posted by OregonJim Quote
I also live in rural Oregon. I'd like to know how you 'plan' for a bright, sunny day.
You go between July 15 and August 15. Simple.

06-19-2014, 10:05 PM   #5
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QuoteOriginally posted by jatrax Quote
You go between July 15 and August 15. Simple.
Yeah, that gives you pretty good odds of getting at least one dry, sunny day.
06-19-2014, 10:23 PM   #6
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Thanks for the great replies. We live in Beaverton, Or. This is our way of forecasting the weather. If you can't see Mt. Hood, it is raining. If you can see Mt. Hood it is going to rain. How can you tell it is summer in Oregon? The rain is warmer. I am planning on journeying out to Roy, Dilly, Cornelius and possibly Forest Grove. There are some really old (100+ years) churches in the area just begging to be shot with Ilford HP5 PLUS. ISO 400 with 36 exp. Thanks again for the help.

Tony
06-20-2014, 07:31 AM   #7
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Be advised a red filter can cost you 3 stops of light. That is, shooting 100 film will be like shooting ISO 12 film. It also darkens your shadows deeply too because it cuts the blue out of them. And conifer trees tend to get real black. You may even want open up a stop more than normal (eg ISO 6) depending if your scene has a lot of shadows in them.

You may even need a tripod if you are stopping the lens down for DOF due to the slow shutter speeds you can get with a red filter. Perhaps an orange filter instead. It only costs you 2 stops. But the advise of using a yellow filter as a good general purpose filter is good too. It only costs you 1 stop of light. So if your scene does not have a lot of puffy, white clouds in them, you may be better served with a yellow or orange. But those are the fun decisions you get to make as a BW film photographer.

Last edited by tuco; 06-20-2014 at 08:00 AM.
06-20-2014, 08:23 AM   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by OregonJim Quote
Yeah, that gives you pretty good odds of getting at least one dry, sunny day.
That's ridiculous, all this nonsense about it raining all the time in Oregon is just silly. I know we are supposed to say that to keep the tourists out but come on. Why last year there were 4 sunny days in August alone.

06-20-2014, 08:49 AM   #9
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Whiners! I'll take your ~15-20% more sunny days per year than I get up here in Seattle. And for people living in other states, we are talking about the West side of the cascade mountains. The East side has way more sunshine by comparison.
06-20-2014, 09:06 AM   #10
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Depending on the film, I often shoot with a yellow filter (Y2, K2) as a matter of course. Most panchromatic films are more sensitive on the blue end of the spectrum and have poor response to red light. The yellow filter tends to even things out. The filter factor generally only exacts a one stop penalty. I am also fond of Wratten #12 (minus blue). It is like a yellow filter on steroids, has a filter factor of one and avoids the exaggerated contrast of a red filter.


Steve
06-20-2014, 09:43 AM   #11
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It will not harm anything... however as it has pointed ut before a polarizer and a colored filter (yellow, red, orange) will help a lot to bring the skies and colors
06-20-2014, 09:50 PM   #12
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Yes filters are your friend when shooting any kind of film, so yes use them. They are just as important when shooting colour film as with b&w.

Phil.
07-17-2014, 12:27 AM   #13
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Greetings again,

A quick rundown on what happened out there. I ended up in Sherwood, Oregon. Really, a beautiful community on a very bright, sunny, beautiful day. I have to admit I am really impressed with the results. I was expecting a complete disaster because I felt with all my fumbling around nothing good would come of it. I feel Ilford is a very forgiving film. At first glance I believed that leaving the Hoya 25A Red filter on top of the Hoya UV filter was a good idea. Then I thought some of the photos looked a little washed out. Perhaps a little hazy at first. Then I reasoned that I watch color TV, shoot mainly color film, go to the cinemas and watch color movies, then do a complete 360 turn around and shoot black and white film. Now, for the down side. On the way home I still had four of five exposures left out of a total of 36. So I decided to get to an area where there is some great vistas including Mt. Hood. Somehow I managed to lose an entire mountain. It was gone, out of the picture. Then I realized, I should have done some bracketing, even with so few exposures left. Why did the mountain not show up? Everything else did. Thanks for reading. Tony. My equipment is a Nikon N8008s with an AF Nikkor 70-210mm non-D lens. Adios.

Last edited by Tonytee; 07-17-2014 at 12:29 AM. Reason: Punctuation error
07-17-2014, 09:25 AM   #14
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Tony, can you post a picture?
It may just be haze.....
07-17-2014, 09:44 AM   #15
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QuoteOriginally posted by Tonytee Quote
I believed that leaving the Hoya 25A Red filter on top of the Hoya UV filter was a good idea.
The washed out images were probably due to veiling flare from the multiple glass surfaces. I would generally advise against stacking filters.

As for the missing mountain...that happens a lot here in the Portland area. The cause is atmospheric haze coupled with UV sensitivity of the film and mild over-exposure.


Steve
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