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05-24-2008, 03:14 PM   #1
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Questions RE: B&W film processing

Hello!

This is probably a dumb question but I'll plunge ahead!

I want to add a film camera for the primary purpose of shooting B&W film. Most of you will probably agree that getting really good B&W from digital is very tough.

I want to try Tri-X and Kodak's 400CN film.

My question(s) is this. How do I get the fim developed (what is the term for this) so I can scan the negatives into my computer and then print them on my own B&W paper and printer? I can't afford $20 plus to get prints made, and I have a pretty good quality scanner and photo printer.

Thanks for your help. I hope I explained the question.

Bob

05-24-2008, 03:43 PM   #2
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You can take it to your local photo lab and ask them to develop it ( the 400CN is compatible with the CN-41 process which all labs support), and then scan your pictures and burn them to a CD. No prints necessary.
05-24-2008, 03:57 PM   #3
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Hmmmmmm. You don't like what is available for B&W printing from digital files, but you are planning on printing B&W film from digital files?
I'm seeing all the disadvanteges of film combined with all the disadvantages of digital.
Is there a good part of this I am missing.
05-24-2008, 04:00 PM   #4
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I thought if I scanned B&W negatives that I could enter up with better quality (and realistic) B&W photos, but my total ignorance of this subject is probably evident.

05-24-2008, 04:08 PM   #5
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Sorry, that was a bit snide.
Anyway, once the file hits the digital stage, it matters not if it came from a digital camera or a scanner as far as ease of getting a good print is concerned.
I think actually that it is easier to get a good inkjet or digital lab print from a digital original than it is from a film original, especially B&W.
I think what is best to address is the specifics of what you are having trouble with regarding getting decent monochrome prints off your K100 and istD
05-24-2008, 06:20 PM   #6
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If I shoot Tri-X B&W, where would you recommend I get the film developed/processed?
05-24-2008, 06:52 PM   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by Rmpjr7 Quote
If I shoot Tri-X B&W, where would you recommend I get the film developed/processed?
Process it yourself. It isn't difficult.
05-24-2008, 11:53 PM   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by Rmpjr7 Quote
If I shoot Tri-X B&W, where would you recommend I get the film developed/processed?
Where in Florida are you? Fototechnika on Lomax Street in Jacksonville will process the film for $6.00 per roll using the "dip and dunk" method. I don't know what chemicals they use but you can contact them to find out.
904-356-2503
FotoTechnika EMAIL: info@fototechnika.com

E-Six lab in Atlanta offers professional black and white negative film processing from 35mm in a 3.5 gallon hand line using Edwal FG7 developer. They charge $9.00 for developing and an additional $9.00 if you want an 8x10 contact sheet.
404.885.1293 Voice
877.885.ESIX Toll Free
info@e-sixlab.com

05-25-2008, 01:11 AM   #9
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QuoteOriginally posted by Wheatfield Quote
Process it yourself. It isn't difficult.

It never occured to me to develope my own film. Not sure why. So, I looked up how it is done. You're right. It does look easy.

But then I found this.

DIY film - a set on Flickr

This dude makes his own film!

Talk about hard core. How do people find the time to do these things?
05-25-2008, 11:13 PM   #10
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If you are going to use TriX, you might as well process yourself
It is easy, and rewarding to see your own images come up in the way YOU want them.
You will screw up once in a while, but that is the learning curve... noworries
I think for about $40 you can get all you need to get started, but beware this is highly addictive

If you prefer to send your film out first send a test roll in which you have bracketed a few picutres to determine which is the best film speed for the processors methods.
For triX I'd test 200(-1),400(0),800(+1),1600 (+2) in a certain image with a wide tonal range
05-28-2008, 11:09 AM   #11
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QuoteOriginally posted by Rmpjr7 Quote

I want to add a film camera for the primary purpose of shooting B&W film. Most of you will probably agree that getting really good B&W from digital is very tough.
seriously?

who in the world told you that? thats nonsense.

its only "tough" if the words "post processing" send chills down your back and scaling sliders as a concept causes your brain to implode...
05-28-2008, 11:50 AM   #12
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QuoteOriginally posted by Gooshin Quote
seriously?

who in the world told you that? thats nonsense.

its only "tough" if the words "post processing" send chills down your back and scaling sliders as a concept causes your brain to implode...
One of the keys to getting good B&W from digital is to have a completely calibrated workflow. Small variations in calibration that won't show up in a colour print will show up as a colour cast in monochrome. If you aren't using some sort of screen calibration device, B&W can be a nightmare.
05-28-2008, 11:55 AM   #13
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QuoteOriginally posted by Wheatfield Quote
One of the keys to getting good B&W from digital is to have a completely calibrated workflow. Small variations in calibration that won't show up in a colour print will show up as a colour cast in monochrome. If you aren't using some sort of screen calibration device, B&W can be a nightmare.
when you hit the b/w button in a raw/image converter you no longer need to worry about any of that

the only impact calibration now has is the accuracy of your tonal adjustments...
05-28-2008, 12:04 PM   #14
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QuoteOriginally posted by Gooshin Quote
when you hit the b/w button in a raw/image converter you no longer need to worry about any of that

the only impact calibration now has is the accuracy of your tonal adjustments...
I'm kinda old school. I still convert via adjustment layers. I haven't found the one button conversions give me what I want, so I end up fiddling more after that than I do with either the Channel Mixer or Black & White adjustment layer.
Anyway, if your screen isn't calibrated, you really can't trust it to give an accurate assessment of the final print, be it B&W or colour.
05-28-2008, 12:14 PM   #15
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QuoteOriginally posted by Wheatfield Quote
I'm kinda old school. I still convert via adjustment layers. I haven't found the one button conversions give me what I want, so I end up fiddling more after that than I do with either the Channel Mixer or Black & White adjustment layer.
Anyway, if your screen isn't calibrated, you really can't trust it to give an accurate assessment of the final print, be it B&W or colour.
i dont know what program you use,

but with adobe lightroom, you hit the b/w button and all the tones go into a grayscale, ie, no more colour, regardless of your monitor calibration.

but wait folks! thats not all

you then can still adjust each of the 8 colours individual grayscale range

and you can still add exposure, contrast, brightness and all that other junk

you have your entire histogram that you can screw around with.

these things matter more with calibration, but at the same time you can trust the histogram to avoid blowout.



it is your choice to under use the tools in front of you, however this bares no impact on their actual effectiveness.
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