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06-01-2015, 04:33 AM   #1
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dslr film scanning

I've been having a lot of fun with my spotmatic, am planning on learning how to develop my own film to reduce my costs. Along with this I'm hoping to start scanning my own photos. I have a K3 and a 100mm macro lens and am a pretty active wood worker, so I imagine I could probably make some kind of jig that holds the camera and film a fixed, adjustable distance, and would incorporate a flash mount. I was hoping some of you fine folks could provide me with some inspiration for what these dslr film scanning set ups look like. I remember someone posted one a while ago on this forum, but I can't seem to find it now.

06-01-2015, 04:51 AM   #2
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I will be facing the same challenge. I might use my Canon G12 with its 1:1 macro
06-01-2015, 04:59 AM - 2 Likes   #3
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My own DSLR film copying rig is made from the innards of a cheap Ion film "scanner" -- one of those things that use a crappy built-in 5MP camera and produce lousy results. I've retained the LED light source and the circuit board to power it, and adapted it to work with a DSLR and macro lens.

Here's the rig:





And a couple of sample shots:





06-01-2015, 06:49 AM - 3 Likes   #4
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Three keys:

1. Have an even, full spectrum light source. I use a light table with the camera oriented vertically.
2. Use a clamping system to keep the film as flat as possible. This is particularly important if you are using strip negatives.
3. Remmove as much dust as possible from the film prior to completing your scan, or you will be spending a lot of time in post removing all the specks.

The Postprocessing challenge I recently hosted used a negative "scan" I didusing my light table setup on a 645 Portra negative. Feel free to contact me if you'd like any tips on digital processing of negative images.



06-01-2015, 09:48 AM   #5
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I like the high-keyish result which seems very suitable for the subject matter.
06-01-2015, 11:49 AM   #6
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Would you recommend creating a rig like this as opposed to purchasing, say, the Jumbl scanner (which does 35mm at 16 megapixels)?
06-01-2015, 12:45 PM   #7
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Here is a link to photos & explanation of my homemade rig: Old Photo Shooting Rig - darylkottwitzphoto. It works fine.
06-01-2015, 02:43 PM   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by WDibble Quote
Would you recommend creating a rig like this as opposed to purchasing, say, the Jumbl scanner (which does 35mm at 16 megapixels)?

The Jumbl type scanners just use a tiny compact camera sized sensor and a very basic cheap lens, so the output is quite poor. A well constructed and carefully used DSLR rig will give dramatically better results, for a lot less money since you're likely to already have many of the components you need.

An old enlarger base as the camera support and a light box as the light source is one way quick and easy way of doing it.

06-01-2015, 03:29 PM - 1 Like   #9
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Here's my process for both small and medium/large format:



Since recording those, I've changed to an 85mm Rodagon enlarging lens for digitizing. The results are significantly improved and truer to the film. Also, that makes getting a frame reduction to fill the APS-C sensor size easier. I also added a tube of M42 macro tubs (with some step-up and -down rings) to close of the space between the front of the lens and slide holder. This improves image contrast. Lining the tubes with felt eliminated the very minor hot spotting issues I've have on exposures longer than 1/4 second (for very under exposed slides or overexposed negatives.)

Here are some recent results:








One nice thing about digitizing with a DSLR is that you can pull it back a bit and keep the image frame if you'd like.



06-01-2015, 04:44 PM   #10
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I have setup similar to K David. Here are two threads I posted about camera-scanning my negatives.

https://www.pentaxforums.com/forums/107-film-processing-scanning-darkroom/258...-film-pix.html

This thread was posted when I was still using a K-30. Now I have a K-3 with a FluCard. Same basic principles apply.

https://www.pentaxforums.com/forums/107-film-processing-scanning-darkroom/294...can-films.html

I've moved from Aperture to Capture One too.
06-01-2015, 07:11 PM   #11
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I'm developing an interest in film. Maybe it is nostalgia, as my dad had a K1000 when I was a kid. I'm considering trying a k1000 / kx etc. I'm keen to learn. I found a couple of negatives of my grandparents from the late seventies. I think he died in 79.

My first attempt was on friday. I didn't have a lot of time so avoided the complicated setups and simply taped the film to a window. I reversed the toning in LR and removed dozens of white dots / lines. Could be dust maybe. I used the 35 ltd macro lens. I'm fairly happy with the results. The downside is that I had to tilt the tripod to get this lens close enough, so my lens may not be perpendicular to the photo. This would've affected sharpeness I'm sure. I also had to use a slightly higher ISO/Shutter.

EDIT: I also chose B&W because I'm not great with colours. It also had a yellowish tone I couldn't discern its accuracy. Maybe ashen grey is more appropriate for someone who died before I was born..?? Maybe not.
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06-01-2015, 09:01 PM   #12
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You can "cancel" out most tints with correct adjustment of white balance, white tint point, grey tint point, and black tint point.
06-02-2015, 12:04 AM - 1 Like   #13
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Find below a picture of my set-up.

You can see it is very simple! I am using my K-3 + Tamron 90/2.8 AF. I cutted a hole (this case 24x36) in a thick paper (from a shoe box), where I glued a thin folded paper which serves as a guide for the film. I painted in black the edges of the paper. Then, as you see, I use a tripod, and I made a sort of long lens-hood, black again, which goes all the way down to the film. Best is the uniform bright back-light for which I use nothing but my mobile phone! Maximum brightness, screen always on, and I believe the name of the app is "WhiteScreen", downloadable from the Google Play Store.

It all works great, very fast, no prob whatsoever. Two examples, below.

Cheers
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06-02-2015, 04:26 AM   #14
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Bookmarked that breakdown. I keep seeing 85 and 90mm macros. My Pentax is my film shooter. My digital is a Canon T5i, which is an APS-C with 18MP, so I don't think that's an issue, but I only have a 60mm f/2.8 macro, and its all I can afford. Think that will work?
06-02-2015, 05:54 AM   #15
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That should be no problem. I use a 50mm f/2.8 FA. Working distance will be a little less, but as long as it is a macro lens, you should get a nice, flat focal plane.

QuoteOriginally posted by WDibble Quote
Bookmarked that breakdown. I keep seeing 85 and 90mm macros. My Pentax is my film shooter. My digital is a Canon T5i, which is an APS-C with 18MP, so I don't think that's an issue, but I only have a 60mm f/2.8 macro, and its all I can afford. Think that will work?
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