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07-09-2008, 09:59 AM   #16
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QuoteOriginally posted by falconeye Quote
There is no easy winner as of today and my comment wanted to clarify this in sight of the sample shot and resolution comment provided earlier in the thread. As Provia doesn't resolve 20 MP, really.
Absolutely, it doesn't. The Nikon itself has been shown to actually be closer to only 3200dpi as well.

I should apologize to the OP. I used the 20MP in parenthesis not as a comparison to digital, but as a way of saying it had 20 million pixels and was a big file for those that have a slow connection. I should have worded it better.

However I think we can all agree... Fuji makes wonderful film!

07-10-2008, 05:17 PM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by Vertex Ninja Quote
P.S. Provia scans great too. Here is an excellent 4000dpi Nikon scan(20mp) of a horrible picture, but at least it's good for seeing resolution! :P Even at that res there is essentially 0 grain. ZX-L w/Vivitar S1 105 macro.
Please don't take this personally - am I imagining things or is there quite a lot of highlight clipping in that scan? Is that characteristic of the Nikon or have you been a bit overzealous with the levels? Or is it my monitor gamma ...

My two cents' worth on the resolution thing is that resolution is pretty much irrelevant these days for film shooters. I'm happy to concede superiority in that regard to the digital brigade. I just want that special grain that film gives. I like blowing my images up and seeing all that soft, organic randomness. It pleases me in a way that pixels and chroma noise never can. Although one day I'm sure I will buy a DSLR - when they make one as simple and pretty as the LX.

Sorry to go off topic. Back on topic, someone mentioned that Provia isn't especially fine-grained. Maybe not compared to Velvia (perhaps) but I use Provia 400 a lot and that is really fine, much more so than, say, Sensia 200. Of course, you may like the heavy grain.
07-10-2008, 06:17 PM   #18
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It's slide film. Provia 100F. Once the highlights are gone they are gone. Flash on a shiny white/clear object = goodbye highlights. :P There was no post processing(except sharpening) on that image and the scanner was color calibrated. It was really just a test image to compare different scanners.

35mm form factor digital is the same when it concerns highlights. They only have 5-6 stops of exposure latitude. Medium format digital backs have 11-12 stops of latitude. Here is a K10D shot with the same lens and flash in a similar situation.

I've read(and find) Provia has finer grain than Velvia. Astia 100F even finer, but Velvia 50 and 100 still have higher resolution.

Edit: more test scans here

Last edited by Vertex Ninja; 07-10-2008 at 07:19 PM.
07-11-2008, 05:08 PM   #19
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Yeah. Sometimes, the highlights, if you just look at the slide itself, it'll look like some of the emulsion got torn off it.

Still, I find it handles highlights more nicely than digital - a gentler descent into full-on whiteness, rather than the sharp, all-or-nothing of digital.

Not that I want to get into the film-vs-digi debate. It's like an oil painter going up to a jazz musician and saying, "You know what, painting's a whole lot better than music is getting your point across."

07-12-2008, 04:27 AM   #20
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QuoteOriginally posted by lithos Quote
Still, I find it handles highlights more nicely than digital - a gentler descent into full-on whiteness, rather than the sharp, all-or-nothing of digital.
I think that this is recognized industry-wide. It is said to be one of the reasons why newer cameras feature their extended dynamic range stuff. It makes them more competitive with film in this regard (the "gentler descent into full-on whiteness").
07-15-2008, 02:30 AM   #21
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QuoteOriginally posted by artobest Quote


My two cents' worth on the resolution thing is that resolution is pretty much irrelevant these days for film shooters. I'm happy to concede superiority in that regard to the digital brigade. I just want that special grain that film gives. I like blowing my images up and seeing all that soft, organic randomness. It pleases me in a way that pixels and chroma noise never can. Although one day I'm sure I will buy a DSLR - when they make one as simple and pretty as the LX.

Sorry to go off topic. Back on topic, someone mentioned that Provia isn't especially fine-grained. Maybe not compared to Velvia (perhaps) but I use Provia 400 a lot and that is really fine, much more so than, say, Sensia 200. Of course, you may like the heavy grain.
You should especially love then the JPEGs from a K10D, they were reportidly patterned to emulate film, as opposed to the somewhat plastic, over sharpened images that Canikon DSLRs produce
07-16-2008, 04:54 PM   #22
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As for films, I'll ad my voice to the chorus for fujichromes. I absolutely love Velvia 50/100. The greens and blues are mind blowing to me. Admittedly I've not done a whole lot with Kodak films, but that's because I can't imagine anything better than the 'feel' of Velvia. Kodachrome seems a little 'softer' to me in the way it handles color. It's also a pain to get developed- you have to send it out somewhere (I think to Kodak- it's been 4 years since I used it last).
07-21-2008, 04:00 AM   #23
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QuoteOriginally posted by lithos Quote
Yeah. Sometimes, the highlights, if you just look at the slide itself, it'll look like some of the emulsion got torn off it.
In essence, that's just what has happened during the developing process.

QuoteOriginally posted by lithos Quote
Not that I want to get into the film-vs-digi debate. It's like an oil painter going up to a jazz musician and saying, "You know what, painting's a whole lot better than music is getting your point across."
I disagree. A closer analogy would be two pianists - one playing a Bosendorfer grand, the other playing a Farfisa. Guess which is which.

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