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09-06-2015, 02:00 PM   #1
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Halleyscope 2400

I was at a garage sale today and scored a box of telescope stuff(there was a whole decent telescope with a bunch of accessories in the box actually) and there was a hallyscope 2400 that supports adapting to a camera.

My question, is would it be possible to find the adapter for a pentax camera somewheres? I just want to play around with it, nothing serious.

09-06-2015, 04:25 PM   #2
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it's probably a T mount. It should not be difficult to find, but at 2400 mm focal length, it probably has a f32 or so aperture. so I would not expect much. You would have to measure the diameter of the front element to estimate its true aperture. It is probably more useful as a telescope than a lens.
09-06-2015, 06:10 PM   #3
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just found this PDF file.

http://www.bly.com/newsite/Pages/PDFs/consumer-products-halleyscope.pdf


It refers to a 58mm filter size. That would make it an estimated f48 maximum aperture. great depth of field, But it would need a lot of light. and diffraction may be a problem.
09-06-2015, 08:40 PM   #4
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The above literature says it uses T-mount. Zoom focal length is listed as 600 to 2400mm.

https://books.google.com/books?id=-rbIcQgxMGAC&pg=PA97&lpg=PA97&dq=halleysco...202400&f=false

Popular Photography (1984) says the table top tripod is not meant to support with camera attached.

09-07-2015, 07:52 PM   #5
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QuoteOriginally posted by promacjoe Quote
it's probably a T mount. It should not be difficult to find, but at 2400 mm focal length, it probably has a f32 or so aperture. so I would not expect much. You would have to measure the diameter of the front element to estimate its true aperture. It is probably more useful as a telescope than a lens.
yea, what I figured. just thought if the adapter was $20 it would be worth it just to play around with.

QuoteOriginally posted by promacjoe Quote
just found this PDF file.

http://www.bly.com/newsite/Pages/PDFs/consumer-products-halleyscope.pdf


It refers to a 58mm filter size. That would make it an estimated f48 maximum aperture. great depth of field, But it would need a lot of light. and diffraction may be a problem.
that sounds about right.

QuoteOriginally posted by Not a Number Quote
The above literature says it uses T-mount. Zoom focal length is listed as 600 to 2400mm.

https://books.google.com/books?id=-rbIcQgxMGAC&pg=PA97&lpg=PA97&dq=halleysco...202400&f=false

Popular Photography (1984) says the table top tripod is not meant to support with camera attached.
So I just need something like this?
http://www.amazon.com/Fotodiox-Adapter-T-Mount-Pentax-Cameras/dp/B002BFKO2G/...RG1WM11VJ9R9K5

http://www.amazon.com/T-mount-Screw-T2-PK-Pentax-Adapter/dp/B00J7MAMIW/ref=s...nt+to+pentax+K

I didn't expect to, and I also wouldn't trust it to. Its fairly solid but not solid enough to hold a camera and a decently large lense.
09-07-2015, 08:35 PM   #6
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Either of those would work. Personally I would avoid the no name one but brand names mean little these days to. I bought on that was branded either Polaroid or Vivitar (don't recall which). It was made in India and absolute garbage - the threads weren't even the correct pitch. A vintage Vivitar would be ok. So now I won't buy a T-mount unless it is made in Japan.

This is the one I have. Very good to excellent quality. Kalt is another brand that is usually made in Japan.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Qualide-T-Mount-Lens-Adapter-for-Pentax-K-35mm-SLR-F...item3f26f6d33d
09-08-2015, 10:05 AM   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by Not a Number Quote
Either of those would work. Personally I would avoid the no name one but brand names mean little these days to. I bought on that was branded either Polaroid or Vivitar (don't recall which). It was made in India and absolute garbage - the threads weren't even the correct pitch. A vintage Vivitar would be ok. So now I won't buy a T-mount unless it is made in Japan.

This is the one I have. Very good to excellent quality. Kalt is another brand that is usually made in Japan.

Qualide T Mount Lens Adapter for Pentax K 35mm SLR Film Camera 25 166 2227 | eBay
Okay, thanks!
10-01-2015, 07:35 PM   #8
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Did you have any luck capturing images using the Halleyscope? I've got the same telescope and ordered the T-mount. Sadly, I realized that the box did not include the adapter to mount between the t-mount and the telescope.

10-02-2015, 06:08 AM   #9
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I haven't had the time to play with it yet. but when I do, I will let ya know
10-02-2015, 06:11 PM   #10
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QuoteOriginally posted by promacjoe Quote
just found this PDF file.
http://www.bly.com/newsite/Pages/PDFs/consumer-products-halleyscope.pdf
It refers to a 58mm filter size. That would make it an estimated f48 maximum aperture. great depth of field, But it would need a lot of light. and diffraction may be a problem.
I think it's interesting that the scope is marketed as a "Halleyscope" by "Halley Optical". Methinks that the scope was marketed to appeal to general consumers by trying to connect the scope to public interest in Comet Halley (back in the 80's).

The sad part is that a scope with a long FL and a 40mm objective lens will produce, even if the image were sharp, a very, very dim view of a very, very small part of the sky - exactly what would NOT be useful for finding or viewing a large but dim comet image. OTOH, the Halleyscope might provide at least a half-decent view of the Moon or even Jupiter (assuming that one could find Jupiter using it).

In contrast, I have a scope that also came out of the comet craze of the 80's, a Celestron "Comet Catcher" ( http://geogdata.csun.edu/~voltaire/classics/celestron/Comet_Catcher1980.pdf ), also obviously named to connect to public interest in The Comet. However, the CC is a wide field Schmidt Newtonian (500mm FL, 140mm objective, f/3.64) and IS suitable for looking at such things as comets -- but it is not as good for Moon or planetary viewing as a long refractor would be.

[There is no such a thing as one ideal all-around telescope any more than there is any one ideal all-around photo lens.]

Anyhoo, I think the "Comet Catcher" would be a better "Halley scope" than the "Halleyscope", which really should have been given a different (and less misleading) name.
10-02-2015, 11:07 PM   #11
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As I was looking for an adapter to the Halleyscope last night, I turned up a story about Burt Rubin the owner of the short-lived Halley Optical. Turns out he made a bunch of money selling rolling papers before going into the telescope business.

QuoteQuote:
Rubin: I basically liked the action of business. I think there’s a certain edge to it and a gambling to it and so I searched and I saw some articles about Halley’s Comet. It was supposed to return in November of ’85. When it returned in 1910, the sales of telescopes were astronomical–they sold every piece of glass they could get. And I thought that there was an opportunity to buy telescopes and develop a consumer brand name like I had done with E-Z-Wider. And I liked making really good products. I had worked at E-Z-Wider with this senior designer engineer from Polaroid Corporation who knew optics and design. So he also did the telescope which we named the Halleyscope in honor of Edmund Halley, the person who predicted that the comet was going to be sighted, died before the comet came and then the comet showed up just as he had predicted. Edmund Halley was one of the true renaissance men.
We made a very small, very portable telescope that could also be attached to your camera and become a super-telephoto lens, 600 to 2400 mm. The Halleyscope was sold in Sears, Roebuck, J.C. Penney. It got all kinds of write-ups, all over, about the quality. It was considered a best buy in Consumer Digest. I sold 75,000 telescopes. That’s a lot of telescopes. They retailed about $199 dollars.
MG: You were way ahead of the curve when it comes to the importance of branding and marketing.
As for the Halleyscope itself, I can confirm it was pretty good to catch the SuperBloodMoon the other night, but couldn't quite see it being useful for much more in the night sky. I might be able to make a case for it as an ultra long zoom during the day, though.
10-03-2015, 05:06 PM   #12
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QuoteOriginally posted by fwcetus Quote
I think it's interesting that the scope is marketed as a "Halleyscope" by "Halley Optical". Methinks that the scope was marketed to appeal to general consumers by trying to connect the scope to public interest in Comet Halley (back in the 80's).

The sad part is that a scope with a long FL and a 40mm objective lens will produce, even if the image were sharp, a very, very dim view of a very, very small part of the sky - exactly what would NOT be useful for finding or viewing a large but dim comet image. OTOH, the Halleyscope might provide at least a half-decent view of the Moon or even Jupiter (assuming that one could find Jupiter using it).

In contrast, I have a scope that also came out of the comet craze of the 80's, a Celestron "Comet Catcher" ( http://geogdata.csun.edu/~voltaire/classics/celestron/Comet_Catcher1980.pdf ), also obviously named to connect to public interest in The Comet. However, the CC is a wide field Schmidt Newtonian (500mm FL, 140mm objective, f/3.64) and IS suitable for looking at such things as comets -- but it is not as good for Moon or planetary viewing as a long refractor would be.

[There is no such a thing as one ideal all-around telescope any more than there is any one ideal all-around photo lens.]

Anyhoo, I think the "Comet Catcher" would be a better "Halley scope" than the "Halleyscope", which really should have been given a different (and less misleading) name.
Yea it was. I did abunch of research on it when I first got it.
the funny part is, they sold all of these "halleyscopes" and it was cloudy..... So nobody ended up using them for halley's comet anyways.

QuoteOriginally posted by AgentDisco Quote
As I was looking for an adapter to the Halleyscope last night, I turned up a story about Burt Rubin the owner of the short-lived Halley Optical. Turns out he made a bunch of money selling rolling papers before going into the telescope business.



As for the Halleyscope itself, I can confirm it was pretty good to catch the SuperBloodMoon the other night, but couldn't quite see it being useful for much more in the night sky. I might be able to make a case for it as an ultra long zoom during the day, though.
Yup, papers for tobacco weren't long enough so he made longer ones for marijiuna. Don't know if thats completely true... but thats what I was told.

I can agree. I took it out for the bloodmoon and saw it fairly well besides the fact there were some clouds blocking part of it.
My dad pointed that out. He thought maybe I could add a quick release plate to a gunstock type thing, and use it for birdwatching and alike. Thought it was a decent idea.
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