Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
10-28-2015, 01:56 PM   #1
Senior Member
Suleeto's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Southern California
Photos: Albums
Posts: 113
Question about ME without battery power

Ok, so I understand that in the absence of battery power, the ME can still shoot with a 1/100 or a Bulb shutter setting.

What I want to know is, can I use this knob still?



I know that's exposure compensation... so my guess is it slows or speeds up the shutter speed. I understand that with the batteries working, and in AUTO, the camera uses aperture to choose shutter speed and that with that knob on the left, you can adjust up or down two stops worth... so that effectively speeds up or slows the shutter (since the aperture is MC). Is that mechanical or electronic? Meaning, even with the batteries dead/missing, will that knob mechanically speed up or slow down the shutter?

What I am trying to determine is, without battery power and set to 1/100 shutter, will the correction knob still adjust shutter speed (and how exactly). I'm guessing that "stops" up or down are following Sunny 16, just trying to understand that (and understand Sunny 16).

I am trying to see how effective I can use this camera with zero electricity.

10-28-2015, 02:03 PM   #2
Pentaxian
Swift1's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Oregon
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 3,816
You can use that knob if you want, but it won't do anything.

The exposure compensation dial affects the meter (in very basic terms) and has no affect whatsoever on the shutter speed when using the camera without batteries.
10-28-2015, 02:07 PM   #3
Senior Member
Suleeto's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Southern California
Photos: Albums
Posts: 113
Original Poster
Ahhh so the dial is a sort of electronic meter aperture, controlling sensitivity. The meter then decides how much light it is getting, and electronically sets shutter speed in AUTO. Right?

So while in AUTO:

A-ring ---> meter ---> shutter speed.
OR
A-ring ---> compensation dial ---> meter ---> shutter speed.

Yes?
10-28-2015, 02:52 PM   #4
Pentaxian
Swift1's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Oregon
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 3,816
QuoteOriginally posted by Suleeto Quote
Ahhh so the dial is a sort of electronic meter aperture, controlling sensitivity. The meter then decides how much light it is getting, and electronically sets shutter speed in AUTO. Right?

So while in AUTO:

A-ring ---> meter ---> shutter speed.
OR
A-ring ---> compensation dial ---> meter ---> shutter speed.

Yes?
I think that the compensation dial is just a part of the ISO dial which is electronically coupled to the meter.
If you have the the ISO set to 100, and you change the compensation to 2X, you're basically changing the ISO to 50.

10-28-2015, 03:13 PM   #5
Senior Member
Suleeto's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Southern California
Photos: Albums
Posts: 113
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by Swift1 Quote
I think that the compensation dial is just a part of the ISO dial which is electronically coupled to the meter.
If you have the the ISO set to 100, and you change the compensation to 2X, you're basically changing the ISO to 50.
SO without battery power... what is the ISO effectively set at? I'm confused now LOL
10-28-2015, 04:20 PM   #6
Ole
Administrator
Ole's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 3,786
The ISO isn't set if there is no battery. The shutter fires at 1/100s (or bulb) no matter how you set the leftmost dial. The aperture will be whatever value you set on the lens. Don't use the 'A' setting on the lens (if it has one).
10-28-2015, 04:43 PM   #7
Loyal Site Supporter
THoog's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: North Carolina
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 3,401
If you shoot without a battery, you don't have any metering, therefore the camera doesn't know or care about the ISO. YOU have to know the ISO of your film, and estimate the correct aperture based the ISO and available light. Look up the "sunny f/16" rule (basically, on a sunny day, at 1/100 and ISO 100, f/16 should get a correct exposure.) Bulb mode is only going to be useful for long exposures and counting "one potato, two potato" after you work out the correct aperture based on your film and lighting conditions. This is pretty old-school stuff.
10-28-2015, 10:37 PM   #8
Veteran Member




Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 364
Old school maybe.

Most film packs came with a table for

Sunny day picture
125
/11
Two clouds
125
/8

Etc.

Some packs still do

Or you used a calculator

PHOTOGRAPHIC EXPOSURE CALCULATION - A HISTORY

With practice and reducing the ISO by two you are ok with mono, colour was more difficult.

10-29-2015, 08:03 AM   #9
Site Supporter
gofour3's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Vancouver, Canada
Posts: 5,129
QuoteOriginally posted by Suleeto Quote
I am trying to see how effective I can use this camera with zero electricity.
Shooting with no batteries may sound cool, but it's really only for emergencies and on this camera pretty useless.

Phil.
10-29-2015, 09:44 AM   #10
Veteran Member
disconnekt's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Riverside, CA
Posts: 378
Here's the manual for the ME: http://www.cameramanuals.org/pentax_pdf/pentax_me.pdf
It should help you out.
10-29-2015, 11:07 AM   #11
Loyal Site Supporter
AquaDome's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: New Carlisle, IN
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 1,405
The ME isn't very useful without batteries. Fortunately, batteries for it are easy to obtain. If you really want to do without batteries, I recommend the K1000, KX, or MX.
10-30-2015, 01:23 AM   #12
Veteran Member




Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 364
QuoteOriginally posted by AquaDome Quote
The ME isn't very useful without batteries. Fortunately, batteries for it are easy to obtain. If you really want to do without batteries, I recommend the K1000, KX, or MX.
Confirmed my K1000 never sees a battery but when it is two hours to sunset im in a coffee shop sipping a latte,

Google sunny side f16 derate 400 ISO to 200
10-30-2015, 10:31 AM   #13
Loyal Site Supporter




Join Date: Mar 2015
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 4,852
QuoteOriginally posted by AquaDome Quote
If you really want to do without batteries, I recommend the K1000, KX, or MX.
One could also consider a Spotmatic, but then you're limited to the Takumar lenses. It's fine for those who want to collect and experiment with M42 screw-mount lenses (I already had a few, so my Spottie came to me "body only" with lenses ready to go), but if it isn't, then AquaDome's recommendations are good ones.
10-30-2015, 10:50 AM   #14
Senior Moderator
Loyal Site Supporter
Parallax's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: South Dakota
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 15,111
QuoteOriginally posted by Suleeto Quote
Ahhh so the dial is a sort of electronic meter aperture, controlling sensitivity.
I don't believe it actually controls the sensitivity of the meter's sensor, it just tells the meter to lie to the camera and photographer about what it's sensing. i.e. if the scene is EV14 and you have the compensation set at +1 the light meter will lie and tell the camera (and/or you) that the scene is only EV13 so the camera in an auto mode or you in manual will choose a slower shutter speed or larger aperture.

Last edited by Parallax; 10-30-2015 at 10:56 AM.
10-31-2015, 08:26 PM   #15
Pentaxian
titrisol's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: In the most populated state... state of denial
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 1,094
Basically the camera shoots at 1/100 and whatever aperture you have.
The compenstion is useles at this point

QuoteOriginally posted by Suleeto Quote
Ok, so I understand that in the absence of battery power, the ME can still shoot with a 1/100 or a Bulb shutter setting.

What I want to know is, can I use this knob still?



I know that's exposure compensation... so my guess is it slows or speeds up the shutter speed. I understand that with the batteries working, and in AUTO, the camera uses aperture to choose shutter speed and that with that knob on the left, you can adjust up or down two stops worth... so that effectively speeds up or slows the shutter (since the aperture is MC). Is that mechanical or electronic? Meaning, even with the batteries dead/missing, will that knob mechanically speed up or slow down the shutter?

What I am trying to determine is, without battery power and set to 1/100 shutter, will the correction knob still adjust shutter speed (and how exactly). I'm guessing that "stops" up or down are following Sunny 16, just trying to understand that (and understand Sunny 16).

I am trying to see how effective I can use this camera with zero electricity.
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
aperture, batteries, battery, camera, knob, power, shutter, speeds
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
A Quick Question About Power Tools? magkelly General Talk 7 04-03-2015 07:43 PM
Question about battery contacts bwDraco Pentax DSLR Discussion 10 07-04-2012 11:36 AM
Question about the battery adaptor - K-30 vapentaxuser Pentax K-30 & K-50 4 06-07-2012 04:33 PM
Question about K20D battery lifespan pardes Pentax Camera and Field Accessories 2 10-30-2010 08:07 PM
Use Pentax ME Super without battery? iht Troubleshooting and Beginner Help 3 08-05-2009 10:34 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 08:26 PM. | See also: NikonForums.com, part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top