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11-22-2015, 08:10 AM   #16
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I've been shooting digital since its inception pretty much, and I took up film only a couple months ago. I'm surprised, but I really don't miss the lcd as much as I thought. I really enjoy both the shooting and the process of developing black and white film quite a bit more than I expected.

11-22-2015, 09:10 AM   #17
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If your shoot-develop-print (or shoot-develop-scan) cycle is short (hours to a couple of days), the lack of immediate feedback isn't critical - you still remember, to some extent, everything about what you shot and how you shot it when you look at the final image. When you have to send it out and it can be weeks before you see the prints, that changes things. I am seriously considering taking up developing and scanning, even if the specialised consumer scanners you can buy online aren't the best.
11-22-2015, 09:39 AM   #18
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QuoteOriginally posted by baldrob Quote
... do you ever get annoyed not being able to see how the shot looked before developing? As someone who hasn't used a film camera in twenty years I would think it would drive me nuts.
Looking through the gloriously large and bright viewfinders - particularly on the MX and LX, the image I see gets burned into my mind and no amount of chimping on any puny LCD can possibly compare. The LCD viewfinder types doesn't even come close either.
11-22-2015, 10:08 AM   #19
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I've never used a DSLR and never will, so instant viewing of an image would be foreign to me and not something I would be interested in.

I'm happy to wait for my film to be developed before I see the results. Waiting has never bothered me and is just part of the "shooting film" process.

Phil.

11-22-2015, 10:41 AM   #20
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I do not miss the ability to review a shot when I'm using film. I turn the info-screen and instant-review off on my digital cameras.

If you really need instant-review on a film camera, look for a Kodak Advantix Preview. It's an APS film camera with an LCD display on the back for doing exactly what you asked about.
11-22-2015, 10:02 PM   #21
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QuoteOriginally posted by baldrob Quote
... do you ever get annoyed not being able to see how the shot looked before developing? As someone who hasn't used a film camera in twenty years I would think it would drive me nuts.
A little. What I miss more is not being able to review my settings. I find value in knowing the f-stop in particular, since it tells me about the auto-focus system a lot and helps me evaluate a lens' sharpness/flaws. I don't get that with film, unfortunately. For film, the shutter speed would be nice too, since then I can see how I'm doing without shake reduction and adjust shutter speeds accordingly.

If a shot is critical and I feel I can't live without it, I shoot it with both the digicam and the film cam. The film camera is strictly B&W, so it's not terrible to have a color perspective either.
11-22-2015, 10:05 PM   #22
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With film you know each shot counts when you push the shutter button. with digital its just how much storage space.you have on the card... nearly as much as the time left in a month or until your finger gets a cramp from pushing the capture button. Then again it is how much battery do you have and if you have a spare or not. Digital is often lost because it is ephemeral in both what it is and how it is stored. Film negatives can last a lot longer than the person who put the images on them.

Thinking on the above makes me wish for Kodachrome again. Those positive slides will last more than a century with little degradation. But that's history.

Digital is amazing and good and the way of the present as well as the future. But....it is only another way....not the only way. Film has a nature all it's own and will always ......even after you can't buy any anymore.
11-22-2015, 10:51 PM   #23
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QuoteQuote:
... do you ever get annoyed not being able to see how the shot looked before developing?
No.

If I've been shooting digital for any length of time there is occasionally a subconscious urge to look at the (blank) back of the camera which I find humorous usually.
But... no.

11-23-2015, 05:15 AM   #24
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QuoteOriginally posted by gofour3 Quote
Waiting has never bothered me and is just part of the "shooting film" process.
I would have shared your philosophy and never moved to digital EXCEPT the advantages of digital for medical-student teaching were too much to pass up (esp. no need to burn through a whole roll if picture #1 is the one you need TOMORROW; the ability to ensure the picture you took of that specimen you now have to dissect to ribbons really was sharp enough and properly exposed), and once you have it the urge to use it everywhere becomes unavoidable.
11-23-2015, 06:55 AM   #25
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QuoteOriginally posted by pathdoc Quote
once you have it [digital] the urge to use it everywhere becomes unavoidable.
If I were starting out today, or lost all my film gear and had to start over, I would probably invest in a digital slr and use it exclusively, for purely economic reasons. If a full-frame digital slr came out that was price-competitive with film bodies (as smaller-sensor slrs indeed already are), I would probably switch, again for purely economic reasons. Irregardless, for me shooting new pictures is less of a concern (though I really enjoy it), as I have a truly vast bank of barely-explored negatives (or as my wife's photographer-friend would call it, a "photo-morgue"), and as I cull through (or 'glean') this bank/morgue, I re-discover the qualities that led me to take them in the first place, that I can now digitally recover.

People are drawn to photography for all kinds of reasons (the vast majority in complete ignorance of what this medium has historically been about as a cultural phenomenon), and the world is awash in trillions of photos, that number increasing exponentially day by day. However, if you want to try to find something new to say, or some kind of a personal angle in this medium, that is the hard thing. Maybe film will help in this kind of quest. Maybe it's irrelevant.

----

For those interested in a kind of pre-digital benchmark of photography as a cultural phenomenon (quite outside of 'fine-art photography'), I recommend reading Susan Sontag's collection of seminal essays, "On Photography", and examining the paintings especially of Francis Bacon and Gerhard Richter, and some of the earlier paintings of Sigmar Polke (before he branched out into other concerns).

Last edited by dsmithhfx; 11-23-2015 at 08:41 AM.
11-23-2015, 08:33 AM   #26
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QuoteOriginally posted by MadMathMind Quote
A little. What I miss more is not being able to review my settings. I find value in knowing the f-stop in particular, since it tells me about the auto-focus system a lot and helps me evaluate a lens' sharpness/flaws. I don't get that with film, unfortunately. For film, the shutter speed would be nice too, since then I can see how I'm doing without shake reduction and adjust shutter speeds accordingly.

If a shot is critical and I feel I can't live without it, I shoot it with both the digicam and the film cam. The film camera is strictly B&W, so it's not terrible to have a color perspective either.
There are plenty of cameras that record exposure information on the film. The Pentax MZ-S and 645n are among them. There's also the old "Exposure Record" notebooks. I have used a notebook to record settings for film-testing and studio stuff. I just try to get it right the first time or I use auto-bracket, also available on many film cameras including the SF1n. Anyway, I rarely go back and look at the settings afterward.
11-23-2015, 08:51 AM   #27
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For some strange reason I have more confidence that my shots turned out shooting film because I cannot see the image on the back of the camera. My wife always asks me after I hung up the negatived to dry how the images looked and I tell her the exposure and development we good but she always wants to know what the images looked like. And it does not matter if the roll is hers or mine she needs to see it right away. I can wait until they are dried and I am cutting them up an putting them away.

I have a friend who waits months and occassionaly a year until he gets around to develop the roll. That is less then immediate. Thirty three years of shooting prior to using my first DSLR so instant review was never part of my workflow. Sometimes it is really important to have and other times gets in the way of enjoying the shoot.
11-23-2015, 10:19 AM - 1 Like   #28
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Digital cameras taught me to worry that I had somehow missed the shot.
Film cameras taught me to take one shot and know that I had got it.
11-23-2015, 11:40 AM - 1 Like   #29
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QuoteOriginally posted by baldrob Quote
... do you ever get annoyed not being able to see how the shot looked before developing? As someone who hasn't used a film camera in twenty years I would think it would drive me nuts.
But you can "see your exposure" before you take the picture with film. It's called a one-degree spot meter. Learn to place your low values for each film you shoot which you can hone in after just a few test rolls with experience and soon you will know what the exposure looks like before you take the picture. And with BW film and most color negative film that is really easy due to the huge exposure latitude they have. And for composition, you don't need to chimp at all because you just looked the scene before you took the picture. Why do you need to see it twice, I wonder, unless it is fast action.

And then one day a light should come on after you measured enough shadows that you'll go, duh - I get it now, and soon you won't even need a light meter much at all for daylight exposures and negative film.

Last edited by tuco; 11-23-2015 at 11:52 AM.
11-23-2015, 12:11 PM - 1 Like   #30
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Inability to see outcome is a feature!

---------- Post added 11-23-15 at 12:12 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by tuco Quote
And then one day a light should come on after you measured enough shadows that you'll go, duh - I get it now, and soon you won't even need a light meter much at all for daylight exposures and negative film.
And you won't be complaining about the stiff MX speed dial xD
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