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12-19-2015, 08:32 PM   #16
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QuoteOriginally posted by disconnekt Quote
I'd rather spend $40-ish bucks on a used filter, a roll of film & developing it, than spending $200+ to convert my DSLR camera/get one that's already converted.
Don't convert a digital camera. Put a filter on the lens of a current one. You have an Oly e500 listed amongst your equipment.

One filter that is all you need!

12-19-2015, 08:55 PM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by lmd91343 Quote
Don't convert a digital camera. Put a filter on the lens of a current one. You have an Oly e500 listed amongst your equipment.

One filter that is all you need!
Someone please correct me if I'm wrong here, but I thought most DSLRs have a filter on the sensor that purposely filters out IR. The exception are the astrophotography purposed models like the Nikon D810A, Canon 5DS R, and the Pentax 645Z IR that have the IR filtration removed so that it can record in the deep red and IR ranges for astrophotography.

Just putting on an IR filter on a standard DSLR will not give you IR images. Correct?
12-19-2015, 09:40 PM   #18
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QuoteOriginally posted by Alex645 Quote
But it should work if it were a color neg...right?
no, colour negative film isn't IR sensitive either, so you're still no better off.
12-19-2015, 09:53 PM   #19
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QuoteOriginally posted by Digitalis Quote
no, colour negative film isn't IR sensitive either, so you're still no better off.
I didn't mean to get "real" IR. But you could manipulate, for example, the red channel and darken those tones while making green channels very light. Of course, if there are people in the shot, then it's a lot more work with masks. This would be a way of simulating an IR effect, but no, it's not IR because the film is mostly recording only some UV thru red.

12-19-2015, 09:56 PM   #20
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QuoteOriginally posted by Alex645 Quote
I didn't mean to get "real" IR. But you could manipulate, for example, the red channel and darken those tones while making green channels very light. Of course, if there are people in the shot, then it's a lot more work with masks.
Yes is is possible to do this, however it is an extremely cumbersome and laborious way of doing it - personally I advocate that people should spend more time outside getting photos rather than having to spend hours, cooped up inside trying to get an effect they do not posses the correct tools to obtain.
12-19-2015, 10:06 PM   #21
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QuoteOriginally posted by Alex645 Quote
Someone please correct me if I'm wrong here, but I thought most DSLRs have a filter on the sensor that purposely filters out IR. The exception are the astrophotography purposed models like the Nikon D810A, Canon 5DS R, and the Pentax 645Z IR that have the IR filtration removed so that it can record in the deep red and IR ranges for astrophotography.

Just putting on an IR filter on a standard DSLR will not give you IR images. Correct?
Just expect long exposures. As I recall from several years ago, when I used an unconverted K20 or K10. I'll try to recreate that tomorrow.

I posted a photo below from this morning on from my UNCONVERTED K3 at ASA 6400 1.8 seconds

Last edited by lmd91343; 12-20-2015 at 10:50 AM.
12-19-2015, 10:06 PM   #22
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QuoteOriginally posted by Digitalis Quote
Yes is is possible to do this, however it is an extremely cumbersome and laborious way of doing it - personally I advocate that people should spend more time outside getting photos rather than having to spend hours, cooped up inside trying to get an effect they do not posses the correct tools to obtain.
Completely agree! Some of the best digital IR I've seen were done with owners that just upgraded their cameras and no longer intended to shoot with their older model...and then had them converted for shooting IR. I was just trying to think of creative solutions for the OP that wanted IR-like results without shooting IR.
12-20-2015, 12:12 AM   #23
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QuoteOriginally posted by Alex645 Quote
Someone please correct me if I'm wrong here, but I thought most DSLRs have a filter on the sensor that purposely filters out IR. The exception are the astrophotography purposed models like the Nikon D810A, Canon 5DS R, and the Pentax 645Z IR that have the IR filtration removed so that it can record in the deep red and IR ranges for astrophotography.

Just putting on an IR filter on a standard DSLR will not give you IR images. Correct?
From what I read online, I think some earlier generations of DSLR's (Varying on the brand) had a slightly weaker IR filter on the sensor and were easier to use a IR filter on the lens. Nowadays you have to either convert it or buy a niche'd camera that already has it taken out/modified like the 810, 5DS R & 645Z IR.

12-20-2015, 05:48 AM   #24
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The k3 will happily take IR photos if you're willing to take really long exposures.

https://flic.kr/p/uL6exd
12-20-2015, 10:48 AM   #25
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Here is a picture I took this morning with my UNCONVERTED K3 at ASA 6400 1.8 seconds



You have to buy the filter anyway. Learn with the digital camera first. It is easier and faster to learn with. It is also cheaper. Then do the film.

Last edited by lmd91343; 12-20-2015 at 10:53 AM.
12-25-2015, 03:22 PM   #26
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If you have a black or deep red filter and
any of the super pan films and
a tripod
you can try for IR effects - white leaves
Ilford SFX, or even Fomapan 400
Waste a few frames bracket around one second /4 in full sun
Fomapan 400 is cheap and has a '60s grain signature
without a filter set the ISO to 250.
12-25-2015, 05:36 PM   #27
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With the near-IR films such as SFX, do you need to adjust the shutter speed?
12-25-2015, 05:46 PM   #28
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QuoteOriginally posted by clockworkrat Quote
With the near-IR films such as SFX, do you need to adjust the shutter speed?
no, if you are using the film without an IR filter, the cameras meter at ISO200 should be perfectly accurate. However, using the Hoya R72 filter reduces exposure by four stops.

Last edited by Digitalis; 12-25-2015 at 10:44 PM.
12-25-2015, 08:06 PM   #29
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QuoteOriginally posted by Digitalis Quote
no, if you are using the film without the an IR filter, the cameras meter at ISO200 should be perfectly accurate. However, using the Hoya R72 filter reduces exposure by four stops.
The R72 filter is so dark, some light meters will struggle with getting a reading (older FSLR meters). So if you can't get a reading, 4 stops less than ISO 200 is around ISO 12. On a sunny day according to the Sunny 16 rule, that would mean f/16 @ 1/15". No tripod? Then instead of f/16 @ 1/250" (closest whole EV approximation to ISO 200), or for sharpness f/8 @ 1/1000", but 4 stops more light and you'd be shooting at f/8 @ 1/60". Bracketing is always wise as your light meter is really designed to measure visible light, not IR.
12-25-2015, 10:18 PM   #30
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I have a Sears TLS (Re-badged Ricoh TLS) only goes to ISO 25, so going to ISO 12 (or even 6 like some sites are saying to do) really isn't an option.
I may just end up pushing the film to ISO 800 & have fun with it (want to be able to handhold it at f/8-16 range), since I'm going to end up paying an extra $2 bucks for the extra processing when I send it out to get it developed anyway.
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