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01-04-2016, 03:10 PM   #31
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I don't have a digital camera, 2 x K1000, 28, 35, 50, 120mm, mostly mono, bulk and cine.
Normally people at 2m.

01-04-2016, 03:11 PM   #32
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QuoteOriginally posted by RR84 Quote
In an age where photography has become so automated and convenient, why do you still choose to shoot fully manual vs AE, AF cameras? Is it nostalgia, an unwillingness to adapt to newer technologies, or perhaps something deeper than that?

If so, please mention which manual Pentax body if your preferred weapon of choice and why (SV, SP, KX, MX etc).
I shoot with a manual SLR because I have all the parameters under control, if the pic comes out wrong it's my fault, if it's good it's what I wanted to shoot and focus.

And the results are better: just ask film makers like JJ Abrams and the guys who shot Jurassic World...why do they use 35 mm? Tarantino also rejumped on the film bandwagon and resurrected the 70mm format.

For gear, I have too much, my favourites are the Canon F1N, Nikon F2A(S), Spottie F, LX and K2DMD.
01-04-2016, 04:32 PM   #33
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QuoteOriginally posted by RR84 Quote
Interesting that you brought this up. I'm a sound engineer by trade, and I can say that many similarities can be drawn between analogue recording and film photography. In fact, I wrote an article recently which touches on many of the points you raised above.


The same holds true for recording to tape; it still remains the most future-proof medium available. While digital recording formats have come and gone, a well-stored reel of tape will outlive the artists who recorded to it.


Sorry to hear about your loss Tony. It's easy to fall into the trap of thinking that art is getting better, just because technology is getting better. But in reality, it's not getting better; only more convenient.
I thank you for your comment. I feel what really is disappointing is that with all the research I did regarding this camera,
there was no mention of the issue regarding the Dynamic Range. I discovered that the reason there was no mention of it, is because all of the digital cameras of that era, had the same problem, so no one indicated there was a problem.
Rather peculiar I believe. No one appreciates being set up for surprises. Anyway, thanks again.

Tony
01-04-2016, 05:50 PM   #34
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QuoteOriginally posted by Cuthbert Quote
And the results are better: just ask film makers like JJ Abrams and the guys who shot Jurassic World...why do they use 35 mm? Tarantino also rejumped on the film bandwagon and resurrected the 70mm format.
Check out the movie "Carol", it was filmed in 16mm using four types of Kodak Vision3 daylight & tungsten movie stock. Cinematography wise it's the nicest looking movie that I have seen in years.

Phil.

01-04-2016, 10:56 PM   #35
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I shoot film mostly because I'm used to focusing manually on my film camera, compared to trying to focus manually on a Digital lens (especially since it's a mid-telephoto, more of a pain). Plus I don't shoot that much, so a roll of film pretty much does it for me when I feel the need to go out & shoot for a bit.
01-04-2016, 10:59 PM   #36
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QuoteOriginally posted by gofour3 Quote
Tarantino also rejumped on the film bandwagon and resurrected the 70mm format.
QuoteOriginally posted by gofour3 Quote
Check out the movie "Carol", it was filmed in 16mm using four types of Kodak Vision3 daylight & tungsten movie stock.
My favourite 70mm film is The Master (2012). It just looks beautiful.
01-04-2016, 11:47 PM   #37
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QuoteOriginally posted by Cuthbert Quote
I shoot with a manual SLR because I have all the parameters under control, if the pic comes out wrong it's my fault, if it's good it's what I wanted to shoot and focus.

And the results are better: just ask film makers like JJ Abrams and the guys who shot Jurassic World...why do they use 35 mm? Tarantino also rejumped on the film bandwagon and resurrected the 70mm format.

For gear, I have too much, my favourites are the Canon F1N, Nikon F2A(S), Spottie F, LX and K2DMD.
Film is the only medium Tarantino has ever used.
01-05-2016, 06:26 AM   #38
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QuoteOriginally posted by RR84 Quote
Great point, but not everyone sees it that way. Ask many of today's youths and they'll tell you precisely where to shove your limitations!

But I certainly agree with you. Constraints and art go hand-in-hand. To quote the great Orson Welles, "The enemy of art is the absence of limitations."
I quite agree about the youth of today...or any era, really.
Good quote, too.

---------- Post added 01-05-2016 at 09:28 AM ----------

Just stumbled across this article:

Why I've Gone Back Shooting Film and Why You Should Too

01-05-2016, 07:04 AM - 1 Like   #39
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QuoteOriginally posted by RR84 Quote
In an age where photography has become so automated and convenient, why do you still choose to shoot fully manual vs AE, AF cameras? Is it nostalgia, an unwillingness to adapt to newer technologies, or perhaps something deeper than that?

If so, please mention which manual Pentax body if your preferred weapon of choice and why (SV, SP, KX, MX etc).

I mostly use a KX, sometimes a Nikon F. I don't trust AF. I'm the one who has to be satisfied with the photograph, so I'm the one who has to be certain the subject is in focus. I will use AE for snapshots with my K2.

Last edited by AquaDome; 01-06-2016 at 07:34 AM.
01-05-2016, 08:04 AM - 2 Likes   #40
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There are two questions baked in:

Why shoot film? I love the texture and results. Sometimes it's subtle, sometimes it's in-your-face, but it's there. I don't have a digital preset to mimic Tri-X shot at ISO 1250 and developed in Diafine. There is both sparkle and grit, seemingly endless resolution within the rough clumps of silver....

Why shoot with a manual SLR? Sometimes automation of focus and exposure makes life easier -- I'd rather shoot a party with friends using a Nikon F100 or a digital SLR. But in most of my photography, I want to consciously choose every aspect of the photo. Aperture, shutter, ISO, focus. Nothing works as simply and quickly, with as much immediate feedback, as a good quality SLR. In 35mm my current choices are the LX and the K2. These machines are the pinnacle of evolution for manually-operated cameras, before the whole paradigm was thrown out to be reinvented because of the rise of electronics and the adoption of control-wheel interfaces. If you want to focus manually, you need a good viewfinder that effectively shows field of view, depth of field, and point of focus. The Pentax LX offers one of the best ever. If you want to set manual apertures, having aperture rings on your lenses makes good sense -- obvious tactile and visual feedback, on a big control that falls under your fingers. Shutter speed? Right there on the deck. Metering? The LX and K2 are perfect for displaying both the suggested exposure and the impact of your selected shutter speed/aperture on the exposure.
01-05-2016, 08:48 AM - 1 Like   #41
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Ever since Kodak, photography has been easy to do. Now it's easier than ever. There's a kind of satisfaction one gets from not taking all the modern shortcuts. So, strictly in terms of photography as a process, an activity, a journey, there are reasons for hanging on to the older methods. And the knowledge one gains this way will be useful even with the latest and greatest automated gear.

As to the photographs, the output: let's not talk about dynamic range and line pairs per millimeter, which scarcely matter for most of what most of us do. Let's not talk about meter-wide prints: how many of us will ever make a print that large? What's the actual final output you're aiming for? Film and digital sensors give different results. Yes, film and digital can be manipulated to give very similar results, but they generally aren't. There is a digital look, and a film look. The more I use film, the more I am in love with the film look, and the more I am left cold by the digital look. Personally, I want to get back to darkroom printing, something I've done very little of, and that long ago. I want something with more of an aspect of the handmade about it than a digital print. I don't really have room for an enlarger, so I'm planning to give contact printing a go, little 4x5 prints. I'll try some 6x17 contacts too. If I like the results, then maybe, just maybe, I will step up to larger formats. 8x10 with a half darkslide for 4x10, perhaps. Yikes.

I think the power of digital imaging is fantastic, I just don't care for where most people seem to want to take it. Digital is the reason I got back into photography. And I'm not going to drop color photography, nor online photo sharing, so digital will remain in my toolkit.

135 format: Pentax KX, Pentax MX. These are the cameras that got me back into film, but I'm not as interested in shooting 35mm right now.
120 format: Pentax 645n; Shen Hao 6x17 view camera. The 645n is auto-focus and auto-exposure, of course; I generally focus manually but I often use Av mode. I chose Pentax 645 in part for the 645D/Z option, but now I doubt I will go there. I love the 645n, just wish it were quieter.
large format: Arca-Swiss F-line 4x5. It's not so much about the large negatives as it is about image control.
01-05-2016, 11:02 AM - 1 Like   #42
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I have recently begun to shoot film partly out of curiosity, and since the price of entry is quite low. Now, I'm hooked. I find the experience of shooting is different from digital... the lack of instant feedback, the more deliberate camera control, the more forgiving nature of exposure on B/W film, and the tactile use of a mechanical film camera are all different enough that I consider them different experiences. And developing my own B/W film has turned out to be much more fun than I ever thought. Seeing images on a freshly developed roll film is quite a satisfying experience (and yes, I was surprised at my own success the first few times). I still have a lot to learn about developing and scanning, so right now my images are no where near as good as what I can get from digital, yet I'm still having fun.
01-05-2016, 04:15 PM   #43
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QuoteOriginally posted by fuent104 Quote
Film is the only medium Tarantino has ever used.
Not 70mm.

However if digital is better why many important directors still shoot film?

For instance the SW prequels (AOTC and ROTS, I think TPM was still shot on film) were the first movies made in digital and at that time they looked the best thing on screen ever happened, now they look like a sort of cartoon, the last SW movie is awful plot wise (a sort of bad remake of Episode IV) but everybody is crazy on the way it looks.

For me it's the same for still photography.
01-05-2016, 04:53 PM   #44
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^^ When's the last time you were watching a 'shot-on-digital' film and you exclaimed, "Wow! Look at that light!"
01-05-2016, 05:38 PM   #45
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The experience of getting Kodachrome slides back from Kodak has to be experienced to be fully appreciated. Holding a slide to the light and seeing a perfect miniaturization of the world you had viewed through the finder is fully rewarding. This actual thing you hold, was in the camera collecting the picture. Sadly Kodachrome is only a memory now, and E6 slide processing difficult find. That leaves colour print film as the closest way to mirror that experience. (I love B&W but have not got down to doing my own; the alternative is mailing it away, and it is very expensive. to process).
Also, the feel of those pre-automated, built to last, chrome and glass works of art are such a pleasure to hold. And you know, it is silly to say so, but I have the 'aesthetic cheating feeling' using a digital camera. Spray and pray just too easy..
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