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01-08-2016, 05:50 AM   #31
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QuoteOriginally posted by Cuthbert Quote
In Europe, especially old medieval town with narrow streets sometimes it's hard to get decent light to use consumer's grade colour like Gold 200 or Fuji 400, I have many pics taken with those and I gave up photographing in the 90s because my pics were...well boring. This is especially true in winter's time.
Interesting. Way back in the day I once saw a massive head-to-head assessment of all colour films available in the Australian market, and I still remember the remarks they made about one of the Agfa films (I think it was 100 ASA). They pointed out the VERY vibrant colours relative to just about everything else and theorised that this was because it had been designed to deal with relatively light-poor conditions in parts of Europe. And then to paraphrase "...so when it gets out into our sunny conditions it just goes wild..."

Me, I've decided to start pulling my Fuji and Kodak films. I only get good results in flash, which makes me think it's not getting enough light. Whether this is because the cameras I shoot it in are getting past their prime or the Canadian autumn/winter light is making things suck, I don't know - what matters is the result, which is not all the best or brightest. Current roll of Fuji 400 I just dropped into the MX, the camera has been set for 320 and we shall see what happens.

01-08-2016, 07:00 AM   #32
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QuoteOriginally posted by pathdoc Quote
Interesting. Way back in the day I once saw a massive head-to-head assessment of all colour films available in the Australian market, and I still remember the remarks they made about one of the Agfa films (I think it was 100 ASA). They pointed out the VERY vibrant colours relative to just about everything else and theorised that this was because it had been designed to deal with relatively light-poor conditions in parts of Europe. And then to paraphrase "...so when it gets out into our sunny conditions it just goes wild..."

Me, I've decided to start pulling my Fuji and Kodak films. I only get good results in flash, which makes me think it's not getting enough light. Whether this is because the cameras I shoot it in are getting past their prime or the Canadian autumn/winter light is making things suck, I don't know - what matters is the result, which is not all the best or brightest. Current roll of Fuji 400 I just dropped into the MX, the camera has been set for 320 and we shall see what happens.
Depends on how you meter, I'd try 200...
01-08-2016, 08:51 AM   #33
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QuoteOriginally posted by Alex645 Quote
...
There certainly are differences between tabular and cubic grain emulsions, but even when you compare a Delta 100 with a Delta 3200, doesn't the higher ISO stock have a larger exposure latitude?
Yeah, I've seen the exposure latitude defined on a film's characteristic curve. So in that regard you should get more latitude with a film that response faster to light.

On another note, I'll point out that some that radical highlight compression I do with with 100ACR @ EI 12 and 400TMY @ EI 50 is developer dependent. Reducing the film development time down by as mush as I do seems to work better with my staining Pyro developer then my others. And when it comes to pushing film or expanding highlights, my staining Pyro developer doesn't do that well at all compared to the others. So developers can be a real curve ball when trying talk about the behavior of films.
01-08-2016, 04:09 PM   #34
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QuoteOriginally posted by pathdoc Quote
Interesting. Way back in the day I once saw a massive head-to-head assessment of all colour films available in the Australian market, and I still remember the remarks they made about one of the Agfa films (I think it was 100 ASA). They pointed out the VERY vibrant colours relative to just about everything else and theorised that this was because it had been designed to deal with relatively light-poor conditions in parts of Europe. And then to paraphrase "...so when it gets out into our sunny conditions it just goes wild..."

Me, I've decided to start pulling my Fuji and Kodak films. I only get good results in flash, which makes me think it's not getting enough light. Whether this is because the cameras I shoot it in are getting past their prime or the Canadian autumn/winter light is making things suck, I don't know - what matters is the result, which is not all the best or brightest. Current roll of Fuji 400 I just dropped into the MX, the camera has been set for 320 and we shall see what happens.
This is the kind of light you can find in wintertimes on Swiss, Bavarian and Austrian Alps:



Take into account that your eye gets used to the blue light so it doesn't look like that when you can take the pic (LX, M85mm, Agfa Precisa).



This is taken with Gold 200 in a narrow street in Northern Italy, as you notice in places like you are almost always in the shadow, and IMO this shot would have worked better in B&W but still it would have been very difficult to meter as one part is overexposed the other strongly underexposed.

01-08-2016, 05:36 PM   #35
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QuoteOriginally posted by Cuthbert Quote
This is the kind of light you can find in wintertimes on Swiss, Bavarian and Austrian Alps:



Take into account that your eye gets used to the blue light so it doesn't look like that when you can take the pic (LX, M85mm, Agfa Precisa).



This is taken with Gold 200 in a narrow street in Northern Italy, as you notice in places like you are almost always in the shadow, and IMO this shot would have worked better in B&W but still it would have been very difficult to meter as one part is overexposed the other strongly underexposed.
Some kind of warming filter will help get rid of the blue cast. I've always used a skylight filter when shooting colour slide film, or you can do more warming with a "cloudy" filter.

Phil.
01-08-2016, 06:08 PM   #36
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QuoteOriginally posted by gofour3 Quote
Some kind of warming filter will help get rid of the blue cast. I've always used a skylight filter when shooting colour slide film, or you can do more warming with a "cloudy" filter.

Phil.
I usually use a warming filter, but not with slide because I find E6 warm "enough", the second shot is taken with a skylight filter, I'm sure about it.

On the other side this is a good exposure with E6:



But I was on the top, while the "blue pic" is taken at the button of the valley, just to show how light can change and film behaves differently.

This is also Gold but it's taken in a flat country (England) and in summertime, Ok the light is a little harsh you can see how the colours "pop up" in comparison to the Porsche pic:

01-08-2016, 11:30 PM   #37
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For monochrome I like Tri-X for fast film and Neopan 100 Acros for normal. For slide film I use any of the Velvia varieties but like 50 the best. I don't shoot negative color film.
01-09-2016, 03:24 AM   #38
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For 400 speed colour my favourite film is Fuji 400H. Expensive, grainier than Portra 400, but really nice colours. For 400 B&W I prefer Kodak Tri-X or T-Max to HP5+.

For slower colour films I haven't found anything I really like in 35mm. Fuji 160NS is amazing but only available in 120. For slower B&W film m favourite is FP4+, but Acros & T-Max 100 are also very nice.

01-09-2016, 10:27 AM   #39
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QuoteOriginally posted by Cuthbert Quote
I usually use a warming filter, but not with slide because I find E6 warm "enough", the second shot is taken with a skylight filter, I'm sure about it.

On the other side this is a good exposure with E6:



But I was on the top, while the "blue pic" is taken at the button of the valley, just to show how light can change and film behaves differently.

This is also Gold but it's taken in a flat country (England) and in summertime, Ok the light is a little harsh you can see how the colours "pop up" in comparison to the Porsche pic:
I've never used that Agfa slide film, but checking the web shows it leans towards a blue cast:

Deep blue skies and amazing x-pro capabilities - this is why Agfa CT Precisa 100 is one of the all-time classics! This 35mm slide film produces delightfully vibrant colors without being too overpowering and casts beautiful blue tones to your image. Discover why its a Lomographer's favorite.

I've shot all over the world in all possible lighting conditions with various Kodak/Fuji slide film and have never seen a slide with that much blue.

Phil.
01-09-2016, 11:31 AM   #40
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QuoteOriginally posted by gofour3 Quote
I've never used that Agfa slide film, but checking the web shows it leans towards a blue cast:

Deep blue skies and amazing x-pro capabilities - this is why Agfa CT Precisa 100 is one of the all-time classics! This 35mm slide film produces delightfully vibrant colors without being too overpowering and casts beautiful blue tones to your image. Discover why its a Lomographer's favorite.

I've shot all over the world in all possible lighting conditions with various Kodak/Fuji slide film and have never seen a slide with that much blue.

Phil.
The current Agfa Precisa if repackaged Fuji Provia 100F. AFAIK.
01-09-2016, 02:01 PM   #41
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QuoteOriginally posted by Swift1 Quote
The current Agfa Precisa if repackaged Fuji Provia 100F. AFAIK.
I heard it's Sensia...however for sure it's some sort of Fujichrome and the only E6 I shoot in 35mm because it's relatively cheap in Europe.
01-10-2016, 05:25 AM   #42
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QuoteOriginally posted by gofour3 Quote
I've never used that Agfa slide film, but checking the web shows it leans towards a blue cast:

Deep blue skies and amazing x-pro capabilities - this is why Agfa CT Precisa 100 is one of the all-time classics! This 35mm slide film produces delightfully vibrant colors without being too overpowering and casts beautiful blue tones to your image. Discover why its a Lomographer's favorite.

I've shot all over the world in all possible lighting conditions with various Kodak/Fuji slide film and have never seen a slide with that much blue.

Phil.
It is trivially easy to correct a blue (or any colour) cast digitally, whether globally or e.g. only shadows.
01-10-2016, 07:42 AM   #43
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QuoteOriginally posted by dsmithhfx Quote
It is trivially easy to correct a blue (or any colour) cast digitally, whether globally or e.g. only shadows.
What's the point of shooting with film if you have to correct things digitally?
01-10-2016, 08:26 AM   #44
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QuoteOriginally posted by Cuthbert Quote
What's the point of shooting with film if you have to correct things digitally?
The process of shooting itself? I just finished my first roll of film in a k1000 and I plan on scanning them and digitally tweek them if need be. I don't see how that contradicts film shooting.
01-10-2016, 08:28 AM   #45
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QuoteOriginally posted by Cuthbert Quote
What's the point of shooting with film if you have to correct things digitally?
There is no "have to".
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