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01-10-2016, 08:31 AM   #46
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QuoteOriginally posted by Cuthbert Quote
What's the point of shooting with film if you have to correct things digitally?
Digital did not create post processing nor does it own the rights to it. Just different tools.

To be sure, shooting film and digitizing the results is not the same as shooting digital camera.

01-10-2016, 09:22 AM - 1 Like   #47
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In my darkroom I always endeavored to make "straight" prints with as little sleight-of-hand as possible.
A little burning or dodging maybe, but I even shied away from extreme paper grades.
If too much was required to "save" an image I'd usually lose interest.
I'd also occasionally push a roll of film, but only when forced, with mixed results.

Properly exposed and developed negatives always made things easier, so that became my aim.

In the brave new world of digital IMO a little simple tweaking is fine.
But Photoshop offers such powerful tools too many manipulate the image (digital mainly but also film)
to a point where it bears little resemblance to the actual scene originally photographed.

Chris
01-10-2016, 10:55 AM   #48
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QuoteOriginally posted by Cuthbert Quote
What's the point of shooting with film if you have to correct things digitally?
That's the reason I shoot slide film, so I don't have to scan them. I'd rather view my slides on a projector or light table than on a PC. (The only slides I scan are the ones I post on this forum)

As a result shooting with a good slide film and filters are your only real option. I always use a Skylight/Polarizer for regular sunny days, a warming filter (I have a couple grades of warming) for cloudy/blue sky days and a cooling filter for morning/evening shooting when there is too much red/orange/brown light. I also have filters for shooting daylight film inside with no flash.

If the colour temperature of the shooting light is not what the film wants to see, then you can get funky results.

Phil.
01-10-2016, 11:48 AM   #49
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You could do minor color balancing of a print form a negative that was off when doing it the old-school way. You did it while setting the C-M-Y filters on the enlarging head. When I made color prints from color negatives with my gear, I was the only one saying if the color was correct. I hand no machine to tell me that it was good. And a well color balanced negative did not mean I'd get a well color balanced print. It was trial and error, slow and laborious often to get a good color print. I'd guess at a C-M-Y settings and make a print, let it dry, look for color casts and guess at what new C-M-Y setting and the amount that would correct that. No fun. Big labs have a calibrated machine that automatically does that much like pushing the auto color balance button in software on a digital file. Sometimes that works and sometimes not so well. A lot depends on what colors and/or neutral colors are in the scene.

Then I finally got a semi-automatic color analyzer to help me but you had to make a bunch of prints that you picked one as "correct color" and then set the analyzer to use that as a reference for each film you used. That improved my output but still often required multiple attempts. Then my enlarger's lightbulb brunt out. The new replacement bulb meant I had to go through that long, dreaded recalibration process again. Making color prints was not nearly as fun as doing BW prints where selecting different grades of paper, their warmth, textures and toning was all part of how you'd express your final vision.


Last edited by tuco; 01-10-2016 at 01:35 PM.
01-10-2016, 11:55 AM   #50
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QuoteOriginally posted by dkevin Quote
I am re-entering the world of 35mm and I need some recommendations for 35mm film (brand and speed). I have K1000 cameras and am taking most (if not all) of my photos outside in the less-than-sunny beautiful Northwest US. I am trying to learn how to scan and edit my own pictures. So, I guess my question is, what brand of film do you prefer for shooting? I probably will not enlarge the pictures beyond 8x10. I don't know if I have provided enough information in order to allow suggestions to be made...if not, let me know what I have left out and I will fill in the blanks...Thanks for your help!

For B&W, since you live in the N/W, I'd say go with either Ilford's Delta Pro 400 or Kodak's Tmax 400

If you're going to do long exposures, go with Fuji Neopan 100 Acros. You can go up to 2 minutes without any exposure compensation, and up to 16 1/2 minutes with a 1/2 stop of exposure compensation due to reciprocal failure

For color, Kodak's Portra seems to be popular.
01-10-2016, 01:02 PM   #51
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QuoteOriginally posted by tuco Quote
You could do minor color balancing of a print form a negative that was off when doing it the old-school way. You did it while setting the C-M-Y filters on the enlarging head.
Before I started digital, I was doing Type-R color prints (from slides) and discovered using the additive system of RGB with slides for easier color matching more successful than CMY with color negs. With CMY you had one light source with subtractive filters, but with RGB you had three light sources and three shorter exposure times. My use of the word "easier" is relative, and the process was still arduous if you cared about getting the color balance correct.

But....when you got it right, the Ilfochromes exceeded the color and saturation (and fade resistance) of anything I've ever worked with to date.
01-10-2016, 01:40 PM   #52
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QuoteOriginally posted by Alex645 Quote
Before I started digital, I was doing Type-R color prints (from slides) and discovered using the additive system of RGB with slides for easier color matching more successful than CMY with color negs.
I was going to head into that direction as I wanted to start shooing slides more but eventually just gave up on color and focused on doing my BW for doing-it-yourself.
01-10-2016, 02:02 PM   #53
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QuoteOriginally posted by Cuthbert Quote
What's the point of shooting with film if you have to correct things digitally?
How do you know your scans are correct in the first place?

01-10-2016, 02:33 PM   #54
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Anybody who shoots film is going to do some PP, even if they get a shot perfect. Exactly how much PP is done will vary from person to person.
01-10-2016, 11:28 PM   #55
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I've enjoyed scanning Velvia slide film in recent years. I send it out for development and if I need large prints for an exhibition I have that done professionally too. But in the mean time I've enjoyed the process of coming up with some pretty good LR profiles for each variety of Velvia that greatly simplifies things. The nice part about slide film is that it's pretty easy to have the developed film on the light table right next to my computer and then just tweak things in LR until the image on my monitor looks like the image on the film. Much easier than negative film, especially color negatives. This allows me to enjoy the images on my computer, upload them to my online gallery, and share them with others. Of course I lose significant detail in the darkest areas when digitizing, but still find the results to be acceptable, even pleasing at times.

---------- Post added 01-11-16 at 03:31 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by Cuthbert Quote
What's the point of shooting with film if you have to correct things digitally?
I also thoroughly enjoy the experience of shooting film. It slows me down and pushes me to be more deliberate. I know I could work just as slowly and deliberately with digital photography but it just feels different, in a fun way, to work with film.
01-11-2016, 02:30 AM   #56
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QuoteOriginally posted by disconnekt Quote
Anybody who shoots film is going to do some PP, even if they get a shot perfect. Exactly how much PP is done will vary from person to person.
When I shot weddings with Kodachrome 25, prints on cibachrome never, did more than a white balance with two dimension step wedge balance grid.
Mono street candits almost never straight print.
So it is the context rather than the person.
Fill in flash or bridesmaid with large reflector.
01-11-2016, 11:54 AM   #57
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I don't know if the OP is still around or has been scared off! My reading of his question is that he's after a bit of advice on some film to try to get his hand back in with shooting and see how it goes.

So for my 2p... just get started. If you're worried about light levels being low then get 400ISO, as a K1000 will have enough ways to reduce exposure to cope with even sunny days. Plan a few tests to get a handle on how the camera performs/how the pictures look, so try a few different exposure settings on the same subject, think about fill flash if you like, but make notes on each frame so you can check it out later. Experiment, and feed it back in to the next film.
01-11-2016, 04:24 PM   #58
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Hi There...

Yes, the original poster is officially befuddled...I suppose that's what I get for asking such a broad question. I am getting back into 35mm color C41 film and I wondered what film was popular for a K-1000. I have been out of taking pictures for the last 8 yrs or so and I feel like Rip VanWinkle. Costco is no longer in the film developing business. It seems my options have narrowed to mail-order developing or ???. Before I fell asleep, I was using Fuji 200 ...it was usually good enough for the un-sunny Northwest. I see that Kodak and Fuji still make/sell consumer grade 35mm film...anybody else? I view most of the posts with perplexity and amusement...They're pretty far above me...I suppose that one day the light may come on and I will clue into what they're talking about...but for now...I'm just looking for a path back into the game....
01-11-2016, 04:40 PM   #59
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There are still plenty of choices for fast C-41 color films.
ISO 400 speed film might be better for subdued light.

Kodak Ultramax 400 is a budget priced film good for everyday use - if you can find it.
Kodak Portra 400 is excellent, but more expensive.

Chris
01-11-2016, 04:41 PM   #60
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Welcome back! If I could generalize, I do believe Fujifilm color negative film handles overcast and muted light better than Kodak. You must've been using Fuji 200 for a reason before, so I'd suggest staying with it but going to a 400 ISO to make exposures easier (faster shutter speeds or smaller apertures). Above 400 and you'll be compromising grain, color, sharpness, etc.

IF you can find out what C-41 chemistry is used at the lab you are going to send it to, I'd go with that brand (Kodak or Fuji). All brands are compatible but are optimized with their own emulsions and chemicals.

Sorry that we all go off on tangents, but unless we hear back, we create our own issues.
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