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01-11-2016, 04:59 PM - 1 Like   #61
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QuoteOriginally posted by ChrisPlatt Quote

Kodak Ultramax 400 is a budget priced film good for everyday use - if you can find it.

Chris
I have no clue about local sources, but I order mine from B&H. I think it has gone up to $2.19 a roll. Outrageous!

01-11-2016, 11:46 PM   #62
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QuoteOriginally posted by Alex645 Quote
Sorry that we all go off on tangents, but unless we hear back, we create our own issues.
So true!
01-12-2016, 01:25 AM   #63
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Like John on page 1 I've been using Agfa Vista Plus which in the UK you can get for 1 (about 70 cents) from Poundland, and while I doubt I'd try to shoot someone's wedding with it, when it's developed by a good lab, the results are easily good enough for me. I think the quality is now more in the developing and printing than the film really - I'm sure there are variations in the umpteen types but I certainly don't have a handle on what or which I prefer.

In terms of printing, our local Asda (Walmart UK) produces distinctly unimpressive prints, but a good mail order service (the high street is no more I'm afraid, with the odd exception) makes ones with the same film and lens look pretty special. You could do with recommendations on developing - which state/town are you in?
01-12-2016, 09:14 AM   #64
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QuoteOriginally posted by dkevin Quote
I am re-entering the world of 35mm and I need some recommendations for 35mm film (brand and speed). I have K1000 cameras and am taking most (if not all) of my photos outside in the less-than-sunny beautiful Northwest US. I am trying to learn how to scan and edit my own pictures. So, I guess my question is, what brand of film do you prefer for shooting? I probably will not enlarge the pictures beyond 8x10. I don't know if I have provided enough information in order to allow suggestions to be made...if not, let me know what I have left out and I will fill in the blanks...Thanks for your help!
A man after my own heart. I started with digital in 2000. About five years ago I realized how much I missed film. Developing it, the craft. And making images has become so diluted in value because of the ubiquitous of digital. Now, everyone with a spare $500 is a photographer. Not that they could tell you what an F stop is. I don't mean to denigrate those who are masters with digital, just speaking of the hoi paloi.

And you should see the looks and comments I get with the film rigs. The noisy shutter, the noisy film winder, the size. Ha ha.

And then there's putting my 1960's Honeywell Strobonar "potato masher" flash on my little Minolta digicams. Back to the future.

Best film? As much as I love making my own developers, and developing traditional B&W, I've found the best all around films are in the color negative class. The hardest part might well be finding a place to develop them! Of course, I develop C-41, too, but sometimes not convenient.

Why C-41 color? First, despite the long history as low quality consumer films, you'd be surprised what they actually do with the technologies of the last 20 years. ISO 400 films are finer grained that ISO 100 conventional B&W. Second, they scan much easier than silver based films, although I've never had much issue with a small range of scanners I have. Third, you can get B&W or color, obviously. No more carrying two camera bodies like my father had to.

I used to teach a class, "Preserving Your Family's Photographic Heritage." I'm editing and putting the handouts together into an online book..........any day now............... I'd be happy to send you the chapter "How to Become a Scanmeister in One Hour" if you want. Or, anyone else. Warning: The style and font was selected to be used as a paper handout. I'm redoing my pages into a more e-friendly format, but this chapter hasn't been done yet. Just send me an email directly, please: paulv You Know What paulv.net .

The chapter is all about scanner settings and pre-scan corrections that are needed so often with highly variable quality images, such as many family ones, or time altered.

---------- Post added 01-12-16 at 10:21 AM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by dkevin Quote
Great suggestions all! I used to use Fuji 200 color (C-41?) and was happy with the results. I understand the sentiment of loading up and just shooting...but I wondered if there were better options available. I am planning on sending the film out for developing at a quality lab (open to suggestions here too!) and having the negatives returned without lab scans/CD etc. I guess I got used to the cheap Costco developing/printing and when it went away, I parked my 35mm stuff. However, there seems to be more options than I first thought (self-scanning and fine-tuning) and I am re-entering the pool...one toe at a time. I bought an Epson V500 scanner for a real good price and am gonna start with the negatives I currently have. Eventually I will scan my own developed negatives ( if I like my own work) and have them printed by a decent lab.
If you are only developing to negatives, any place will work just fine. Think of all those one hour joints of yore, designed to be operated by people who knew nothing about photography. Even if the film were to not be developed perfectly, you could probably compensate in the scan or subsequent image work.

01-12-2016, 10:13 AM   #65
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"making images has become so diluted in value because of the ubiquitous of digital."

Betchoo just hated brownies-instamatics-polaroid-p+s too? All those saddoes with shoeboxes full of (spit) snapshots of their families and birthdays and weddings and vacations? And all they had to do was push a button!

Jeesh, you give one idiot a camera, and they all want one rant grumble complain
01-12-2016, 10:58 AM   #66
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QuoteOriginally posted by paulvzo Quote

Think of all those one hour joints of yore, designed to be operated by people who knew nothing about photography. Even if the film were to not be developed perfectly, you could probably compensate in the scan or subsequent image work.
Although there were One Hour labs operated by people who knew little about photography, when I was in the industry, many of us were actually over-qualified for the job. My first boss/manager was a graduate of Brooks Institute of Photography and worked on the side with large format cameras. I was a UCLA Film School graduate hired by a cinematographer who ended up working with Fujitsu in Minnesota. We spent weeks of training with Noritsu over everything from color theory to trouble shooting both C-41 and RA-4 processing, testing using a MacBeth densitometer, charting and calibrating daily, etc.

Like the green auto everything mode on DSLRs, you could do the same with the equipment, but most of us prided ourselves in individual frame corrections and pre-video preview screens, developed an eye for looking at a color negative and knowing on the first try how to correct the CMY and density for an ideal color balance. There was a back side printer that puts that data on every print. If you ever saw "N N N N" on the back of your print, that meant Costco or Walmart put zero correction into your print and the operator was either lazy, negligent, or untrained.

The gimmick of the One Hour photo did create an illusion that it was all technological automation, but in reality Dr. Frome and Noritsu created a franchise of custom minilabs, and the smart consumers understood that the local franchise was only as good as the employees and management that ran it. I spent many hours back in the 80's educating photographers what they did wrong or what they could do to improve their results.
01-13-2016, 08:21 AM   #67
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QuoteOriginally posted by dsmithhfx Quote
"making images has become so diluted in value because of the ubiquitous of digital."

Betchoo just hated brownies-instamatics-polaroid-p+s too? All those saddoes with shoeboxes full of (spit) snapshots of their families and birthdays and weddings and vacations? And all they had to do was push a button!

Jeesh, you give one idiot a camera, and they all want one rant grumble complain
I'm not sure what your point is. Mine was about the value, both perceived and financial of images when film was king and now.

Polaroids, Brownies, whatever, all used film. Inherently expensive to replicate. Once upon a time we might have gotten an envelope in the mail with prints from a family member. Open it, let's see! Now, we get hundreds of emailed or internet based images to look at every month. Speaking of my own family experience, and I'm sure I'm not alone. Oh, yes, I do review them, and am grateful for them, but I almost feel obligated to spend the time to do so.

Then there's what a commercial picture user is willing to pay. For many web creators and even book publishers, an image is worth $0.00. Maybe a quarter. Why? Dilution of value now that "everyone is a photographer" and they upload their thousands of flowers, sunsets, and kittens. Yes, there are still some fee for image stock agencies, but I'm sure they struggle.

BTW, I've had cameras since 1952, so no one just gave me a camera.

---------- Post added 01-13-16 at 09:23 AM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by Alex645 Quote
Although there were One Hour labs operated by people who knew little about photography, when I was in the industry, many of us were actually over-qualified for the job. My first boss/manager was a graduate of Brooks Institute of Photography and worked on the side with large format cameras. I was a UCLA Film School graduate hired by a cinematographer who ended up working with Fujitsu in Minnesota. We spent weeks of training with Noritsu over everything from color theory to trouble shooting both C-41 and RA-4 processing, testing using a MacBeth densitometer, charting and calibrating daily, etc.

Like the green auto everything mode on DSLRs, you could do the same with the equipment, but most of us prided ourselves in individual frame corrections and pre-video preview screens, developed an eye for looking at a color negative and knowing on the first try how to correct the CMY and density for an ideal color balance. There was a back side printer that puts that data on every print. If you ever saw "N N N N" on the back of your print, that meant Costco or Walmart put zero correction into your print and the operator was either lazy, negligent, or untrained.

The gimmick of the One Hour photo did create an illusion that it was all technological automation, but in reality Dr. Frome and Noritsu created a franchise of custom minilabs, and the smart consumers understood that the local franchise was only as good as the employees and management that ran it. I spent many hours back in the 80's educating photographers what they did wrong or what they could do to improve their results.
I did not mean to imply that all lab operators were drones. Sorry. I know otherwise and you prove that many were very skilled photographers and operators. Especially if within a camera store.

Yet, I think my comment is mostly true, especially for the Walmart/Walgreens general caliber of folk.
01-13-2016, 09:37 AM   #68
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QuoteOriginally posted by paulvzo Quote
I'm not sure what your point is.
You might find this book amusing:



QuoteQuote:
"You press the button, we do the rest." Kodak used this slogan in ads for the first box cameras, introduced by George Eastman in 1888. From then on, virtually anyone could take pictures--the snapshot was born! Without exception, the amateur photos presented in Snapshots: The Eye of the Century capture what are essentially ordinary moments--yet every trace of banality disappears once they are removed from the context of personal biography. Sometimes the moment is right, and art just "happens," in the form of double or multiple exposures, slipped horizons, or curious details that enter the picture frame because the camera moved just as the shutter was released. Christian R. Skrein-Bumballa, an artist and a former professional photographer, has tracked down and collected thousands of these treasures, which can be viewed as part of our visual heritage. His impressive selection of photographs is here arranged thematically, and at its heart we find the essentials of the human condition: joy and pain, visualized in the decisive moment in which history stands still for a fraction of a second. Snapshots features the most aesthetically notable and otherwise curious photographs from the S.A.S. Snapshots Archiv Skrein, a collection of nearly one million snapshots from all over the world.


01-14-2016, 12:27 AM - 4 Likes   #69
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I don't think the machines and methods used to make images has that much effect on the quality of the output. Once cameras became affordable for the masses there were lots and lots of terrible pictures. The total number of images has increased due to digital and the introduction of more type of cameras, often embedded in other devices. Now days, just like before, once in a while a completely casual photographer will come up with a winner, but in general, the quality of images is related to the basic disciplines of photography and the mind/effort of the photographer.

As I was growing up I was never impressed with my dad's photos, even though he took a lot. They tended to be group photos on specific occasions and photos related to his work. But after he died I began digitizing his older stuff and discovered some real treasures. Seven years before I was born my parents moved from the U.S. to Japan as missionaries. What I've discovered is that in the first 10 years or so his photos of Japan were really good. I can only guess that it was his curiosity and fascination with encountering a new culture, a new society and a new people. By the time I was grown up he had lived in Japan long enough to get used to it so his photographic creativity suffered. I only wish I could have gone thru his older stuff while he was still alive. Here are a few of my favorites.
01-14-2016, 12:59 AM   #70
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QuoteOriginally posted by revdocjim Quote
I only wish I could have gone thru his older stuff while he was still alive. Here are a few of my favorites.
Thanks for sharing the link. Incredible sharpness, tonal range, and wonderful light.

My mother is Japanese, but my father was not into photography so there are lots of faded 35mm Agfachrome and Ektachrome with a few square monochrome prints from what I believe was 127 film. Nothing in terms of quality like your father's images, but enough to get a sense of time and place.

Amazing how the world has changed. My father is now 93 and he recently shared with me (for the first time) how frustrated he was in trying to understand me and my generation in the 60's/70's, and now is completely alienated from his grandchildren as they become adults.

I do believe one reason some of us value legacy glass and film is because it ties us to the past; our roots.
01-14-2016, 08:32 AM   #71
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QuoteOriginally posted by revdocjim Quote
I don't think the machines and methods used to make images has that much effect on the quality of the output. Once cameras became affordable for the masses there were lots and lots of terrible pictures. The total number of images has increased due to digital and the introduction of more type of cameras, often embedded in other devices. Now days, just like before, once in a while a completely casual photographer will come up with a winner, but in general, the quality of images is related to the basic disciplines of photography and the mind/effort of the photographer.

As I was growing up I was never impressed with my dad's photos, even though he took a lot. They tended to be group photos on specific occasions and photos related to his work. But after he died I began digitizing his older stuff and discovered some real treasures. Seven years before I was born my parents moved from the U.S. to Japan as missionaries. What I've discovered is that in the first 10 years or so his photos of Japan were really good. I can only guess that it was his curiosity and fascination with encountering a new culture, a new society and a new people. By the time I was grown up he had lived in Japan long enough to get used to it so his photographic creativity suffered. I only wish I could have gone thru his older stuff while he was still alive. Here are a few of my favorites.
Yeah the shots your dad took are really good, like the IR work!

Thanks for posting!

Phil.
01-14-2016, 09:44 PM   #72
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QuoteOriginally posted by revdocjim Quote
I don't think the machines and methods used to make images has that much effect on the quality of the output. Once cameras became affordable for the masses there were lots and lots of terrible pictures. The total number of images has increased due to digital and the introduction of more type of cameras, often embedded in other devices. Now days, just like before, once in a while a completely casual photographer will come up with a winner, but in general, the quality of images is related to the basic disciplines of photography and the mind/effort of the photographer.

As I was growing up I was never impressed with my dad's photos, even though he took a lot. They tended to be group photos on specific occasions and photos related to his work. But after he died I began digitizing his older stuff and discovered some real treasures. Seven years before I was born my parents moved from the U.S. to Japan as missionaries. What I've discovered is that in the first 10 years or so his photos of Japan were really good. I can only guess that it was his curiosity and fascination with encountering a new culture, a new society and a new people. By the time I was grown up he had lived in Japan long enough to get used to it so his photographic creativity suffered. I only wish I could have gone thru his older stuff while he was still alive. Here are a few of my favorites.
Those from your dad are excellent. Capturing the moment is a major aspect of photography.
01-14-2016, 10:07 PM   #73
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QuoteOriginally posted by revdocjim Quote
As I was growing up I was never impressed with my dad's photos, even though he took a lot. I only wish I could have gone thru his older stuff while he was still alive. Here are a few of my favorites.
Treasures to enjoy!
01-14-2016, 10:57 PM   #74
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Thanks to all who took the time to look at some of my dad's photos. One of my dreams is to get them published in book form some day... Alas, it doesn't appear to be happening any time soon.
01-15-2016, 12:41 AM   #75
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Have you ever self-published a book? I don't know how customs would work in Japan, but I've used blurb.com (San Francisco) and they are excellent. You have the option of just creating books for yourself, or you can have it listed privately on their site, or even listed on Amazon with an ISBN number. You decide the price and how much profit per book. Soft bound, hard bound, different quality papers, different sizes, and even eBooks which can have embedded videos or audio.

It is time consuming, especially with text and captions and layout, but it's a great keepsake and I would think there would be a specialty market very interested in the images of the era your father photographed. Here's my latest which also previews the entire book that I edited and created last year. It's a compilation of photography from 16 students and 3 chaperones and myself for 3 days on Kauai:

Punahou-Kaua?i Photo Trip | Photo book preview | Blurb Books
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