Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
04-18-2016, 09:40 AM - 1 Like   #46
Site Supporter
stevebrot's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Vancouver (USA)
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 27,294
QuoteOriginally posted by TaoMaas Quote
When you could buy a good camera body and not have to upgrade for decades.
...and the camera just kept working, year after year after year after year.


Steve

04-18-2016, 10:41 AM   #47
Veteran Member




Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 483
QuoteOriginally posted by gaweidert Quote
That would have been Fairlawn, NJ. Processing Kodachrome was not like processing any other film. It required custom made processing equipment. There were only a few places in the world where it was done. All Kodachrome processing for Europe was done in Spain.

Kodachrome had no color dyes in the film itself. Instead, color pigments were added to the individual color layers during the processing cycle. These pigments were extremely stable and the reason why old Kodachrome slides still look so good after sitting for decades in less than optimal storage conditions to downright awful storage conditions.

So if you have any old Kodachrome laying around your darkroom, just treat it like a B&W film and have some fun with it.
The European processing moved around before finally being sent to Dwanes, via Switzerland
For a while it was processed at box 14, Hemel Hempstead,...

I've been in the Hemel factory while it was intact. Alas gone now.

If you are really keen you should be able to process it yourself it merely needs three steps of processing ie one for each layer, as well as a rem jet removal, hard work.
04-18-2016, 05:30 PM   #48
Loyal Site Supporter




Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Rochester, NY
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 2,148
QuoteOriginally posted by Xmas Quote
The European processing moved around before finally being sent to Dwanes, via Switzerland
For a while it was processed at box 14, Hemel Hempstead,...

I've been in the Hemel factory while it was intact. Alas gone now.

If you are really keen you should be able to process it yourself it merely needs three steps of processing ie one for each layer, as well as a rem jet removal, hard work.
It is a lot more complicated than that if you are going to process several roles. You have to be able to maintain the pigment concentration of the developing solutions as they get used up when processing and you have toe replenish them accordingly. Kodachrome film manufacturing and processing was a dark art that never was able to be completely computerized. The people who did it were real wizards.

Many years ago a Kodak manager had the bright idea that these people were not longer needed and anybody could do it. The old timers were laid off and took retirement packages. Suddenly over half of the film going out the door did not meet spec and the pros were screaming bloody murder because customers were suddenly rejecting their work. A new VP was appointed and he pulled the plug on the coating lines, begged the old times to come back as consultants to get thing right and pass on their knowledge. Then he hit the road to apologize to the pro photographers and beg them to be a little more patient. It took six weeks to get things right again. Since Kodak always operated with a six week film stock buffer a lot of people in high places were very concerned as things were worked out. It was a major embarrassment involving their banner product.

I actually worked on a project where a Kodak developed a "minilab" to process Kodachrome. It worked pretty good too. It was an attempt to keep the product going as studio professionals used a lot of it, but amateur use dropped pretty fast once Fuji coming out with their false color reversal films. Professional nature photographers went for Fuji Velvia too. Velvia had absolutely horrible color reproduction characteristics, but it had a strong emotional appeal. People went for it big time. I remember thinking about all those years of striving to reproduce colors accurately and Fuji come along with a false color film that blew all that work away.

Think of it this way. The first time you look at the Grand Canyon in real life you go WOW!. Then you look at your Kodak "True Color" photographs when you get back home and go. Yep. That's the Grand Canyon alright,

Another person goes to the Grand Canyon for the first time and goes WOW! Then that person uses Fuji Velvia to capture the scenery. But the Fuji film has a color pallet designed to intensify everything. So he gets the film back and projects it on the screen and goes WOW! That's exactly how I remember it. In reality the intense colors are all wrong, but they evoke the same emotions that they saw when they were there. It was a brilliant move by Fuji that recognized the emotion behind a photograph rather than the technical accuracy of it.
04-18-2016, 06:16 PM   #49
Pentaxian
ChrisPlatt's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Queens NYC
Posts: 4,826
I never liked the Fuji slide films. I shot slides for many years, but none at all since
the demise of Kodachrome. My Pakon scanner can't even handle mounted slides.

Chris

04-19-2016, 09:40 AM   #50
Veteran Member




Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 483
QuoteOriginally posted by gaweidert Quote
It is a lot more complicated than that if you are going to process several roles. You have to be able to maintain the pigment concentration of the developing solutions as they get used up when processing and you have toe replenish them accordingly. Kodachrome film manufacturing and processing was a dark art that never was able to be completely computerized. The people who did it were real wizards.

Many years ago a Kodak manager had the bright idea that these people were not longer needed and anybody could do it. The old timers were laid off and took retirement packages. Suddenly over half of the film going out the door did not meet spec and the pros were screaming bloody murder because customers were suddenly rejecting their work. A new VP was appointed and he pulled the plug on the coating lines, begged the old times to come back as consultants to get thing right and pass on their knowledge. Then he hit the road to apologize to the pro photographers and beg them to be a little more patient. It took six weeks to get things right again. Since Kodak always operated with a six week film stock buffer a lot of people in high places were very concerned as things were worked out. It was a major embarrassment involving their banner product.

I actually worked on a project where a Kodak developed a "minilab" to process Kodachrome. It worked pretty good too. It was an attempt to keep the product going as studio professionals used a lot of it, but amateur use dropped pretty fast once Fuji coming out with their false color reversal films. Professional nature photographers went for Fuji Velvia too. Velvia had absolutely horrible color reproduction characteristics, but it had a strong emotional appeal. People went for it big time. I remember thinking about all those years of striving to reproduce colors accurately and Fuji come along with a false color film that blew all that work away.

Think of it this way. The first time you look at the Grand Canyon in real life you go WOW!. Then you look at your Kodak "True Color" photographs when you get back home and go. Yep. That's the Grand Canyon alright,

Another person goes to the Grand Canyon for the first time and goes WOW! Then that person uses Fuji Velvia to capture the scenery. But the Fuji film has a color pallet designed to intensify everything. So he gets the film back and projects it on the screen and goes WOW! That's exactly how I remember it. In reality the intense colors are all wrong, but they evoke the same emotions that they saw when they were there. It was a brilliant move by Fuji that recognized the emotion behind a photograph rather than the technical accuracy of it.
Really keen ... Hard work ...

But I used Kodachrome for 30 years exclusively and yes Fuji was different but I never believed the colours of either were 'real',

Colours are subjective things.

I did prefer Kodachrome though, when they stopped 25, I switched to Fuji, and single coated lenses.
04-19-2016, 09:55 AM   #51
Site Supporter
gofour3's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Vancouver, Canada
Posts: 5,299
Ferrania is supposed to be releasing six versions of their new E6 film in 135, 120 and two movie formats:

For market strategy reasons, the first film produced by FILM Ferrania will be a color reversal film in the following speeds: 64D, 100D, 200D, 400D, 640T, 800/3200T.

The first film will be initially available in only 4 standard formats: 135 and 120 for still photography, as well as Super8 and 16mm (30m spool core and 122 meters) for motion pictures.


Nice to have another choice now than just Fuji, though I have to say Provia 100F is pretty good. Still would prefer to be shooting E100G, but I guess Kodak is out of the E6 game for good.

Phil.
04-19-2016, 04:05 PM   #52
Pentaxian
ChrisPlatt's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Queens NYC
Posts: 4,826
It's still vaporware. FILM Ferrania has yet to market a single emulsion.

Chris
04-20-2016, 07:11 AM   #53
Veteran Member




Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 483
QuoteOriginally posted by ChrisPlatt Quote
It's still vaporware. FILM Ferrania has yet to market a single emulsion.

Chris
Sure they are on the ropes taking punches but they are still ducking and weaving.
Dispatches from the LRF-The CINE 8-16 Interview

04-20-2016, 07:36 AM   #54
Site Supporter
gofour3's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Vancouver, Canada
Posts: 5,299
QuoteOriginally posted by Xmas Quote
Sure they are on the ropes taking punches but they are still ducking and weaving.
Dispatches from the LRF-The CINE 8-16 Interview
Yeah I think it will happen, I have supported them so I get some freebies when they start production. (six rolls if I remember correctly)

Phil.
04-20-2016, 08:21 AM   #55
New Member




Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 12
QuoteOriginally posted by ChrisPlatt Quote
28, 50, and 135.

Chris
Exactly the kit I'm assembling now for my Eric-rejuvenated K1000 bodies! Only the 135mm is missing.

---------- Post added 04-20-16 at 08:37 AM ----------

My Kodachrome 64 mailers always went to an address on Manor Way in Dallas. I often just drove over there and dropped them off!
04-20-2016, 01:16 PM   #56
Site Supporter
stevebrot's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Vancouver (USA)
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 27,294
QuoteOriginally posted by ChrisPlatt Quote
It's still vaporware. FILM Ferrania has yet to market a single emulsion.

Chris
Yeah...they have been spending the seed money I gave them on beer.


Steve
04-20-2016, 01:48 PM - 1 Like   #57
Veteran Member
Nesster's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: NJ USA
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 13,047
QuoteOriginally posted by stevebrot Quote
Yeah...they have been spending the seed money I gave them on beer.


Steve
better than beer money on weed.

---------- Post added 04-20-2016 at 04:51 PM ----------

Ah the old days... here's what it took


A sample page from a zine, Nowak's Photographic Magazine. "This solo effort by the Woody Allen of photography is brilliant and funny as hell. In long-hand, spiral bound, in a printing of 100 copies, it comes out, unpredictably, twice a year. No back copies. Unique and bawdy." is the review in The Photography Catalog.

Still good advice: How to become a Photographic Superstar:
Acceptable 35mm cameras: Very New Canon F2. Old black Nikon F, with a lot of brass showing through the black (sandpaper if necessary). Black-taped Leica M-2. Two Dented Pentaxes, with leather coming unglued. Nikon SP.

PROP BOX - No photographer who ever made it big neglected this all-important piece of equipment. When ideas just won't come, the prop box will save your skin again and again. The contents of top photographers' prop boxes are remarkably similar:

1) BROKEN DOLLS
2) GAS MASK
3) BRA, GARTER BELT, and NYLONS
4) VAMPIRE BLOOD
05-13-2016, 02:30 PM   #58
New Member




Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 14
QuoteOriginally posted by OldPentaxFan Quote
Remembering to pull the dark slide and then remembering to put it back in place.
Remembering if you had already exposed that sheet of film/frame yet or not - when in doubt, advance
05-13-2016, 03:48 PM   #59
Pentaxian
ChrisPlatt's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Queens NYC
Posts: 4,826
QuoteOriginally posted by GarageBoy Quote
Remembering if you had already exposed that sheet of film/frame yet or not - when in doubt, advance

For 35mm film I have always found rewinding the leader of the exposed roll completely into the cassette helps avoid confusion.

Chris
05-13-2016, 04:08 PM   #60
Site Supporter




Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Photos: Albums
Posts: 63
Using as little leader as possible to thread the film and guessing how many extra shots you could squeeze from a roll of film.
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
adox, advance, asa, beer, box, chris, copies, days, film, money, nikon, phil, photography, pm, post, prop, roll of film, superstar
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The good old days? Lenscap Pentax Film SLR Discussion 31 11-09-2015 03:42 PM
Travel Scent of magnificence in old days Hiro Post Your Photos! 4 12-09-2014 06:54 AM
Streets The Good Old Days wildman Post Your Photos! 16 03-20-2010 06:55 PM
What was it like in the good old days? Damn Brit Photographic Technique 68 09-27-2008 08:42 AM
Back to the old days JCSullivan General Talk 12 01-20-2008 09:46 AM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 06:59 PM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top