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06-09-2016, 08:50 AM   #16
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QuoteOriginally posted by tuco Quote
I find it the same as loading 135 canister on SS reels
Once you get the technique down, both are easy. Due to the width of the 35mm film and the relative stiffness because of it (compared to 120/220 film which is wider) I have found there is less chance of buckling the film while loading it compared to the 120. However, 35mm film is a little trickier than 120 because of its length. If the film was not lined up on the reel correctly, then it starts to skew on the reel. Just technique that you really need a feel for (as I am sure you know) 'cause you certainly can't see what you're doing!

Regards,

06-09-2016, 10:01 AM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by BigDave Quote
Once you get the technique down, both are easy. Due to the width of the 35mm film and the relative stiffness because of it (compared to 120/220 film which is wider) I have found there is less chance of buckling the film while loading it compared to the 120. However, 35mm film is a little trickier than 120 because of its length. If the film was not lined up on the reel correctly, then it starts to skew on the reel. Just technique that you really need a feel for (as I am sure you know) 'cause you certainly can't see what you're doing!

Regards,
on a related note...

Do you find Stainless or Plastic Reels easier to use? I recall liking the plastic ones for 35mm but my memories are very faint. It has been a long long time.
06-09-2016, 10:12 AM   #18
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QuoteOriginally posted by BigDave Quote
Once you get the technique down, both are easy. Due to the width of the 35mm film and the relative stiffness because of it (compared to 120/220 film which is wider) I have found there is less chance of buckling the film while loading it compared to the 120. However, 35mm film is a little trickier than 120 because of its length. If the film was not lined up on the reel correctly, then it starts to skew on the reel. Just technique that you really need a feel for (as I am sure you know) 'cause you certainly can't see what you're doing!

Regards,
Yes, after 35 years of developing my own BW film I know what the the technique is like. And about everything I do developing my film is much different than what people do here.
06-09-2016, 01:57 PM   #19
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QuoteOriginally posted by UncleVanya Quote
Do you find Stainless or Plastic Reels easier to use? I
I have always preferred the SS reels, though I have worked with both. The plastic are hard to dry and can hold dried chemistry if you are not careful. SS cleans easily. The only downside with SS is DON'T DROP THEM. If you do, the reel bends and then you can't get the film in easily, or at all. They get relegated to doing photograms and other Art projects!

06-11-2016, 07:59 AM   #20
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QuoteOriginally posted by BigDave Quote
I have always preferred the SS reels, though I have worked with both. The plastic are hard to dry and can hold dried chemistry if you are not careful. SS cleans easily. The only downside with SS is DON'T DROP THEM. If you do, the reel bends and then you can't get the film in easily, or at all. They get relegated to doing photograms and other Art projects!
I'm wanting to put my developing kit together. I want to go with SS as well, and a tank that won't leak. Is there anyone place where most people buy tanks, SS, chemicals, etc?
06-11-2016, 10:34 AM   #21
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Freestyle Photo in LA is well known for having alot of Darkroom & film related products

Tanks, reels, pretty much anything & everything darkroom related products
Darkroom | Freestyle Photographic Supplies

Developer, Fixer, Stop Bath, etc.
Chemicals | Freestyle Photographic Supplies
06-11-2016, 11:11 AM   #22
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QuoteOriginally posted by disconnekt Quote
Freestyle Photo in LA is well known for having alot of Darkroom & film related products

Tanks, reels, pretty much anything & everything darkroom related products
Darkroom | Freestyle Photographic Supplies

Developer, Fixer, Stop Bath, etc.
Chemicals | Freestyle Photographic Supplies
I gave them a call this week and found out they're in S. California. I'm in California, so I would like to find a place where I'm not paying extra in state taxes or shipping. However, if they're the best, I'll go with them.

Thanks
06-11-2016, 12:41 PM   #23
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You're pretty much going to have to pay for shipping on any site when you're going to order anything online. Some sites won't charge for shipping, but that's only if you order over a certain amount.

As far as taxes go, a majority of places don't add tax, but it'll vary from site to site (and where the main store is located).

06-11-2016, 09:27 PM   #24
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QuoteOriginally posted by glee46 Quote
and a tank that won't leak
A SS tank with a plastic/rubber top has always worked well for me. You always get a little chemistry dropping in the sink (you do the processing OVER the sink, yes?) but it is the nature of the beast. If you break or loose a top, they can be easily replaced.
11-03-2016, 09:59 PM   #25
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QuoteOriginally posted by glee46 Quote
I watched a video on them. Nice! The price is high, but as the saying goes, "Time is Money" The few I saw on Ebay were between $100 to $300. More to think about for sure.
Just got a 35U on Ebay at 50/$60, so I can process and scan a dozen or more old films I've found around the house. The total cost with chemicals will probably be more than getting them developed professionally but I want to control the process myself, and I may well find more old films anyway. It's 20 years since I did any home developing, C- 41 temperature control could be fun!
11-04-2016, 07:12 AM   #26
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I have found that a fish tank heater works well. Set up a small tub of water near the temperature at which you need the chemicals, but a little cool. Set the fish tank heater in the tub and set it so it just turns on. Watch the temperature and keep raising it a little at a time until the appropriate temperature is reached. Then, take your chemistry bottles and place them in the water. Wait about an hour and the chemicals will all be at the proper temperature. You could even process in such a water bath to keep the chemistry from cooling down during the processing. It takes a little time to get the temperature bath stabilized, but it works well and it is low cost!
11-04-2016, 07:53 AM   #27
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Thanks for the tips, I will definitely practice temperature control as you suggest, before doing any actual processing!

One question though, is it best to err on the side of (very slight) coolness rather than over-heating, assuming the same developing time? If the main effect would be low contrast negatives, I might be able to correct that in software after scanning into my computer?
11-04-2016, 01:30 PM   #28
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The key with color is going to be consistent temperature. Changing temperature can cause color casts. The tank heater should keep you within a degree or less, which is needed in color. Just test the bath with a GOOD thermometer that you have tested on its own and calibrated. You should be fine from there.
11-06-2016, 09:31 AM   #29
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Thanks for all the helpful comments. Sadly I don't have any B&W undeveloped film to practice with, nor do I have a working SLR camera any more. But I keep finding more unprocessed C-41 films around the house so by the end I will be well practiced. Have been testing different volume water baths and I can achieve and maintain 38C to within half a degree for over 5 minutes even without topping up, and no water heater. My two digital clinical thermometers are very useful at that temperature.

My 'new' vintage 35U seems to be in good working order, is undamaged and seems very easy to use, though I don't yet have the chemicals. To simplify matters, I am thinking of ordering initially a digibase pre-diluted solution 3 x 500 ml C-41 kit but as I intend to process initially only one film a day, I don't know how long the solutions will remain usable (if stored in sealed 500ml bottles). A month would be fine, but will they last that long?
11-06-2016, 11:50 AM   #30
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QuoteOriginally posted by BigDave Quote
I have found that a fish tank heater works well.
I have used that approach for a tempering bath and it works well.


Steve
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