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06-14-2016, 09:14 AM   #31
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Contrast adjustment and pixel shift and the like are secondary to just getting a good scan of a flat slide, or rather flat negative in this case.

The film needs to be flat. I can see even from the photo of the rig that maybe it is not. I'm not clear what you're using to secure the film at the end of the rig, but a used plastic slide mount may do the job - file off the nubbins so it does not close completely allowing you to slide the film through it as you work.

Ideally you want a neutral scan that matches what you see in the negative under a loupe, erring on the side of flat (aka lower contrast than the original). As others have said - increasing the amount of source light will help so that you can ideally tighten the aperture to around F8 - F11. A diffused flash will work, or one of the many small/slim lightpads/light-tables available these days.


Last edited by chickentender; 06-14-2016 at 09:21 AM.
06-14-2016, 09:18 AM   #32
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QuoteOriginally posted by chickentender Quote
To my eye the DSLR scan is quite soft (and I'm assuming that's just a straight export from the raw unprocessed image) and as if the negative was not flat - seems to be some distortion. Which one matches the contrast and details of your negative under a loupe? That's what I'd look at.
What scanner did your lap use and what resolution is the emailed file? It looks to have a large amount of USM applied and obviously more contrast. Those are two very, very different images to me.
I just started shooting film for the 1st time using a K-1000 & ME Super. My focusing skills are not quite up to par even though I've used manual lens on DSLR's which gives a beep when in focus. These are film strips and it would be better if I had them in the cardboard which was used in the old days. I need to try and order some.

The finished pictures which were sent to Dropbox were Jpegs, The only info I found in the metadata was Noritsu Koki - EZ Controller. The size was 2048x3089.

I'm sure most of the softness is due to user error and from some tips here, I'm sure in a few weeks I'll have most of the kinks worked out.

By the way, what does USM stand for?

---------- Post added 06-14-16 at 09:24 AM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by dcshooter Quote
Looks like you are out of focus on your shot, partially stemming from the unevenness of the slide surface.

Also, taking a look at the pics of your rig, it appears you are using a standard 55mm f/2 Takumar? If so, you'll probably get much better results around the edges with a flat field dedicated macro lens.
The out of focus is user error. However, I need to find a way to get a tighter fit so that there is no "unevenness" onto the slide surface. Maybe the cardboard which use to come with the negatives, or thin glass. I definitely need to work on that.

I have a Pentax 50mm f/4 Tak Macro on the way. So that should help, I hope.

---------- Post added 06-14-16 at 09:27 AM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by chickentender Quote
Contrast adjustment and pixel shift and the like are secondary to just getting a good scan of a flat slide, or rather flat negative in this case.
I think the Pixel shift would make a difference and I'm going to give that a shot today.
06-14-2016, 09:56 AM   #33
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QuoteOriginally posted by glee46 Quote
By the way, what does USM stand for?
It stands for Unsharp Mask, the proper name for sharpening in post-processing.

Sharpening Using an Unsharp Mask


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06-14-2016, 10:00 AM   #34
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It definitely takes some "massaging" to dial in a dSLR scan setup. You'll get there.
USM is "unsharp mask", aka sharpening. Sounds like they were lab-scanned with a Noritsu. Every scanner will apply some amount of sharpening and curve & color adjustment, usually with profiles for the given film, or just a lab tech that knows what they're doing with a more high-end scanner. My point is that the lab scans will not be a "neutral" scan of your film but will have in effect been "post processed" a good bit to make the scan more like what they assume you were going for or characteristic that paticular film would exhibit. You DSLR-scanned RAW images will still need some amount of PP in most cases.

---------- Post added 06-14-16 at 10:06 AM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by glee46 Quote
I think the Pixel shift would make a difference and I'm going to give that a shot today.
It could, but it won't matter much until you get a proper flat film surface for a good shot first. What aperture are you shooting/scanning at? Your best bet for sharpness and proper detail, especially if the film isn't completely flat, is to stop down your aperture and increase your DOF as well as IQ.

06-14-2016, 11:34 AM   #35
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USM is one of several different sharpening strategies (e.g. high pass filtering, deconvolution, etc.) that can be used, so I wouldn't exactly call it the "proper" name for it.

QuoteOriginally posted by stevebrot Quote
It stands for Unsharp Mask, the proper name for sharpening in post-processing.

Sharpening Using an Unsharp Mask


Steve
06-14-2016, 12:44 PM   #36
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QuoteOriginally posted by dcshooter Quote
USM is one of several different sharpening strategies (e.g. high pass filtering, deconvolution, etc.) that can be used, so I wouldn't exactly call it the "proper" name for it.
You are correct and I stand corrected. More properly, it is the proper name for a commonly-used sharpening strategy and is also the name for a long-lived Photoshop filter used for sharpening. For many folk, "USM" is another way of saying "sharpening" and may safely be taken as such in other than more advanced technical discussions.


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06-14-2016, 01:27 PM   #37
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Cheers. I felt I had to take exception, since I am a photographer who actually prefers other methods to USM. We do exist!

QuoteOriginally posted by stevebrot Quote
You are correct and I stand corrected. More properly, it is the proper name for a commonly-used sharpening strategy and is also the name for a long-lived Photoshop filter used for sharpening. For many folk, "USM" is another way of saying "sharpening" and may safely be taken as such in other than more advanced technical discussions.


Steve
06-14-2016, 01:47 PM - 1 Like   #38
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QuoteOriginally posted by dcshooter Quote
Cheers. I felt I had to take exception, since I am a photographer who actually prefers other methods to USM. We do exist!
I'm not picky...I just use the sliders in Lightroom, though recently have been paying more attention to the fine points of doing so.


Steve

(...feeling grateful to have Martin Evening's Lightroom book with its excellent chapter on sharpening and noise reduction.)

06-14-2016, 01:53 PM   #39
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QuoteOriginally posted by stevebrot Quote
I'm not picky...I just use the sliders in Lightroom, though recently have been paying more attention to the fine points of doing so.


Steve

(...feeling grateful to have Martin Evening's Lightroom book with its excellent chapter on sharpening and noise reduction.)
I genuinely love Lightroom... have used it more and more since the first version and these days I open Photoshop perahps 5-10 per year.
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