Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
07-29-2016, 04:48 PM   #16
Site Supporter
stevebrot's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Vancouver (USA)
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 26,627
QuoteOriginally posted by elho_cid Quote
The main difference is panchromatic vs silver halide. That's the choice you need to make.
I don't believe the two are mutually exclusive. Were you thinking chromogenic as opposed to traditional silver-based image?


Steve

07-29-2016, 05:59 PM   #17
Pentaxian




Join Date: May 2011
Location: Santa Cruz, CA
Photos: Albums
Posts: 1,990
QuoteOriginally posted by John Elger Quote
Hey,

I shoot an analog BW from time to time and I would like to ask you what difference can I expect from different film manufactures?
If that were not enough, you will also have to consider the effect of the great variety of developers have on these films. What a great journey to look forward to . . .
08-16-2016, 08:09 AM   #18
Pentaxian




Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: North Bohemia
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 1,095
QuoteOriginally posted by LaHo Quote
I see that you live in Prague. Then Fomapan would be a no-brainer for me. Foma films are much cheaper than Ilford and Kodak when you live in Czechia and can yield some very pleasant results. I have had a few films with production faults (scratches) in them, but when taking pictures with an old Mamiya, it somehow fits the look. At other times such scratches can be a nuiscance. Still - you can shoot much more if you stick with Foma films. BTW, Bé Foto, Janovského 5 is cheaper than Skoda Foto.

I like the old-fashioned look of Foma films, here Fomapan 200 Creative:

Camera: Mamiya C330 Professional
Lens: Mamiya-Sekor 65mm F3.5
Exposure: 1/500 @ F5.6 (Y2 filter and rubber lens hood)
Film: Fomapan 200 Creative dev. in Compard R09 Spezial
I'M from Czechia ans Fotoskoda is rally not a cheap strore.

I use Fomapan 135 200 or 100 and stock Foma developer, fixer with Pentax MX and I might have some scratches but it might be my messy procesing.

I haven't scanned a lot but here are Foma samples https://www.flickr.com/photos/82601786@N03/albums/72157653558672198
08-16-2016, 10:45 AM   #19
Veteran Member




Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 433
QuoteOriginally posted by AldaCZ Quote
I'M from Czechia ans Fotoskoda is rally not a cheap strore.

I use Fomapan 135 200 or 100 and stock Foma developer, fixer with Pentax MX and I might have some scratches but it might be my messy procesing.

I haven't scanned a lot but here are Foma samples https://www.flickr.com/photos/82601786@N03/albums/72157653558672198
I've used Fomapan 100 & 400 135, bulk and 120 from '05 without any problems and I need to use a film squeegee as I live between to chalk streams the furthest 5km.

Temper better than 1C and water stop.

08-17-2016, 12:01 PM   #20
Pentaxian




Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Seattle
Posts: 7,017
No one has mentioned cubic grain vs tabular grain BW films. You can expect difference there both in look and feel and how fine the grain is for an equivalent box speed rating. That was a big deal and generated much controversy, mostly among sheet film users, when the tabular grain was introduced if I recall correctly.

Last edited by tuco; 08-17-2016 at 12:07 PM.
08-18-2016, 04:43 AM   #21
Veteran Member




Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 433
QuoteOriginally posted by tuco Quote
No one has mentioned cubic grain vs tabular grain BW films. You can expect difference there both in look and feel and how fine the grain is for an equivalent box speed rating. That was a big deal and generated much controversy, mostly among sheet film users, when the tabular grain was introduced if I recall correctly.
Confirmed if you want fine
Panf, Delta 100, Tmax100 last two tabular

If you want coarse

HP5+, Tx, Foma400

All three cubical though the Tx is finer grain
08-18-2016, 05:54 AM   #22
Pentaxian




Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Seattle
Posts: 7,017
QuoteOriginally posted by Xmas Quote
If you want coarse

HP5+, Tx, Foma400
Yes, and if you want course, develop your film in Rodinal
08-18-2016, 12:00 PM   #23
Veteran Member




Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 433
QuoteOriginally posted by tuco Quote
Yes, and if you want course, develop your film in Rodinal
Confirmed Fomapan 400 is nice in Rodinal.

08-24-2016, 05:48 PM   #24
Veteran Member
PGillin's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: South Florida, USA
Photos: Albums
Posts: 337
Well, as has been said it's a good idea to stick mainly to one film (or perhaps two, one faster and one slower) until you know it well, then begin experimenting.
The foma films in ISO 100 and 200 (especially the 200) I've found to be quite good, and I like them a lot. However, in the 400+ range Ilford is the best choice. Tri-X is already grainy at 400 and is not useful pushed to 1600 or above. I shot 100's of feet of it when I started with film, and was usually displeased with the results in low light.
I changed then to Kentmere 400 to save some money, found it to be better at 800 and 1600 ISO, although tri-x is nicer at 400.
The real winner, though, is Ilford delta 400. Nice, fine grain, good tones, and strong contrast.
So, perhaps you would find Foma 200 to be a good daylight film and Ilford delta to be a good product for low-light.
Hopefully that helps, there are already many good answers here and taken together they should be very useful.
08-25-2016, 03:21 AM   #25
Pentaxian
Jonathan Mac's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Madrid, Spain
Posts: 4,108
I like Tri-X at 1600, though I admit it's the only film I've tried at that speed. HP5+ (of which I understand Kentmere 400 is a cheaper version) is already too grainy and low contrast at 400.
08-25-2016, 05:08 AM   #26
Pentaxian
aurele's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Paris, France
Photos: Albums
Posts: 2,926
QuoteOriginally posted by John Elger Quote
Hey,

I shoot an analog BW from time to time and I would like to ask you what difference can I expect from different film manufactures? I'm used to shoot Ilford film but my local camera store offers there three brands (Ilford, FOMAPAN and Kodak). Are there any differences? Talking about the same ISO.

Thank you very much.
Best regards,
Jan Elger
If you scan your film, the "base" on which the sensitive layer is put will have some influence :
- The ilford film remain flat, and don't curl, which is great when you scan.
- the Kodak tend to curl.
- I don't know the foma, never tried.

About the iso : read the spec sheets of film, you can find some details like "400 iso film, better shot @320 for contrast" for example.

So far, with the shop processing (in Paris, we do have a very good photographic shop, that do process really well film), between the kodak and the ilford film, the best @1600 and 3200 remain Delta 400. It's less contrasty and offer more latitude when scanning. The HP5 and FP4 when push, are like the kodak : very contrasty, grain quite visible (but this contribute to a sens of sharpness and detail, IMO).

As some said, the best thing to do, is try them all You'll notice some differences, and only by seeing them yo will be able to decide what you like. You won't know what you may like, until you see it.
11-25-2016, 08:36 AM   #27
Forum Member
John Elger's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Prague, Czech Republic
Posts: 84
Original Poster
Ok thank you all for a lot of great and helpful advice I didn't expect so much response. I finished shooting my whole trip on Kodak Tri-X and I'm more or less satisfied by the results. Nonetheless I'd like to try shooting some HP5 in the future. But now with such erudite debaters as are here on pentaxforums I'd like to ask a few more questions.

1. What does it mean when film curls while scanned?
2. What reasonably priced film negative scanner would you recomend for home purchase?
3. What developing chemicals would you recomend? (I still use Kodak tri-x but wanting to try HP5+ and delta 100.
4. I'm planning to shoot project with working title "straight from 1930's 40's" and I would like to ask if there's any type of film on the market that has not changed since than. I've discovered that for example tri-x was introduced in 1954.

Thank you very much.
11-25-2016, 09:32 AM   #28
Site Supporter




Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Michigan
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 2,107
QuoteOriginally posted by John Elger Quote
and I would like to ask if there's any type of film on the market that has not changed since than.
Ilford FP4 dates back to 1935 acording to wiki.
Here is one taken in FP4 in 1980 with the ME Super and the -M 1:2 50mm
https://app.box.com/s/6m616czwq1ckp1gwnxdx3w7rctmr2acy

Welcome to ILFORD PHOTO
11-25-2016, 09:56 AM   #29
Site Supporter
gofour3's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Vancouver, Canada
Posts: 5,194
QuoteOriginally posted by John Elger Quote
4. I'm planning to shoot project with working title "straight from 1930's 40's" and I would like to ask if there's any type of film on the market that has not changed since than. I've discovered that for example tri-x was introduced in 1954.
Rollei and Adox make some interesting "experimental" b&w films that would be good for you project.

Phil.
11-25-2016, 05:06 PM   #30
Site Supporter
ChrisPlatt's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Queens NYC
Posts: 4,688
Ilford FP4 was likely reformulated when it became FP4+ (Plus) in 1990.
Kodak Tri-X has been reformulated numerous times since it was introduced.

Some BW films from smaller EU manufacturers are closer to older formulas.
There are also ways to achieve a more classic look with modern materials.

Chris
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
film, ilford, time
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Kodak slide films kxjiru Pentax Film SLR Discussion 10 11-07-2014 02:24 PM
Kodak Discontinues slide films :( twitch Pentax Film SLR Discussion 14 04-03-2012 02:20 PM
Bad news for MF: Kodak discontinues colour reversal films veraikon Pentax Medium Format 12 03-09-2012 10:39 AM
Kodak TMax 400 or Ilford XP 2 Super mccarvindh Pentax Medium Format 13 02-07-2012 05:36 PM
MX & Ilford shots (1280x817), discuss: T-grain/delta films. CSoars Pentax Film SLR Discussion 6 12-10-2008 01:26 AM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 12:08 AM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top