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07-30-2008, 06:26 PM   #16
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QuoteOriginally posted by germar Quote
Nice thread, thanks to all who offered me guidance on this. Hopefully, I will soon post some results.

Anyone know of a publication (or better yet a website) for beginners wanting to process with limited space/storage? I figure it's gonna be a simple Tri-X setup, but that would be an interesting start.

Regards and thanks!

germar
By the way, I too will begin with Tri -X as far as developing goes.

07-30-2008, 11:48 PM   #17
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Ugh I can't find the site I was looking for. It showed steps on how to develop in your kitchen sink.

The author used a plastic tub filled with water. The chemicals and tank were submerged in the water, which was heated using a fish tank heater. When everything was at the right temp, it was time to start mixin...

I really wish I could find it...maybe someone else has it bookmarked?
07-31-2008, 12:20 AM   #18
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The kitchen sink is a great place to develop film, the first step that nees to be carried out in total darkenss, or in a changing bag is loading the film into the spirals of the developing tank.
I prefer to do this in a dark closet (or lately in the "under-the-stairs" pantry).

Then in the kitchen sink
1. Prepare your chemicals (follow instructions), is you have to dilute a liquid concentrate first check that the water temperature is fine, then add the concentrate.
2. Fill your dev tank with enough developer. Start the clock
3. Agitate and then Tap the bottom of your tank to dislodge air bubbles
4. Agitate in the intervals suggested (1 prefer to do it once/minute but most people do it twice/minute)
5. When dev time is about to end (20-30 seconds before) dump the developer
6. Fill the tank with stop bath / water agitate vigorously and dump
7. Fill the tank with fixer, agitate and start the fix-clock
8. Dump the fixer
9. Fill tank with water, agitate and dump
10. Fill tank with water, agitate for 30sec and dump
11. Fill tank with water, agitate for 30 sec, wait 1 minute, agitate and dump
12. Fill tank with water, agitate for 30 sec, wait 5 minutes, agitate and dump (Repeat once)
13. Open the top, use distilled water or water with LFN/Phtoflo and cover the film
14. Hang the film to dry.

If you have nothing to develop film check freestyle, they have an "all-in" kit for about $50 that includes dev tank, mixing stuff, thermometer and even chemicals to start with.
07-31-2008, 12:53 AM   #19
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Well done with the instructions. I want to add little detail. Before drying the film remove excess liquid. Sometimes not everything roll down leaving a small drop of liquid. That will leave a mark and rewashing will not get rid of them. Squeeze can scratch the film. Good alternative is to run down the film with two streched fingers instead of squeeze. Use of Photoflo will reduce the friction during the process.



07-31-2008, 05:35 AM   #20
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QuoteOriginally posted by Nico Quote
Well done with the instructions. I want to add little detail. Before drying the film remove excess liquid. Sometimes not everything roll down leaving a small drop of liquid. That will leave a mark and rewashing will not get rid of them. Squeeze can scratch the film. Good alternative is to run down the film with two streched fingers instead of squeeze. Use of Photoflo will reduce the friction during the process.

I do not squeeze the film, I use a salad spinner to centrifuge most of the water out
07-31-2008, 06:23 AM   #21
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germar here is a place in Austin that has photography classes.

For literature on developing check Kodaks website.
07-31-2008, 07:06 AM   #22
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Ilford has a lot of info and instruction as well on their site.
07-31-2008, 07:21 AM   #23
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ILFORD has the following topics:

* Thinking in Black & White
* Getting Started
* Taking Pictures in Black & White
* Developing Black & White Films
* The Negative
* Printing in Black & White

and datasheets here:
PRODUCT PAGE

I have the Kodak PDFs if you want them send me a pm and I'll email

07-31-2008, 09:14 AM   #24
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the frugalphotographer also has some basic info, and the coffee developer instructions. (You use instant coffee and other kitchen staples to develop film)

The particular tank they recommend is more commonly available as the JOBO. Back in the day I used the Paterson, which was much easier to use than stainless steel stuff, although sometimes the edges (where no image is) didn't get the full development. The film guide in the JOBO is even better - I'd go with one of those as I would use it for 120 film, which is a bit floppy.

I had - and maybe still have somewhere, though I doubt it - the Paterson washer hose. The way that works is you put one end on your faucet and the other in the center of the tank. Water is forced from the bottom of the tank out through the lip on the top. Not essential, but cool.
07-31-2008, 03:13 PM   #25
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QuoteOriginally posted by titrisol Quote
I do not squeeze the film, I use a salad spinner to centrifuge most of the water out
That is awesome. I guess the rule is "whatever works".
08-01-2008, 12:36 AM   #26
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1. paterson tanks are good, but Freestyle brand/KALT/BESSELER spirals are the way to go. They have a wider "lip"to start with the film and that for 120 is a blessing. I guess JOBO are similar.

I have never been able to go with stainless spirals but I'm just a weirdo.

2. Caffenol is a funky developer tha works just for fun, in 2004 Donald Qualls, your truly and several other in photo net and APUG did many improvements and research.
Check in Donald's webpage for more instructions, suggestions and funky stuff

gee we have hijacked this thread into a development one hope it is OK
08-01-2008, 07:11 AM   #27
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Folks, thanks so much for all the info on film processing. It is something I am keen to do as well....

I know that different films have different grains built into them, but can the film processing affect this as well?
08-01-2008, 09:41 AM   #28
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QuoteOriginally posted by jgredline Quote
Folks, thanks so much for all the info on film processing. It is something I am keen to do as well....

I know that different films have different grains built into them, but can the film processing affect this as well?
Yes it does. Different developers make films look differently--sometimes so much so you wouldn't guess it's the same film...

You might want to take a look at the Analog Photography Users Group, another forum dedicated entirely to analog photography in all its forms and everything associated with it.
08-01-2008, 11:30 AM   #29
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QuoteOriginally posted by titrisol Quote

gee we have hijacked this thread into a development one hope it is OK
No problem! I was the OP and I asked for your experience....lots of great feedback, much thanks!

germar
08-01-2008, 11:43 AM   #30
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What about used development gear?

Since this is now a grain/development thread, I'll ask a follow on.....

I see TONS of lab gear on my local craig's list. Is it cool to buy used tanks and reels? Or am I better off buying new stuff. Take it for granted I probably don't want to by second hand chemicals... but I might be able to save a bit on hardware, if it's a good idea.

What say you all?

germar
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