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12-27-2020, 04:54 PM - 1 Like   #16
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QuoteOriginally posted by LensBeginner Quote
BTW it makes a lot of sense to do like some people do, to poke screws through a thin cardboard (Bristol-like) with a rough outline of the camera drawn on it, or to do the same thing with double sided tape.
I didn't have to learn it the hard way, fortunately
This is what I do when taking apart my Honda Goldwing when all that plastic & innards have to come apart for maintenance. Also, I use egg cartons to hold bolts & washers, so many are very similar but not exactly the same.

12-27-2020, 05:13 PM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by AstroDave Quote
Take pictures at each step, as well, as you go along, That's why we have cameras!
this I have pics of my washing machine, dryer, various car repairs etc
12-28-2020, 04:42 AM   #18
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I always use a plastic storage box that is divided into sections, as used for storing small craft items. Each sub-assembly goes into its own compartment with fixing screws, the compartments are used in order as disassembled so its just a case of reversing direction when assembling. The box has the advantage of having a lid so that removes the problem of bits getting mixed up if it gets knocked or moved.
12-29-2020, 03:33 PM   #19
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I use old film canisters to store the sub assemblies, anything too big goes in a small jar with the film canister for the teensy parts.

12-29-2020, 04:47 PM   #20
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I do similar, as well as map the screws to holes, and secure the screws with tape.


Steve
12-29-2020, 07:22 PM   #21
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I picked up this older pentax af zoom really cheap and the movement was a little rough in spots. I also noticed that something internally was rattling. I figured this would be a cheap way for me to learn how a lens comes apart. So I put down a nice large white pillowcase on the workbench, and very carefully removed each screw and layed them out carefully on the white pillowcase. I then swiveled my chair around to grab my phone and take a pic. The back of the chair hit the corner of my bench, and you can guess what happened to the nice neatly layed out screws. Now you know why I made a clock out of a lens...
12-29-2020, 08:49 PM - 3 Likes   #22
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QuoteOriginally posted by ChrisPlatt Quote
My first job after technical school was as a bench technician in the camera service department at Olympus USA in Woodbury NY.

I was trained on and serviced the OM-PC (aka OM-40) camera, 50/1.8 lens and T-20 & T-32 flash units, then current models.
Other techs worked on OM-1/2/3/4 models and the then brand new OM-77AF, plus lenses and other system accessories.

Each camera model uses a dozen or more different types and size screws, mostly tiny.
The floor tiles in our work area were white with small shiny metallic flecks in them.

Once accidentally dropped on that floor small parts would seem to disappear.
The tech would have to weigh the time and embarrassment of searching the floor on hands and knees
with a flashlight versus the time and embarrassment of another trip to the parts room.

Not that this ever happened to me, you understand...

Chris
After 4 or 5 years as a Motorola electronics manufacturing test engineer and then product engineer (remember when there were factories in the US?), I became a field service technical trainer for cell phones in 1998. As part of the training I spent a few days in a Chicago repair hub getting a good feeling for it, especially working with surface mount parts. The melting point of the solder was only a few degrees lower than the damaging burning temp of some components so it was some sort of an art to do manually.
I once had a little board (maybe a square inch) of about 25 components heated up to the point where all components were floating in liquid solder so 1 in particular could be removed.
Then I bumped the board, ending with an ugly mess. The repair tech laughed and said it was common. He asked me to scrap it and replace it. But I was stubborn and I told him I would fix it. He laughed again. So I spent long hours of my spare time on this personal battle. At the end? Not even close. To this day I still vividly remember been beaten by a square inch Richard4 SMT board over 22 years ago.

Thanks,

12-30-2020, 05:50 PM   #23
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QuoteOriginally posted by ismaelg Quote
After 4 or 5 years as a Motorola electronics manufacturing test engineer and then product engineer
Ahhh, so there is the prior experience needed to do the fine work revealed on these pages. Definitely will leave these makeovers to you...
12-31-2020, 03:13 AM   #24
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QuoteOriginally posted by Wingincamera Quote
This is what I do when taking apart my Honda Goldwing when all that plastic & innards have to come apart for maintenance. Also, I use egg cartons to hold bolts & washers, so many are very similar but not exactly the same.
That egg carton tip is perfect for all those times I have things to store during a disassembly, but can't be bothered to remove grease & dirt from the container afterwards, just brilliant, thanks!
12-31-2020, 03:05 PM   #25
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QuoteOriginally posted by ismaelg Quote
The melting point of the solder was only a few degrees lower than the damaging burning temp of some components so it was some sort of an art to do manually.

In the late 1970's a tech declined repair on my CB radio because he claimed it had dual sided pc boards.
Now circuit boards can have multiple layers. Those must be lots of fun to work on!

Modern electronic camera bodies use flexible circuit boards with surface mounted components;
I destroyed several of these by burning holes through a few even at the solder safe points.

Given inevitable electronic component failure without spare complete circuit boards
unlike mechanical models these cameras have a finite lifespan.

Chris
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