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12-29-2008, 07:48 AM   #76
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QuoteOriginally posted by Blue Quote
Woof, What is the focusing screen like on the '1957' Pentax?
Blue - good question! The focusing grid on the 1957 "AP" is even bigger than in the S3/SV. Much bigger. In terms of the relative sizes and appearances, the best I can do is the following approximation:

Spotmatic ... appears as a little smaller than a dime
S3/SV ... a little bigger than a nickle
AP ... much bigger than a quarter

Each step is at least 100% larger than the last...

The quality of the microprism area (edit: matte focusing area NOT microprism) on the 1957 is not as good as the S3/SV, but with a little work it is quite good and certainly very effective. You get used to it fast. See for yourself...



For full text see: Cameras of my collection - the Original Asahi-Pentax

woof


Last edited by woof; 12-29-2008 at 09:24 AM.
12-29-2008, 08:55 AM   #77
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QuoteOriginally posted by ChrisPlatt Quote
Are you sure the focusing aid on the older models is a microprism?
My stock S1a had a circular central matte area of different texture.
Have a look at the original manual for the SV/S1a. Page 11 of 33 in the PDF, and the actual manual page is Page 9. Clearly states that for the SV/S1a it is a microprism.

http://www.cameramanuals.org/pentax_pdf/pentax_sv_s1a.pdf

Hope this helps!

On the other hand... I double checked the very early models (1957-1958) and you are right that on the '57 it is not a microprism. A simple matte area. I just pulled it out and had a look. Definitely not a microprism. As I said, takes getting used to, but on balance effective.

Frankly, I was thinking of my "K" when I responded. Been shooting it a lot lately. I pulled out my "S" and "K" along with the "AP" and it was indeed the "K" when they first introduced the microprism. My mistake. Sorry. Thanks for the correction.


woof!
12-29-2008, 11:51 AM   #78
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To answer the OP: there really isn't much difference. I own a Spotmatic F (which my father bought when he was my age), and a friend of mine has his father's K1000. We went shooting around town one day, and to be honest, got about the same output. The specs on both cameras are the same, with two exceptions: the DOF preview is gone on the K1000, and the K mount is used in place of the M42 mount.

Which leads us into the deal breaker: Takumar. I've attempted to run halfway over Hell's green acre with my Spotmatic, swapping lenses while in motion, and it's not a simple business. You have to be gentle to prevent threading the lens improperly on the mount, and it certainly takes a bit longer to get the lenses on and off when they make three rotations instead of a quarter turn. But that's not really what the Takumar lenses are about. They're about f'in amazing detail. These are lenses that, with the right operator and film behind them, can rival shots taken on a 1DS with L glass. They are *that* good. Anyone who tells you different isn't using them properly. I've seen comparisons, but sadly, not online ones, or I'd point you to my proof. Suffice it to say we get a lot of pros at my work. One still uses his Spot in the field.

I've contemplated replacing my Spot because it needs to be entirely reworked at this point and is likely to cost me a fair sum to do so, but there's some sentiment attached to my particular camera. That and you have to stop down to meter Takumar glass on the K mount, and some cameras (the K1000 for example) make that impossible.

My personal favorite Spot feature: the matchstick meter. Take enough time to get acquainted with it's readout, and you can get creative and do incredible things.
12-29-2008, 12:25 PM   #79
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QuoteOriginally posted by drewdlephone Quote
. . .
I've contemplated replacing my Spot because it needs to be entirely reworked at this point and is likely to cost me a fair sum to do so, but there's some sentiment attached to my particular camera. That and you have to stop down to meter Takumar glass on the K mount, and some cameras (the K1000 for example) make that impossible.

. . .
You can get it cleaned, calibrated, light seals replaced etc. for around $65 by a trained Honeywell guy, Eric: Home

12-29-2008, 08:01 PM   #80
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QuoteOriginally posted by Blue Quote
You can get it cleaned, calibrated, light seals replaced etc. for around $65 by a trained Honeywell guy, Eric: Home
Thanks! I totally forgot about him, though I think it had been mentioned before. I love my Spot... took it out today during a melty snowy day and got some awesome shots with it until the temperature took the mirror mechanism out of commission. It sucks because it only works when it wants to, not when I want it to. But a little service will fix that.
01-02-2009, 10:40 PM   #81
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This is why my Spotmatic is probably my favorite camera.

I think of my cameras as a bunch of kids in school. You have the ones who are very smart and can do everything and beyond (DSLR PENTAX), and you have the regular ones who do just enough to get by.. ( SF1, ME Super, K1000, Etc ) but then you have a special one. who is capable of so much, yet kinda hides it. ( Spotmatic) This is how I think of my stuff......and for that my spotmatic is the favorite amongst the bunch.

Takumars rule.
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01-03-2009, 01:49 AM   #82
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Why I love the ESII:




That was taken under near pitch black conditions. I could barely see to frame the subject, and reading the meter (or getting a reading with my handheld meter) was entirely out of the question. But put the ESII on "Automatic" with the viewfinder blinds closed down, set off the shutter with the self-timer, and that wonderful electronic shutter takes care of everything for you.

Last edited by Mike Cash; 01-03-2009 at 05:35 AM. Reason: typo
01-03-2009, 02:05 AM   #83
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QuoteOriginally posted by Mike Cash Quote
Why I love the ESII:




That was taken under near pitch black conditions. I could barely see to frame the subject, and reading the meter (or getting a reading with my handheld meter) was entirely out of the question. But put the ESII on "Automatic" with the viewfinder blinds closed down, set off the shutter with the self-timer, and that wonder electronic shutter takes care of everything for you.
That is a very cool shot, Mike. I love how it doesn't *look* like it's nighttime.

01-03-2009, 04:56 AM   #84
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QuoteOriginally posted by Mike Cash Quote
Why I love the ESII:




That was taken under near pitch black conditions. I could barely see to frame the subject, and reading the meter (or getting a reading with my handheld meter) was entirely out of the question. But put the ESII on "Automatic" with the viewfinder blinds closed down, set off the shutter with the self-timer, and that wonder electronic shutter takes care of everything for you.
Good shot, Mike. Now you're making me want to look for an ESII. Not good.

Amazing how that shot would rarely be thought of to have been taken in very dark conditions.
01-03-2009, 05:42 AM   #85
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I had done some other night shots with it before and it was pretty impossible to tell they hadn't been taken in daylight conditions, but I was still shocked when I scanned that image and saw how it had come out.

Here's a shot from the same roll and same location of a more identifiable night scene:




Pentax Spotmatic ESII
Super Takumar 200/4
DNP Centuria 400


Apparently with enough night time lights the exposure stays short enough to leave the sky and water dark. But in the scene that was near uniformly pitch black it evened out the whole scene, with the exception of where diffuse light "pollution" from across the bay near the horizon made it more light.
01-03-2009, 06:29 AM   #86
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QuoteOriginally posted by KFrog Quote
Brianog, Imagine my surprise when I was casually reading posts on this forum when I came to your post and saw your link to ebay. I'm also looking for a Spotmatic so I clicked on the link. That was the same one I was bidding on! It sure looked good too. Make sure you let us know what kind of shape it's in when you get it. Anyway hope you enjoy it and wish me luck in my quest to join you in the Spotmatic club.
I was delighted to win the bidding for that Spotmatic especially when it is 'faceless' names I was bidding against. However, it is not so much fun to know it was against a fellow Pentax enthusiast I was competing. The Spotmatic I 'won' is in impeccable condition. The seals seem new although I think I will replace the mirror foam. The super takumar lens (55mm) is so clean and clear that I would say it is now the cleanest lens in all my collection. I am waiting for the batteries to arrive to see if the meter is working. It would be nice if it is working but it wont stop me using the spotmatic if it is not. I wish you success in your search for a Spotmatic. After the Christmas holidays is a good time buy on ebay as people don't have so much spare cash for bidding. I will be shooting my first roll of film tomorrow. By the way, the Spotmatic, especially with the leather case is one of the most comfortable cameras to hold. Don't give up searching!
01-03-2009, 09:36 AM   #87
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QuoteOriginally posted by Mike Cash Quote
Why I love the ESII:




That was taken under near pitch black conditions. I could barely see to frame the subject, and reading the meter (or getting a reading with my handheld meter) was entirely out of the question. But put the ESII on "Automatic" with the viewfinder blinds closed down, set off the shutter with the self-timer, and that wonderful electronic shutter takes care of everything for you.
01-03-2009, 09:38 AM   #88
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QuoteOriginally posted by Mike Cash Quote
I had done some other night shots with it before and it was pretty impossible to tell they hadn't been taken in daylight conditions, but I was still shocked when I scanned that image and saw how it had come out.

Here's a shot from the same roll and same location of a more identifiable night scene:




Pentax Spotmatic ESII
Super Takumar 200/4
DNP Centuria 400


Apparently with enough night time lights the exposure stays short enough to leave the sky and water dark. But in the scene that was near uniformly pitch black it evened out the whole scene, with the exception of where diffuse light "pollution" from across the bay near the horizon made it more light.
I love the framing and the way the lights bounce of the water from the ferris wheel, BUT that grain is different and awesome!.
01-03-2009, 10:04 AM   #89
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Thanks, Javier. I like the DNP Centuria film primarily because it is cheap cheap cheap.

Here's another shot from the same night, different location. I posted a K20D version of this in the Takumar Club thread.




Pentax Spotmatic ESII
S-M-C Takumar 35/2
DNP Centuria 400


Again, nothing could be easier than doing that sort of shot with the ESII. Compose, focus, turn the shutter dial close down the blinds, and click.........click.
01-03-2009, 10:43 AM   #90
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QuoteOriginally posted by Mike Cash Quote
Thanks, Javier. I like the DNP Centuria film primarily because it is cheap cheap cheap.

Here's another shot from the same night, different location. I posted a K20D version of this in the Takumar Club thread.




Pentax Spotmatic ESII
S-M-C Takumar 35/2
DNP Centuria 400


Again, nothing could be easier than doing that sort of shot with the ESII. Compose, focus, turn the shutter dial close down the blinds, and click.........click.

Ok, I quit!...This image is simply breath taking!....
I would print that large and put it in my living room.
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