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01-07-2009, 08:35 PM   #1
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K2 Film questions

Hi Everyone, I just got a K2 with Kodak BW400CN film for christmas. I'd really like to get into developing my own film. What would I need to do this? I also just ordered 4 rolls of the Kodak Ektar 100 film to try some color shots. Can I bring these types of film to a place like CVS to get them developed? To be honest, I've never used actual film in my whole life, I've just used a cheap digital point and shoot.

Thanks,
Ted

01-07-2009, 08:43 PM   #2
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Don't worry Ted, I'm not stalking you...

IIRC - in the past, if a lab machine is setup to do only C41 type processing and you run B&W film negatives through it, the prints come out with a sepia tone instead. Others can chime in... I'm done!

Cheers,
Marc
01-07-2009, 08:56 PM   #3
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It's possible to develop C-41 films at home, and plenty of people do. But it's much, much easier to develop true b&w films yourself... it's a three-step process. I won't go into much detail about it now, but it's something you can easily do in a bathroom, say, or the kitchen, in about an hour to an hour and a half.
01-07-2009, 09:24 PM   #4
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QuoteOriginally posted by Marc Langille Quote
Don't worry Ted, I'm not stalking you...

IIRC - in the past, if a lab machine is setup to do only C41 type processing and you run B&W film negatives through it, the prints come out with a sepia tone instead. Others can chime in... I'm done!

Cheers,
Marc

Will the C41 process films come out sepia tone also?

01-07-2009, 09:53 PM   #5
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QuoteOriginally posted by Stevopedia Quote
It's possible to develop C-41 films at home, and plenty of people do. But it's much, much easier to develop true b&w films yourself... it's a three-step process. I won't go into much detail about it now, but it's something you can easily do in a bathroom, say, or the kitchen, in about an hour to an hour and a half.
I found a good tutorial on how to do this here: YouTube - Episode 20, how to develop black and white film but I'm wondering if you guys have any recommendations on where to get some of this equipment, and maybe specific things to buy.

Thanks,
-Ted
01-08-2009, 03:10 AM   #6
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The prints may come out not purely b&w from a CVS lab - but you can safely let them develop the film you have. I don't bother with prints, I have them give me a photo CD - then I can de/tone to my hearts liking at home.
01-08-2009, 03:29 AM   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by thesaxman547 Quote
Hi Everyone, I just got a K2 with Kodak BW400CN film for christmas. I'd really like to get into developing my own film. What would I need to do this? I also just ordered 4 rolls of the Kodak Ektar 100 film to try some color shots. Can I bring these types of film to a place like CVS to get them developed? To be honest, I've never used actual film in my whole life, I've just used a cheap digital point and shoot.

Thanks,
Ted

Both BW400CN and Ektar 100 are C41-process films. That means they are designed to be developed with the C41 process, most easily achieved at your local photo lab or One-hour Photo shop. As Stevopedia indicated, it is possible to home-process, but this (C41 process) is not a good place for a beginner to start.

If you want to get into home processessing, you want to start with traditional B&W film and processing. The film is developed with traditional chemistry (developer, stop bath, fixer) in a light-proof tank, and can be easily done at home. (see http://www.ilfordphoto.com/Webfiles/200629163442455.pdf).

Some suitable films include Kodak T-Max and Tri-X, Ilford HP5+, FP4 and Delta 100.

But to start with, shoot your C41 process films and have them developed at a photo lab, and ask them to scan the negatives to a CD for you.

Have fun!
01-08-2009, 03:26 PM   #8
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Thanks for your help everyone. I'm currently ordering all the necessities to develop my own black and white from Adorama along with some true black and white film.

-Ted

01-08-2009, 03:46 PM   #9
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Enjoy your K2 and learning B&W film processing! I did my first roll about 40 years ago. Great fun!

Steve
01-08-2009, 06:08 PM   #10
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So I'm going to order Ilford Delta Pro 100. I've seen people say that you have to adjust exposure or something for certain films. Should I keep the exposure on 1x with 100 ASA for this film with a K2?

Thanks,
Ted
01-08-2009, 08:21 PM   #11
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QuoteOriginally posted by thesaxman547 Quote
So I'm going to order Ilford Delta Pro 100. I've seen people say that you have to adjust exposure or something for certain films. Should I keep the exposure on 1x with 100 ASA for this film with a K2?

Thanks,
Ted
Expose to the labeled ISO and develop to the recommended times until you get the hang of things. With more experience, you can modify the exposure and/or development to manage density, contrast, and grain. There are books that outline the basics (Ansel Adams, "The Negative" is a good start).

Steve
01-08-2009, 09:05 PM   #12
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You know, folks, I haven't shot that Delta Pro, myself, but anyone who has think that's a good one for beginning at all this?

I usually suggest the old standards, like Tri-x and HP5, in good old D-76 developer for starting people out on, Saxman. I

If that Delta Pro is similar to something else I've tried, (Namely Neopan Acros) the developing time could end up being rather short for someone just starting out: (which just rushes the process a bit and the film may be a bit fussier about time and temperature and agitation for you: best to keep it simple as possible on your first run-through.

With something like your Tri-X or HP5, you'll have a bit more time to think while developing, and it's a nice start at getting solidly-satisfying results. It's pretty forgiving stuff. Not that you need panic, either way, as long as you follow basic instructions, it works. Very like cooking, that way. The art to it can keep you entertained a long time.

I
01-08-2009, 11:10 PM   #13
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Delta 100 @ 100 iso in ID-11: 8 minutes 30 seconds at 20 degrees C.

HP5+ @ 400 iso in ID-11: 7 minutes 30 secondsat 20 degrees C.

So no - it looks like Delta 100 is the slower-developing film. Mind you HP5 is still my personal favourite, in ID-11 1+1, or DD-X 1+4 dilution.
01-09-2009, 12:30 AM   #14
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QuoteOriginally posted by ChrisN Quote
Both BW400CN and Ektar 100 are C41-process films. That means they are designed to be developed with the C41 process, most easily achieved at your local photo lab or One-hour Photo shop. As Stevopedia indicated, it is possible to home-process, but this (C41 process) is not a good place for a beginner to start.

If you want to get into home processessing, you want to start with traditional B&W film and processing. The film is developed with traditional chemistry (developer, stop bath, fixer) in a light-proof tank, and can be easily done at home. (see http://www.ilfordphoto.com/Webfiles/200629163442455.pdf).

Some suitable films include Kodak T-Max and Tri-X, Ilford HP5+, FP4 and Delta 100.

But to start with, shoot your C41 process films and have them developed at a photo lab, and ask them to scan the negatives to a CD for you.

Have fun!
I am putting that link in my signature for future reference with these questions. good stuff.
01-09-2009, 10:46 AM   #15
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QuoteOriginally posted by ChrisN Quote
Delta 100 @ 100 iso in ID-11: 8 minutes 30 seconds at 20 degrees C.

HP5+ @ 400 iso in ID-11: 7 minutes 30 secondsat 20 degrees C.

So no - it looks like Delta 100 is the slower-developing film. Mind you HP5 is still my personal favourite, in ID-11 1+1, or DD-X 1+4 dilution.
Cool, thanks for mentioning that, Chris. I thought I'd been noticing a trend with these newer films and developers.

I still think some of the old standards are a good start, just cause they're probably more forgiving in general, but there's one less thing to worry about.
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