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01-28-2009, 03:07 AM   #1
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Double Exposure or Half Frame With a Spotmatic2 (help)

A call out to Spotmatic users,

Being quite new to the world of photography I was wondering if anyone is able to offer advice on how to achieve double exposure on a spotmatic2? So I'll throw a few questions out there and see what happens. *fingers crossed*

I searched on this forum and elsewhere on the net and what I've mainly found is that you would take your original images, push in the rewind button and wind back then take the second images....(Though, I would presume the first photos would have to be taken within the fist half of the film to ensure correct positioning of the image when taking the second image..??? or maybe that would be an easy beginning for a noob??) *shrugs*

Also, I'm wondering if using an old 'split-field' lens and 'blacking' out the lens half (matt paint) would work the same as using a 1/2 mask?

So? Would I then have to lengthen my exposure or adjust my fstop with the second image to match the first?


(In other words, I know squat-all about this.)


Last edited by Miserysmalice; 01-28-2009 at 04:05 AM. Reason: Title incorrect
01-28-2009, 03:21 AM   #2
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Are you trying to shoot double exposures? Or are you trying to fit two separate exposures (half-frame) into the 24x36 space of a regular photo? What you're describing sounds more like shooting half-frame than double exposure.
01-28-2009, 03:29 AM   #3
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Welcome aboard, Miserysmalice - great name!

The double exposure thing depends on what sort of thing you're after. Taking a bunch of pics or even the whole roll, then rewinding part or all the way and starting again will most likely result in frame registers being all mixed up. In other words, the picture won't line up with the previous picture. This is because with 35mm film framing is relative...

The 'official' way to do a double exposure: take your photo. Then hold the bottom button down and gingerly do the frame advance: this should result in the film not moving but the shutter getting re-armed. Then shoot your second pic.

There are ways around the problems - if you consider them problems! - of the first approach. I've marked the film when I first load it, so that I can line the mark up the second time around, for example. When you rewind the roll, make sure you leave the leader out so you can load it back in the camera!

--

But your idea doesn't seem to be of a true double exposure - where two separate exposures overlap each other on one piece of film.

You seem to be thinking in terms of a split image, where one side of the frame is one pic, the other side is another?

If that's what you're after, and don't mind some creative imprecision, then yes: by all means, try something half blacked out. Before painting the split field thing - simply hold cardboard or similar in front of the lens while you look through the view finder. You'll see the effect.

If you pursue this split field thing (I'd be interested in seein the results):

1) meter each side's picture without the 1/2 blackened cover - this way you get a correct exposure, as the dark side would bias towards over exposure. Meter each side separately, as long as you go for good exposure the two should 'balance' out. The overlap in the middle will take care of itself.

2) after taking pic 1, push the rewind button and do the frame advance to arm the shutter.

3) meter, put the black out on the other side, and take the second pic.

Good luck!
01-28-2009, 03:58 AM   #4
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QuoteOriginally posted by Mike Cash Quote
Are you trying to shoot double exposures? Or are you trying to fit two separate exposures (half-frame) into the 24x36 space of a regular photo? What you're describing sounds more like shooting half-frame than double exposure.
Oh, my bad.

Then it must be half frame. Thanks for pointing that out for me.

01-28-2009, 04:02 AM   #5
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QuoteOriginally posted by Nesster Quote
Welcome aboard, Miserysmalice - great name!

The double exposure thing depends on what sort of thing you're after. Taking a bunch of pics or even the whole roll, then rewinding part or all the way and starting again will most likely result in frame registers being all mixed up. In other words, the picture won't line up with the previous picture. This is because with 35mm film framing is relative...

The 'official' way to do a double exposure: take your photo. Then hold the bottom button down and gingerly do the frame advance: this should result in the film not moving but the shutter getting re-armed. Then shoot your second pic.

There are ways around the problems - if you consider them problems! - of the first approach. I've marked the film when I first load it, so that I can line the mark up the second time around, for example. When you rewind the roll, make sure you leave the leader out so you can load it back in the camera!

--

But your idea doesn't seem to be of a true double exposure - where two separate exposures overlap each other on one piece of film.

You seem to be thinking in terms of a split image, where one side of the frame is one pic, the other side is another?

If that's what you're after, and don't mind some creative imprecision, then yes: by all means, try something half blacked out. Before painting the split field thing - simply hold cardboard or similar in front of the lens while you look through the view finder. You'll see the effect.

If you pursue this split field thing (I'd be interested in seein the results):

1) meter each side's picture without the 1/2 blackened cover - this way you get a correct exposure, as the dark side would bias towards over exposure. Meter each side separately, as long as you go for good exposure the two should 'balance' out. The overlap in the middle will take care of itself.

2) after taking pic 1, push the rewind button and do the frame advance to arm the shutter.

3) meter, put the black out on the other side, and take the second pic.

Good luck!
Thank you so much for this advice.

I didn't think about marking the film when loaded. *slaps forehead*

I'll give it a go with doing double exp and half frame/split imaging.

Also I'll be sure to post up the results when I've semi-mastered the procedure. :P
01-28-2009, 04:15 AM   #6
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If you hunt around on auctions you can find some purpose-built half-frame cameras out there.

If you ever decide to try double exposure you can similarly find some old cameras where the film winding mechanism and the shutter cocking mechanism weren't connected to each other in any way and you actually have to exercise caution to not get double exposures.

This is an unintentional double exposure of a train station platform and ticket window done with a Yashica D because I forgot to wind the film:



01-28-2009, 08:27 AM   #7
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LOL - me too, Mike. The most unique double exposures I did were with two cameras. What happened - I got one of my Vitomatics to work for a bit, two exposures to be precise. Then it froze up. So I rewound the film and loaded it into a Yashica T4.
01-28-2009, 10:25 AM   #8
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one thing to add to nesster's comments is with respect to exposure.

If you are doing double exposure, i.e. 2 shots on one frame, you need to under expose each by half, i.e. -1 stop, so that the average exposure is correct. This is especially true if you are doing a multiple exposure (n shots) to show motion from the wind for example, each frame would be 1/n of the exposure, therefore a stationary object would be correctly exposed and moving objects would be under exposed semi transparent images

there are exceptios to this, however. Specifcially shooting the moon separate from another scene, and imposing the two together. Assuming the moon is much brighter than its background sky, you would expose the moon correctly, and then also expose your second shot correctly.

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