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02-09-2009, 01:59 PM   #31
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i like aestethics of film much more than digital. film makes me think about what i want to shoot, with digital i always want to take "just another one, just to check how will it look" - ending with pile of almost identical rubbish.

i'm going to a gig with my gf tomorrow evening, we're going with K100Ds + FA50/1.4 and Zenit EM + 58/2, i'll be shooting film, but can't decide what film i want - Kodak Ultramax 400 or Kodak Gold 1000 epired 10 years ago.

02-09-2009, 02:44 PM   #32
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QuoteOriginally posted by SuperAkuma Quote
One thing that I hate about film is waiting for it to be developed!


I just did my first assignment for class today and shot a rolls of film. I got a few really good shots and I can't wait to see them. The lab for the class is on next Monday and here in the US, next Monday is President's day so school will be closed. So I will have to wait for another week before I can see my photos when I develop it.

I wish I had my own darkroom!
+1 on the home darkroom, and waiting for development (film's only drawback?).

I also just finished off a roll for my photo class... unfortunately I didn't get to use a Pentax because the KX is off to Eric and the K1000 is out of commission, leaving me only with the backup AE-1.

But we have class again on Wednesday, and I'll dev my roll then!
02-09-2009, 03:23 PM   #33
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but part of the fun of film is the anticipation ! ... although usually b/c most of my photos are pointless, it's more of a surprise because i forgot what i took pictures of and i'm too lazy to take notes.
02-09-2009, 05:10 PM   #34
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I deliberately keep a small backlog of exposed film, to ensure that I always have to wait at least a little bit to see my photos. Maybe I'm weird.

02-10-2009, 03:00 AM   #35
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QuoteOriginally posted by BetterSense Quote
I deliberately keep a small backlog of exposed film, to ensure that I always have to wait at least a little bit to see my photos. Maybe I'm weird.
Not at all. I have at least 4 rolls each of 35mm and 120 waiting to be developed. I've gotten so bad about letting them pile up that I have taken to storing the 35mm in film canisters with a piece of paper to at least remind me what camera they came out of. On the 120 I just lightly write it on the outside of the roll.
02-10-2009, 08:55 AM   #36
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I've got 3 rolls waiting to be developed, 2 B&W and 1 C41. Sometimes it's hard to keep on top of, but then maybe it's good to separate the image from how you felt when taking it (I think that's a Winogrand saying)
02-10-2009, 09:57 AM   #37
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I've been shooting Kodack Ultramax (400 ASA) with good results. Just got me a Spotmatic SPII with a Super-Takumar 1.4. (I thought it should have been a Super-Multi-Coated??)Got a couple of K1000, 2 ME-Super. Been at it since I was 12. Never Digital. (Mywife does). I'm 70 now. Great forum!
02-18-2009, 05:52 PM   #38
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- I like not knowing whether I nailed the shot or not after a trip to the great outdoors.
- The anticipation of getting the film back.
- Using the same camera for decades getting totally familiar with it.
- The discipline involved when shooting film; film cost money and one usually don't have unlimited supply at hand.

Besides, I already own a fantastic digital camera that happens to take images of film: Nikon Coolscan 9000 ED!


Last edited by Pål Jensen; 02-18-2009 at 06:13 PM.
02-18-2009, 06:20 PM   #39
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QuoteOriginally posted by Pål Jensen Quote
Besides, I already own a fantastic digital camera that happens to take images of film: Nikon Coolscan 9000 ED!
mmmmmmmmmm
02-20-2009, 09:35 PM   #40
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you're welcome

Ghelary,

You're most welcome. I am so glad to hear you are enjoying the camera. Years ago, I owned a Super A (the European version of the Super Program), and I loved that camera! Yes, there are some aspects of film photography that I do miss, but I am still ever so glad I made the digital switch.
02-23-2009, 04:11 AM   #41
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QuoteOriginally posted by Pål Jensen Quote
Many similarities: LP's sounds better than CD and film looks better than digital. CD and Digital images (even from MF backs!) have the same problem; lack of texture. Oh they might be crystal clear and great for outlining shapes, but the surfaces are lacking in structure and texture. Needless to say, after I have upgraded to a Nottingham Spacedeck with Lyra Argo "i" pick-up, I've sold CD's for $3000, and my LP collection is growing.
Equally needless to say, my 645NII system is still my main photographic tool....
Very true regarding the texture on film vs. digital. Duncan had a fun thread about the subject :
https://www.pentaxforums.com/forums/pentax-film-slr-discussion/25236-still-op...n-digital.html


QuoteOriginally posted by CSoars Quote
Plus I like the greater dynamic range that negative print film has over slides and digital; for me that's a huge benefit to shooting analog, as I more often than not find myself in high contrast situations.
Yup, B&W is simply not duplicated well enough with digital.
And the dynamic range pictures; analog still handles better.


QuoteOriginally posted by Erik Quote
I don't really take pictures OF people but I think strangers are more likely to pose relaxedly for you if you walk around with a Spotmatic than if you threw a 1D with half a meter of intimidating L lens in their faces.
I haven’t thought of it that way, but I think you’re right.
An older analog film cam, gives more the impression of a connoisseur. Where as a big DSLR firing away, seem more like a paparazzi.


QuoteOriginally posted by SuperAkuma Quote
One thing that I hate about film is waiting for it to be developed!

I just did my first assignment for class today and shot a rolls of film. I got a few really good shots and I can't wait to see them. The lab for the class is on next Monday and here in the US, next Monday is President's day so school will be closed. So I will have to wait for another week before I can see my photos when I develop it.

I wish I had my own darkroom!
You could just go to a one hour place, (if speed was important to you).
Anyway I like reliving a vacation, when I went to pick up my print. And remembering where I took the pictures.
02-23-2009, 11:17 AM   #42
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I've been digital-free for at least two months now. Sold my K200D when I got my Spotmatic F back from Eric and realized what it was capable of. No, I don't miss the "instant satisfaction" at all. It's all about the fun. Screwmount lenses are a little hard to come by in my neck of the woods, but that's about my only complaint, because I would like the 85/1.9, 200/4 and 300/4 lenses to fan out the collection a bit.

If you like to shoot outdoors in landscapes, I heartily recommend Ektar 100 film. Lowest grain achievable with color film, and the saturation levels do some pretty funky things with afternoon sunlight (some people might feel it a bit "overcooked"). I find Fuji Superia 200/400 to be good all purpose color film too. Haven't played with Reala or slide films yet.

Oh and if you want to try your hand at portraits, find a roll of Kodak Portra 100 or 400. The skin tones will make you weak in the knees.
02-23-2009, 11:39 AM   #43
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film is great especially medium format.
but digital blows my mind. 100% freedom and with PP you can make it look like what ever film you want and it looks like better film then a real film
and most importantly for the price of $0
I love my k1000 ... its fun and cool and feel great to shoot with
but other then emotional reasons there is no practical reason today to shoot film.
all the money I save on developing I invest in lenses what more can one ask
02-25-2009, 02:42 PM   #44
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QuoteOriginally posted by ghelary Quote
I was thinking about it for some time.

To me it has the same attraction as going from CD to vinyl, it's less practical, less easy, less performing, but it add a charm to the shots and a process of taking pictures that attracts me a lot.


Regards,
Guillaume
QuoteOriginally posted by Pål Jensen Quote
Many similarities: LP's sounds better than CD and film looks better than digital. CD and Digital images (even from MF backs!) have the same problem; lack of texture. Oh they might be crystal clear and great for outlining shapes, but the surfaces are lacking in structure and texture. Needless to say, after I have upgraded to a Nottingham Spacedeck with Lyra Argo "i" pick-up, I've sold CD's for $3000, and my LP collection is growing.
Equally needless to say, my 645NII system is still my main photographic tool....
Comparisons of film and memory cards with records and compact discs and some of this talk has leaves me with no choice but to drop in if only to stir the attention of others in return.
I have had my K10 for nearly three years now and quickly moved away from my film cameras. This move was very quick in fact. Surprised me that I could love a digital camera this much. But I have not given up on my film cameras entirely. Infact, I have been playing around and experimenting so much with the digital camera that I now can see that which I had over looked often in some of my film cameras and have decided that it is still important, for me that is, to maintain experience and knowledge of film practices.
Back in the late 1980's my record collection was just starting with probably 100 records when the digital compact disc was released to the consumer public. I said I would never buy compact discs as I saw them as just too small, too much less of the experience and too costly. I now have about 1,000 vinyl l.p. records and 1,000 compact discs.
I certainly hope to never abandon the vinyl pleasures and qualities of film but damn do I love this K10 and occasionally the utter silences in the music of Pink Floyd from a compact disc while looking at the fold out artwork and liner notes from a 35 year old record.
Spin the black circle but music and photography sometimes should be enjoyed no matter what medium and tools!
02-25-2009, 03:05 PM   #45
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Well put, Nowhere Matt!

Myself, I've been recapitulating phylogeny - seeing all the steps involved in making photography more reliable, automated, less of a chore. Or an appliance, some may say.

I've partially recapitulated the same in audio, building single ended tube amps etc.

One phenomenon that seems to happen is the limitations of the older medium - when it was the only choice - chafed. Now these are a choice. The qualities we've grown up with are familiar and carry a nostalgic fondness. Not to mention, analog signals don't have the hard cut-offs that digital ones do, and thus theoretically one can resolve further into noise.

But this explains why grain and other film artifacts are prized nowadays. And why pop songs will put in exaggerated pops and clicks to evoke a really bad record on a really bad record player

It's also true that we haven't fully acclimated to the limitations and distortions of digital - we're still fairly early in that cycle.

Myself, I'll play LPs but find CDs and nowadays internet radio far more convenient. I'll shoot 35mm SLR or digital, but for that hair shirt experience I'll go to folders and TLRs...
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